Tag Archives: BodyMedia

What We Are Reading

It’s link-apolooza time! Enjoy these great news pieces, blog posts, personal data stories, and visualizations.

Articles

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Launches Initiative to Assess How Data Can Be Used to Improve Health by RWJF Staff. Some exciting news coming out of RWJF this week about their new program to explore how individuals and communities are using health data and information. Don’t forget to read the accompanying blog post to learn more.

“For These Times”: Dickens on Big Data by Irina Raicu. Who knew the philosophical debate on a life governed by measurable facts had such a pedigree!

How and Why We Are Working with the FDA: Background and a Brief Summary of the Recent Meeting with the FDA about the Nightscout Project by Scott Leibrand. We’re big fans of the Nightscout project here at QS Labs. It’s great to seem them moving forward with a productive dialogue with the FDA.

Sir Tim Berners-Lee Speaks Out on Data Ownership by Alex Hern.

The data we create about ourselves should be owned by each of us, not by the large companies that harvest it, Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the world wide web, said today.

Sensors and Sensibility by Andrew Leonard. One day we might look back at our fears of insurers nefariously using our data to adjust premiums. Until then, that fear is alive and real. Thorough reporting here from the new Backchannel.

One Quantified Self App To Rule Them All by Chris Roth. As Chris explored the growing QS space and worked on his own open-source logging app he noticed a few things. Read on to see his take on where the space should be evolving.

Quantified Health and Software Apps by Sara K. Moir. What started as a Tweetstorm about her experience with MyFitnessPal expanded into a great exploration about what it means to be a user (and designer) of health behavior tracking tools.

Show&Tell

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How Text Messages Change from Dating to Marriage by Alice Zhao. Only a data scientist would celebrate a six-year anniversary with a thoughtful and thorough analysis of their communication. Alice did a great job here showing what’s changed over the years as her and her husband have moved from courtship to marriage.

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Losing 58.3 Lbs For Science by Zachary Townsend. Zachary just finished up his participation in the One Diet Does Not Fit All: Weight Loss study. Over the last year he’s lost nearly 60lbs and learned a lot about himself and his diet.

Using JSL to import BodyMedia Fit Activity monitor data into JMP by Shannon Conners. We featured Shannon’s amazing visualization work in our September 20th edition of What We’re Reading. She returns here with a thorough how-to on how to explore BodyMedia and MyFitnessPal data in JMP. Even as a non-JMP user I was delighted to find out about the MyFitnessPal Data Downloader Chrome Extension she used to download her meal data.

Visualizations
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My Up Skyline for the Week by Abe Gong. Abe is a data scientist at Jawbone was taking a look at his own activity data and decided to use the then new Jawbone API to download his data and make some interesting visualizations.

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Your Life on Earth by the BBC. Not a typical QS visualization, but unique and interesting to see what’s happened in and around the world over the course of your life.

I’ve been exploring upgrading my data visualization skills by learning D3. If you’re in the same boat or want know someone who is then you can point them towards this great intro from the engineers at Square.

From the Forum

Decode Your Chronic Illness
The Ethics of QS
Tasks & Measures
Lifelogging to Prevent Depression
Wearable Body Temperature Tool
Sleep Apnea Treatments
Looking for Android Time Tracking App

Today’s Number is 35: The age of the spreadsheet!

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Christel De Maeyer: My Journey With Sleep Monitoring

Like many people, Christel de Maeyer felt that her sleep could be better. Presenting at our 2013 conference in Europe, Christel shares what she learned from collecting over three years of sleep data.


What did Christel do?
Christel tracked her sleep for 2 years with various devices. She tested the effects of different variables on her sleep quality, including consumption of alcohol, keeping a consistent wake time and changing her mattress.

How did she do it?
She used the Zeo to track sleep for two years, before switching over to a BodyMedia device. While making changes she monitored how her sleep data changed, as well as how she felt.

What did she learn?
Before self-tracking, Christel felt that she woke up frequently during the night, and the Zeo confirmed this. On average she woke up around 8 to 9 times. She suspected the mattress could be part of the problem. After considerable research, she replaced her mattress (to one that had a foam top), successfully reducing her wake-ups to 4 or 5.

Christel discovered that her sleep patterns looked significantly different after just two glasses of alcohol. Her REM diminishes to nearly 0% (though deep sleep seems unaffected).

Christel also found that total sleep time was less important for how she felt the next day than the combination of REM and deep sleep. Even if she only sleeps for six hours, as long as she gets at least 2 hours of combined REM/deep sleep, she feels good.

In addition to these findings and others she explores in the video above, Christel has taken her lessons and now helps others with sleeping issues. You can find more at her website.

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What We Are Reading

We hope you enjoy this week’s list!

Articles
Big Data in the 1800s in surgical science: A social history of early large data set development in urologic surgery in Paris and Glasgow by Dennis J Mazur. An amazing and profoundly interesting research paper tracing the use of “large numbers” in medical science. Who knew that is all began with bladder stones!

Civil Rights, Big Data, and our Algorithmic Future by Aaron Rieke, David Robinson and Harlan Yu. A very thorough and thoughtful report on the role of data in civil and social rights issues. The report focuses on four areas: Financial Inclusion, Jobs, Criminal Justice, and Government Data Collection and Use.

Caution in the Age of the Quantified Self by J. Travis Smith. If you’ve been following the story of self-tracking, data privacy, and data sharing this article won’t be all that surprising. Still, I can’t help but read with fascination the reiteration of tracking fears, primarily a fear of higher insurance premiums.

Patient Access And Control: The Future Of Chronic Disease Management? by Dr. Kaveh Safavi. This article is focused on providing and improving access and control of medical records for patients, but it’s only a small mental leap to take the arguments here and apply them all our personal data. (Editors note: If you haven’t already, we invite you to take some time and read our report: Access Matters.)

Perspectives of Patients with Type 1 or Insulin-Treated Type 2 Diabetes on Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose: A Qualitative Study by Johanna Hortensius, Marijke Kars, and Willem Wierenga, et al. Whether or not you have experience with diabetes you should spend some time reading about first hand experiences with self-monitoring. Enlightening and powerful insights within.

Show&Tell
Building a Sleep Tracker for Your Dog Using Tessel and Twilio by Ricky Robinett. Okay, maybe not strictly a show&tell here, but this was too fun not to share. Please, if you try this report back to us!

Digging Into my Diet and Fitness Data with JMP by Shannon Conners, PhD. Shannon is a software development manager at JMP, a statical software company. In this post she describes her struggle with her weight and her experience with using a BodyMedia Fit to track her activity and diet for four years. Make sure to take some time to check out her amazing poster linked below!

Visualizations
The following two visualizations are part of Shannon Conners’ excellent poster detailing her analysis of data derived from almost four years of tracking (December 2010 through July 2014). The poster is just excellent and these two visualizations do not do it justice. Take some time to explore it in detail!

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Tracking Energy use at home by reddit user mackstann.

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“The colors on the calendar represent the weather, and the circles represent how much power was used that day. The three upper charts are real-time power usage charts, over three different time spans. I use a Raspberry Pi and an infrared sensor that is taped onto my electric meter. The code is on github but it’s not quite up to date (I work on it in bits and pieces as time permits I have kids).”

From the Forum
Help With Livestrong Data Export
Need Help Deciding Which Device
New to Fitness Tracking

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Nick Alexander on Running in the Cold

Science. Someone makes an observation, creates a hypothesis, tests it, then analyzes the results against the hypothesis. Hopefully once a conclusion is reached it is tested again and again for validity and reproducibility. With self-tracking, the world of personal science and experimentation is opening up real-world personal laboratories to test the findings, claims, and promises available through the popular and scientific literature.

Nick Alexander is one of these self-experimenters. When he started to hear about thermodynamics and the effect of temperature on exercise and energy expenditure he decided to set up his own experiment:

I had been introduced to thermodynamics exercise research by former NASA scientistRay Cronise via Wired and the Four Hour Body. Ray makes an extraordinary claim (i.e. that exercising in a cold environment, especially in cold water, causes a large increase in calorie burn), and I was curious to see if it would work for me.

In this talk, given at the 2013 Quantified Self Global Conference, Nick explains his experimental setup and what he found after tracking over 30 runs and crunching the numbers. For a more in-depth discussion about his methodology and his findings I recommend reading his recaps.

This video is from our 2013 Global Conference, a unique gathering of toolmakers, users, inventors, and entrepreneurs. If you’d like see talks like this in person we invite you to join us in Amsterdam for our 2014 Quantified Self Europe Conference on May 10 and 11th.

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What would you do with a free BodyMedia armband?

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What would you do if you had access to accurate galvanic skin response (GSR), skin temperature, heat flux, and 3-axis accelerometer data, as well as processed data estimating calorie burn, physical activity levels, steps, and sleep? We are holding a contest over in our QS Forum to provoke good questions that can be answered with our data. And there’s a prize.

Why do this? One of the things I’ve learned moderating Quantified Self show&tell talks over the last five years is that the most interesting and inspiring projects depend first on interesting questions. The data, visualization, and analysis is important, of course. But the meaning rests on having a good question, on personal curiosity and interest.

In conjunction with our upcoming QS Europe Conference in Amsterdam on May 11/12, our friends at BodyMedia have agreed to donate a complete personal SenseWear System (retail price $2,500), a state-of-the-art wearable sensor that allows raw data output. That’s going to be our prize. So if you have good questions, we can supply you with a way to collect the data.

To be clear: we care about your question, not your technical skills. I know that getting this much data about yourself can be intimidating. But data analysis and visualization skills are very high in the QS Community, and we can help you find technical support.

So if you have an interesting question or project that you would like to pursue, please describe it in this thread on the QS Forum. The winning idea will be chosen by QS Labs based on its ability to inspire others in the QS community. We will be having a breakout session at the upcoming conference where we discuss the projects posted to the thread.

Go here to post your proposal:

QS FORUM - What would you do with a free Bodymedia Sensewear Armband?

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