Tag Archives: analysis

Quantified Homescreens

Quantifying-Homescreens

Betaworks recently announced that they had collected data from over 40,000 users who shared their iPhone homescreens through their apptly named #homescreen app. As they stated in their announcement, the apps people keep on their homescreen are often the apps they use the most. Being a data-minded individual I thought, “I wonder what kind of questions you could ask of this kind of data?” Of course, I immediately jumped to using the data to try and understand the landscape of self-tracking and quantified self app use. Let’s dive in.

Methods

I didn’t do anything fancy here. I used the search function to look up specific applications that I either use myself or have heard of. I also used the “in folders with” and “on homescreens with” lists to find additional applications that weren’t on my initial list. Each of the apps I found went into a Google Spreadsheet along with the “on % of homesceens” value reported by #homescreen. Additionally I categorized each of the apps into one of seven very broad categories: Activity, Fitness, Diet, Sleep, General Tracking, General Health, and Other.

Screen Shot 2015-02-14 at 9.52.05 AM

If you search for an app this is the data that is returned.

Results

I was able identify 65 unique applications reported as being present on #homescreen users iPhone homescreens. While in no way a complete list, I think it’s a good sample to see what people are using in their everyday life. So, how does the data actually break down?

Category Representation

categoryrepresentationThe most popular category was Activity with 20 apps (30.8%) followed by Fitness (15 / 23.1%), General Tracking (11 / 16.9%), a tie between General Health and Diet (6 / 9.2% each), Sleep (5 / 7.7%), and Other (2 / 3.1%).

Frequency of Homescreen Appearance

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Apple’s Health app tops the list here with a whoping 23.45%. No other self-tracking application even comes close to that level of homescreen penetration. The next most frequent application is Day One (a journaling app) with 8.45%.

homescreenfreq_WHealth

Clearly Apple Health skews the data so let’s look at homescreen frequency without it in the data set:

homescreenfreq_woHealth

When you exclude Apple Health (a clear outlier) the average percentage for homescreen frequency is 0.83% with a standard deviation of 1.39%. This data is skewed by a high number of applications that appear very infrequently. How skewed?

freqHistogram

If we disregard all apps that fall below this 1% cutoff what do we find? Fourteen apps meet this criteria: Coach.me, Day One, Fitbit, Health Mate (Withings), Moves, MyFitnessPal, Nike+, Pedometer++, Runkeeper, Runtastic Pro, Sleep Better, Sleep Cycle, Strava, and UP (Jawbone):

homescreenfreq_more1percent

Interestingly, MyFitnessPal is the only “Diet” app that made this >1% list, but it has the second highest appearance percentage at 4.36. Sleep Cycle is not far behind at 3.98%.

Discussion

Let’s start with the caveats. Obviously you can’t take these simple findings and generalize it to all individuals with smartphone, especially because this is only capturing iPhone users (many of the apps in this list have Android versions as well). Second, this data is based on a relatively small sample size of 40,000 individuals that are using the #homescreen app. Third, users of #homescreen are probably not representative of the general population of self-tracking application users. Lastly, it’s hard to draw conclusions about actual app use from this data. Like many people (myself included), I’m sure this data set has more than a few users who don’t regularly change their homescreen configuration when apps fall out of favor.

With that out of the way, what did I actually find interesting in this data set?

I found that sleep tracking, or having sleep tracking apps on a homescreen, was more popular than I thought it would be. Of the top 15 apps, 2 were sleep. When exploring by category, sleep had the highest mean appearance percentage (when also excluding Apple Health) at 1.32% (n = 5 apps).

For connected tracking devices, Fitbit (3.47%) is the clear winner, far outpacing it’s wearable rivals. The next closest application that is at least partially dedicated to syncing with a wearable device was Health Mate by Withings (2.14%).

I was reluctant to include Day One in this analysis. It isn’t commonly thought of as a “self-tracking” or “quantified self” application, but journaling and daily diaries are a valid form of tracking a life. Clearly it resonates with the people in this data set.

This was a fun exercise, but I’m sure there are many more questions that can be answered with this data set. I’ve compiled everything in an open google spreadsheet. I’ve enabled editing in the spreadsheet so feel free to add apps I might have missed or create additional charts and analysis.

And in the spirit of full disclosure, he’s my current homescreen.

This post first appeared on our Medium publication “Notes on Numbers, where we’re starting to share some of our thoughts and editorial experiments. Follow along with us there

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How to Represent a Year in Numbers

As the calendar turns over to a new year, it’s useful to look back and see what the last 365 days have been all about. Looking back is always easier when you have something to look back on, and, no surprise here, self-tracking is a great help for trying to figure out how things went. That’s what makes this time of year so interesting for someone like myself. I spend a good deal of my time trying to track down real-world examples of people using personal data to explore their lives. Sometimes it’s easy, and sometimes it’s hard finding people willing to expose themselves and their data. However, when late December rolls around, I perk up because this is the time for those yearly reviews.

I’ve spent the last few weeks gathering up some great examples from individuals from all over the world. I hope the following examples inspire you to track something new in 2015 and maybe share it with the QS community in person at a local meetup, at our QS15 Global Conference, or in our social channels. Okay, let’s dive in!

My Year 2014 in Numbers #QuantifiedSelf by Ragnar Heil. A brief, but fun post detailing a year of music, travel, and location checkins.

2014: A Year in Review with iPhone Pedometer Data by Geoffrey Litt. I really enjoyed this very thorough exploration of a year’s worth of pedometer data gathered from the Argus app (iOS). Not satisfied with just looking at his total step count for the year, Geoffrey ran a series of data explorations. Among my favorite, his visualization of his daily rhythms:

GeoffreyLit_StepHours

2014 in Numbers – My Life Behind the Command Line by Quincy Larson. Work, wellness (sleep and running) and reading – it’s all here. I like the idea of tracking what you’ve read by writing one tweet per book.

2014, Quantified by Sarah Gregory. Sarah does an amazing job of capturing and showcasing her 2014 activities in this beautifully simple post. With a balance of pure quantitative information and qualitative insights I found this review especially compelling. (It was also nice to see that she used our How to Download Your Fitbit Data tutorial.)

2014 in Numbers by Donald Noble. Speaking of our Fitbit data download tutorial, here’s a short post about a year’s worth of steps – 4.15 million steps to be precise.

Three Years of Running Data: 1,153km with Nike+ and Mind by Todd Green. As you can see from the title, this post details three years of running, but as a runner myself I always like peeking into other runner’s data. (Todd also has a fantastic post from early 2014 about tracking every penny he spent in 2013.)

Food, Glorious Food by Peter Chambers. A fun post detailing what Peter and his family ate for dinner nearly every day of 2014. One juicy bit – the most common meal? Chili – Peter’s favorite!

2014 in Numbers by Jill Homer. With the help of her Strava app, Jill details her cycling and running from 2014. Click for the numbers, stay for the gorgeous photos.

I wrote every day in 2014: Here’s an #infographic by Jamie Todd Rubin. It’s great fun following Jaime’s blog. He’s relentless on his journey of daily writing (and is quite the active Fitbit user as well). What was 2014 like for his writing? Over 500,000 words – almost enough to take on Tolstoy’s War and Peace. Plus, the visualization is great (click through for the full version):

JamieTR_Writing

2014 Stats by Dan Goldin. Amazing data gathered from a self-designed Google spreadsheet that includes mood, sleep, food, and drink.

Tracking My Life in 2014 by Mike Shea. Mike tracks his life using his own custom designed “Lifetracker app.” This includes his rating on six aspects of his life, daily activities, media, and location. In this post he turns his 8,400 rows of data into elegant visualizations and interesting analysis:

MikeShea_2014

A Year in Review of Personal Data, Should be, well, Personal. By Chris Dancy. As always, Chris has an interesting and entertaining post about his 2014 data and how it compares to 2013.

Tiny Preview By Lillian Karabaic. If her previous work is any indication this year’s review is going to be great. Keep in mind this is just a place holder until the full post is up.

Why #DIYPS N=1 data is significant (and #DIYPS is a year old!) by Dana Lewis. Along with her co-investigator, Scott Leibrand, Dana has been on a journey to better control, understand, and generate knowledge about her type 1 diabetes through augmenting CGM data, devices, and alerts. What started as project to make alarms more clear and useful has morphed into a full on DIY closed loop pancreas. In this post, Dana explores what they’ve learned over the last year of data collection. Truly inspiring work:

My Quantified Self Lessons Learned in 2014 by Paul LaFontaine. In this post Paul recounts what he’s learned from his various QS experiments during 2014, with a focus on stress and hear rate variability. Make sure to also take a peak at his 2014 Review and Gear Review.

2014 Year in Webcam and Screenshots by Stan James. We’ve featured Stan and his great LifeSlice project here on QuantifiedSelf.com before. It’s an ingenious little lifelogging application that tracks your computer use through webcam shots, self-assessments, and screenshots. Check out this post to see a fun representation of his data.

2014 by Kyle McDonald. A very interesting diary of a year.

What 2439 Reports Taught Me by Sam Bew. We highlighted this great post in our What We’re Reading a few weeks ago, but it deserves another mention here. Sam analyzes the data collected from using the Reporter iOS app and writes about what he learned.

2014 Personal Annual Report by Jehiah Czebotar. Coffee, travel, Citi bike trips, software development, laptop battery life, and webcam shots – all included in this amazing page. Presented without narrative or explanation, but meaningful nonetheless. The coffee consumption visualization is not to be missed (click through for the interactive version):JC_Coffee2

2014: My Year in Review by Sachin Monga. A mix of quantitative and qualitative data from Sachin.

My Q4 2014 Data Review by Brandon Corbin. While not a full “year in review” here, I still found this post compelling. Brandon created his own life tracking application, Nomie, and then crunched the numbers from the 60 different things he is tracking. Some great examples of learning from personal data in here.

20140101 – 20141231 (2014). Noah Kalina started taking a photo of himself on January 11, 2000. On the 15th anniversary of his “everyday” project he published his 2014 photos.

Reading
When I was spending late nights searching for variations on “2014”+”data”+”my year in review” I stumbled upon quite a few posts detailing reading stats. Here’s a good selection of what I can only assume is a big genre:

2014 Reading Stats and Data Sheets by Kelly Jensen. A great place to start if you want to track your own reading in 2015. Kelly provides links to three excellent spreadsheet examples.

My Year in Reading by Jon Page. Short and to the point, but a great exploration of format, genre, and authors.

My Year in Reading: 2014 by Annabel Smith.

My Year in Books, Unnecessarily Charted by Jane Bryony Rawson.

Well, that it for now. Special thanks to Beau Gunderson, Steven JonasNicholas Felton (and many others) for sending in links and tips on where to find many of the above mentioned work. If you have a data-driven year in review please reach our via email or twitter and we’ll add it to the list!

If you’re interested in learning about how people generate meaning from their own personal data we invite you to join us for our QS15 Global Conference. It’s a great place to share your experience, learn from others, and get inspired by leading experts in the growing Quantified Self Community. Early bird tickets are on sale. We hope to see you there.

If you’ve made it this far here’s a fun treat: Warby Parker made neat little tool you can use to generate a silly personal annual report.

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Jamie Williams: Exploring my Data

JaimeWilliams_FullFitbitData

Jamie Williams found himself with almost two years of self-tracking data including physical activity, blood pressure, and weight. Because of his interest in data visualization and coding he decided to learn how to access it the data and work on visualizing and understanding some of the trends and patterns. In this talk, presented at the QS St. Louis meetup group, he takes a deep dive into his activity and step data as well as his blood pressure data to learn about himself and what affects his behavior and associated data.

What Did Jamie Do?
Out of pure interest in seeing what the data would reveal, Jamie utilized a combination of devices to track his physical activity, blood pressure, heart rate, weight, numbers of drinks, and automobile travel. He then went on to explore ways in which he could pull down, integrate, visualize, and ultimately make sense of what he collected.

How Did He Do It?
In order to obtain his data on a minute-level resolution, Jamie had to email FitBit for a specialized use of their API. He then employed Mathematica to develop a number of (beautiful) visualizations of his activity – along with other key moments in his life (moving to St. Louis, changing job location, preparing for a Half Marathon, etc.). Jamie was able to compare his data not only to his peers through FitBit, but also to others of his demographic in the U.S. using the publicily available NHANES data set.

What Did He Learn?
Through Jamie’s Quantified Self collection and analysis efforts, he learned a lot not only about the patterns and changes in his activity, but why they were the case. He also presented great feedback about one’s mindset when comparing to peers vs. the general population.

Tools
Fitbit
Withing Blood Pressure Cuff
AskMeEvery.com
Automatic
Mathematica
D3.js
Python

Thank you to QS St. Louis organizer, William Dahl, and Jamie for the original posting of this talk!

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Kouris Kalligas: Analyzing My Weight and Sleep

Like anyone who has ever been bombarded with magazine headlines in a grocery store checkout line, Kouris Kalligas had a few assumptions about how to reduce his weight and improve his sleep. Instead of taking someone’s word for it, he looked to his own data to see if these assumptions were true. After building up months of data from his wireless scale, diet tracking application, activity tracking devices, and sleep app he spent time inputing that data into Excel to find out if there were any significant correlations. What he found out was surprising and eye-opening.

This video is a great example of our user-driven program at our Quantified Self Conferences. If you’re interest in tell your own self-tracking story, or want to hear real examples of how people use data in their lives we invite you to register for the QS15 Conference & Exposition.

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What We Are Reading

We hope you enjoy this week’s list!

Articles
Are Google making money from your exercise data?: Exercise activity as digital labour by Christopher Till. Christopher describes his recent paper, Exercise as Labour: Quantified Self and the Transformation of Exercise into Labour, which lays out a compelling argument for considering what happens when all of our exercise and activity data become comparable. Are we destined to become laborers producing an expanding commercialization of our physical activities and the data they produce?

How Big is the Human Genome? by Reid J. Robinson. Prompted by a recent conversation at QS Labs, I went looking for information about the size of the human genome. This post was one of the most clear descriptions I was able to find.

Show&Tell

VacationGPS
Visualizing Summer Travels by Geoff Boeing. A mix of Show&Tell and visualization here. Geoff is a graduate student and as part of his current studies he’s exploring mapping and visualization techniques. If you’re interested in mapping your personal GPS data, especially OpenPaths data, Geoff has posted a variety of tutorials you can use.

Visualizations

SymptomViz
Symptom Portraits by Virgil Wong. For 30 weeks Virgil met with patients and helped them turn their symptoms into piece of art work and data visualization.

Data Visualization Rules, 1915 by Ben Schmidt. In 1915, the US Bureau of the Census published a set of rules for graphic presentation. A great find by Ben here.

From the Forum
Moodprint
Measuring Cognitive Performance
Looking Forward to Experimenting

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Lee Rogers: Why Annual Reporting

Lee Rogers has been collecting data about himself for over three years. The daily checkins, movements, and other activities of his life are capture by automatic and passive systems and tools. What makes Lee a bit different than most is that he’s set up a personal automation system to collect and make sense of all that data. A big part of that system is creating an annual report every year that focuses on his goals and different methods to display and visualize the vast amount of information he’s collecting. In this talk, presented at the Bay Area QS meetup group, Lee explains his data collection and why he values these annual snapshots of his life.

You can read a transcript of Lee’s excellent talk here and view his 20112012, and 2013 reports on his website.

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Eric Jain on Sleep and Moon Phases

Eric Jain stumbled upon a study published in 2013 that found the a full moon was associated with less sleep. Being an avid self-tracker and a toolmaker he decided to find out if that was true for him as well. Eric used his tool, Zenobase, to import, aggregate, filter, and then analyze his sleep data in a few unique ways. While he found some evidence that a full moon was associated with less total sleep he wasn’t able to make any statistically significant results. Watch his short video below, filmed at the Seattle QS meetup group, then take a look at his great screencast where he walks through all his steps to complete this analysis.

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