What We Are Reading

Enjoy this week’s list!

Articles
Flipping Primary Health Care: A Personal Story by Kedar S. Mate and Gilbert Salinas. We’re leading off this week with a fascinating case study that describes what happened when one patient, Gilbert Salinas, “flipped the clinic.” After deciding to accept fellowship that would move him from California to Cambridge, MA he worked with his care team to take control of many of the tasks typically performed in the clinic.

Most importantly, I feel happier and healthier, and I am amazed that I have been able to accomplish my goal of being healthy during this year away from my providers. It has transformed my sense of what is possible and has encouraged me to take further ownership of my health.

A Case for Autonomy & The End of Participatory Medicine by Hugo Campos. I’m constantly in awe of our friend and QS community member, Hugo Campos. As a leader in the fight for access to personal data (see this great NPR piece from 2012) he’s been an inspiration for our own ongoing Access Matters work. In this post, Hugo makes the case for focusing less of patient participation in the medical system, and re-orienting towards improving patient autonomy and self-determination.

Health Data Outside the Doctor’s Office by Jon White, Karen DeSalvo, and Michael Painter. In this short post, the smart folks at RWJF introduce the new JASON group report, Data for Individual Health, which

“[…] lays out recommendations for an infrastructure that could not only achieve interoperability among electronic health records (EHRs), but could also integrate data from all walks of life—including data from personal health devices, patient collaborative networks, social media, environmental and demographic data and genomic and other “omics” data.”

A Systematic Review of Barriers to Data Sharing in Public Health by Willem van Panhuis and colleagues. In this review article, the authors outline twenty specific barriers standing in the way of sharing data that could improve global public health programs. They include numerous examples of the technical, motivational, economic, political, legal, and ethical barriers that prevent more sharing across public health systems.

#WeAreNotWaiting at the Fall 2014 D-Data ExChange: The Stars Are Aligning by Mike H. QS Labs was unfortunately unable to attend the Fall 2014 D-Data ExChange, but were excited to read this great summary of the event.

Show&Tell
The Quantified Self and Humanities Best Friend by Kevin P. Kevin found out that he could track his dog, Lilo, along with himself when he went for walks and runs. In this short post he outlines his process, and the barriers he ran into, for collecting data from his different devices to show his progress on a recent 5k walk.

Follow-up study: on the working time budget of a university teacher. 45 years self-observation pdf hereby Dimitar Todorovsky. Dimitar is a recently retired researcher and professor of Chemistry and Pharmacy at the University of Sofia in Bulgaria. In this journal article he outlines his findings from tracking his time every day over his 45-year career. Most striking to me is that he averaged 10hr of work per calendar day for the entire 45-year period.

Visualizations
HR_proposal
Heart Rate (bpm) during marriage proposal by reddit user sesipikai. Going to Rome to surprise your fiancé to be? Why not record your excitement and nervousness by wearing a heart rate chest strap!


To Big to Fail by Nicholas Felton. In this great video presentation Nicholas Felton describes the process behind building the latest in his series of Annual Reports. You can also check out the full 2013 Annual Report here.

From the Forum
Counterintuitive HRV Measurements
Active, Athletic Folks With Asthma Tracking Their Performance
Mobile Health and Fitness Apps Privacy Study
OP Innovations Sensors
Hexoskin
Timer/logger/tracker–what kind of gadget am I looking for?

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