Azure Grant

Azure Grant
Location
QS Labs Associate Editor
Posts

Meetups This Week

Screen Shot 2016-11-30 at 11.10.36 AM

Two meetups this week are happening on opposite sides of the U.S. If you’re interested in what happened at our conference in Amsterdam – or alternately what one man’s physiological response to seeing a bear was – then the Portland meetup is the place to be.

If you are on the East Coast, the D.C. meetup group has a great lineup of talks from students and faculty of John’s Hopkins University this Saturday. The meetup will host an introduction to tracking your metabolism and circadian rhythms by Tom Woolf, tracking your productivity with the OmniTrack platform by Eun Kyoung Choe, and insights from running and HR data.

To see when the next meetup in your area is, check the full list of the over 100 QS meetup groups in the right sidebar. Don’t see one near you? Why not start your own! If you are a QS Organizer and want some ideas for your next meetup, check out the myriad of meetup formats that other QS organizers are using here.

Tuesday, October 17

Portland

Saturday, October 21

Washington D.C.

Posted in Meetups | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Meetups This Week

mutw

Three meetups this week featuring show & tell talks, and in Manchester a fitness & diabetes risk assessment.

To see when the next meetup in your area is, check the full list of the over 100 QS meetup groups in the right sidebar. Don’t see one near you? Why not start your own! If you are a QS Organizer and want some ideas for your next meetup, check out the myriad of meetup formats that other QS organizers are using here.

 

Tuesday, October 3rd

Los Angeles, California

Manchester, London

Thursday, October 5th

Austin, Texas

 

 

Posted in Meetups | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Thomas Blomseth Christiansen: Over-Instrumented Running

Some More Instrumentation Thomas Blomseth Christiansen

 

“When in doubt, add more instrumentation.”

Have you ever felt that some parts of your life should remain unquantified? Perceived quality of your poetry, or perhaps duration of arguments with your significant other? Until recently, I kept running in my ‘not to be quantified’ bucket. It was such a meditative alone time that I didn’t want to risk disturbing it through observation. I tracked the kilometers I ran and nothing more.  That changed at the finish line of a recent 50k, where I learned that my wearable had overestimated the race distance by over 8 k! I was pretty miffed, and I turned to this talk for inspiration.

Thomas inhabits the far end of the quantified running spectrum. His talk from QS17 is a fun watch, and the project page is here.

What did he do? He started out  disappointed by hitting the wall midway through a marathon. This is common enough, but Thomas’ response to running a painfully positive split was to code his own negative split plan generator, rubber band split-plan sticky notes to his arm, and set out to run at a concrete pace. His project evolved to include an olympic swimming coach, many new devices, a metronome – and ultimately mastery of the art of pacing.

Posted in Conference, QS17, Videos | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mark Moschel: Blood Ketones During Regular Fasting

MarkMoschelWine-1Here’s proof that clarity and creativity are what make great data visualization. Mark’s illustrations show what he learned by combining mulitple-day fasts, ketone and glucose measurements and…wine.

He has generated several interesting personal insights, including some not yet published on: correlation of felt energy levels to blood ketone levels, the inverse relationship between ketones and glucose, and the ceiling effect of too-high ketones. I can’t find any publications on the wine-effect, so there may be a novel discovery in there as well. Check out Mark’s QS project page here.

I periodically become fascinated with ketosis, so the talk inspired me to revisit the topic of ketosis and prolonged fasting in women. The debate about the issue is intense, and there are relatively few publications that address women specifically. Have women in QS tried a similar experiment? What was your experience? We’ve started a forum post here on the topic.

Posted in Conference, QS17, Videos | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Meetups This Week

 

omg is this benjyWe have three meetups happening this Wednesday! If you’re in Hong Kong, check out an intro to self-tracking. If you’re in London, book a spot quickly (there are only two left) and head to Camden for QS talks and a walk to the pub. And if you’re in the Bay Area, the SF Women’s meetup is getting together for the first time in a while: bring something to share and join!

Wednesday, September 27

London, England

Hong Kong, China

QSXX – San Francisco, California

To see when the next meetup in your area is, check the full list of the over 100 QS meetup groups in the right sidebar. Don’t see one near you? Why not start your own! If you are a QS Organizer and want some ideas for your next meetup, check out the myriad of meetup formats that other QS organizers are using here.

 

Posted in Meetups | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Kyrill Potapov: Tracking Productivity for Personal Growth

Eddie_KyrilPotapov“Once one of Eddie’s leaves wilts, that’s it. A record of my failures right there among all the green leaves.”

In a show&tell talk that is as sweet as it is clever, Kyrill asks how his grandchildren might one day learn about him through digital family heirlooms and offers this unique project as an example.

Kyrill recently acquired his grandfather’s shaving razor and was struck by the connection he felt through the evidence of ownership: the darkened areas, worn edges and other traces of use.

Reflecting on his own mostly computer-based work, Kyrill noted how little of a physical trail he leaves in the world. Could his time and productivity data leave a mark on anything? Does he have a physical object, like his grandfather’s razor, that is indirectly shaped by his toil, besides a dirty keyboard?

Kyrill explored this idea by connecting the time-tracking service RescueTime to a light placed in a box with a house plant that he named Eddie. When he spends time on things he finds personally fulfilling, like working on his PhD, the light turns on and the plant grows. When he’s caught up in other activities, the leaves yellow and die.

The arrangement adds a new dimension to his productivity data. Every couple of days, Kyrill opens the box to water the plant. This ritual provides an opportunity to take stock on how he has been using his time, based on the condition of the plant. Embodied in this living organism is his failures to stay on task and focus on what’s important. Distractions take on a new threat. Rather than just endangering his goals, they now threaten the health of Eddie.

Although Kyrill won’t be able to leave a houseplant to his descendants, it’s a worthwhile meditation on how different modes of presenting personal data can have a profound difference in the way it engages one’s emotions.

You can watch Kyrill’s talk at his QS Project page. You can read about how Kyrill  connected RescueTime to a lamp here.

Posted in Conference, QS17, Videos | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Jakob Eg Larsen: Tracking Sleep and Resting Heart Rate

JakobLarsenRHRdata

Jakob Eg Larsen has tracked his sleep and resting heart rate (RHR) for the past four years. His 7 minute talk is far better watched than read about: it’s a great illustration of data validation, longitudinal tracking, and data assisted self-awareness.

Briefly, by tracking his RHR over a long period of time, Jakob has developed an intuition for connections between his RHR and physiological state. He’s able to use the data to tune his self-awareness, but still keep a safety net when unexpected RHR elevations might portend a flu. To boot, the years of data across the Fitbit Blaze, Oura ring and Basis are one of the most extensive within-individual comparisons I can find anywhere of these devices.

You can watch the full video of Jakob’s talk at his QS Project page.

Posted in Conference, QS17, Videos | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Cantor Soule-Reeves: Fight For Your Right to Recess

Cantor

It rains a lot in Portland, Oregon. And if you’re 8 years old like Cantor, recess gets cancelled a lot. But unlike most 8-year-olds, Cantor is doing something about that.

By tracking his steps, he’s able to show that every cancelled recess takes about 600 steps out of his day. Compared to his average of ~15,000 steps a day, it might not sound like a lot, but Cantor and his mom Bethany hope it might be enough to change his elementary school’s policy for rainy-day restrictions.

We don’t typically see young children doing serious self-tracking, especially with such an altruistic (and downright cool) aim of fighting for more recess time. We have our fingers crossed, both for the school’s response and for seeing more projects like Cantor’s in the future. Check out Cantor’s talk at QS Project page.

Posted in Conference, QS17, Videos | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Meetups This Week

_N0A4097crop

We have three meetups in the States this week. Our Bay Area meetup is honored to be participating in the Davies Forum at The University of San Francisco. The evening will consist of a special presentation from Gary Wolf (co-founder of Quantified Self), self tracking presentations, tool demonstrations, and a conversation about the Quantified Self. The Austin meetup will be hosting a TED talk movie night, and Seattle’s Institute of Systems Biology will be hosting show&tells.
Thursday, September 7
Friday, September 8
To see when the next meetup in your area is, check the full list of the over 100 QS meetup groups in the right sidebar. Don’t see one near you? Why not start your own! If you are a QS Organizer and want some ideas for your next meetup, check out the myriad of meetup formats that other QS organizers are using here.
Posted in Meetups | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Announcing Blood Testers: A Collaborative QS Project

cholesterol_testing
At the 2017 Quantified Self Global Conference, we met to discuss a collaborative QS project that we’re calling, “Blood Testers.” Our immediate goal is to learn more about ourselves from high frequency self-testing of our blood lipids (i.e., cholesterol and triglycerides). Our long-term goal is to advance progress in self-directed research by better understanding what makes these types of projects succeed or fail.

In most Quantified Self projects, one person does almost all of the work, perhaps with a bit of advice from friends and online feedback. But what if you could work in a group of people with varied skills to explore questions you developed through conversation and collaboration? Everyone can pose questions and determine for themselves what data they want to collect, but can also benefit from others’ unique skills, compare results, and team up to tackle challenges like device validation and data analysis.  The idea isn’t to take control away from the individual, but to provide resources that connect the community through developing shared methods.

Research is typically conducted in university laboratories, and medical tests are usually performed in clinics. The human subject and the patient are largely isolated from the development of research and healthcare. The result is a divide: those meant to benefit from research largely do not participate in, or understand it. The experiences of the Quantified Self community, however, have convinced us that the ability to reason about a problem using evidence is not a narrowly professional skill. Many people can do it. We’re interested in testing our process of collaborative self-tracking and seeing if it can lead to new personal knowledge about our cardiovascular health. Designing a new way to share expertise, lighten individual burden, and increase project quality is a non-trivial problem that will continue to evolve and challenge us. We hope to make a contribution by offering a worked example of a kind of discovery that is informed by ‘expert’ individuals, highly participatory, and open access.

Our Plan

In fall 2017, a group of QSers from our breakout session in Amsterdam will receive a package in the mail containing an at-home lipid test kit. Expenses for the tests and setting up the project are being paid by our sponsor, Amgen. Through in-person meetings, webinars, and one-on-one online chats, participants will engage in three questions.

  • The first revolves around the nature of the project: What can we learn about ethical review, experimental design, execution, analysis and presentation by working in a group? 
  • The second question is scientific and one the group will answer together by conducting the same experiment: Given that lipids change over hours and days, but are normally measured but once per year, can we learn something new about our health by mapping these high-frequency changes? 
  • The third question will elucidate both process and personal lipid physiology: Each participant will design and execute a project of personal interest using insights gained during the first experiment. 

Both process and projects will be shared with the community over the next few months via posts here. We hope you’ll observe this process with us from start to finish (click the “bloodtesters” tag at the bottom of the article to see all related posts), and learn with us about the challenges and successes to be had in the process.

(Photo by Bob Troia)

Posted in Group Experiments | Tagged , | Leave a comment