Tag Archives: diversity

Inclusion and Diversity at QS15

Today we’re happy to announce that we’re opening up a scholarship application for the QS15 Conference and Exposition. Since our first conference in 2011 our aim has been to foster an inclusive environment, and with the help and guidance from many attendees we’ve benefited greatly from exposing ourselves to the wide range of ideas about what it means to get “personal meaning from personal data.”

Last year, thanks to the leadership of our own longtime friend and collaborator, Amelia Greenhall, we published our first anti-harassment policy for the 2013 QS Global Conference. We leaned heavily on the great work of the Ada Initiative to make sure that our event attendees were supported and protected. We were further inspired by QS Boston and QSXX Boston organizer, Maggie Delano, to implement a code of conduct in order to make sure that our meetups are a welcoming place where community members can come together and safely share and learn from each other.

Opening up this scholarship application is an continuation of these ongoing efforts to support diversity and openness. We’re taking cues from other exemplary events such as Portland’s XOXO Conference & Festival and listening to thoughtful leaders in our community. QS15 is not your typical tech-focused event, our conferences never have been. They’re special because they’re attendee-driven. The community guides the program by sharing their self-tracking experiences and facilitating discussions on a wide range of topics. It makes sense to turn our beliefs on inclusion and diversity into action by welcoming and supporting those who have typically been underrepresented in our events and the broader techno-culture. These efforts also reflect our mission to support access. We’re currently in the early stages of a new effort to encourage and communicate about the importance of personal data access (see our QS Access App here). But access doesn’t have to stop at being able to download a CSV file. Access to our community of leaders, exemplary users, toolmakers, and researchers matters too.

If you identify with a group that has been underrepresented and would like to attend the QS15 Conference and Exposition we want to hear from you. We’ve made a simple application form for you to fill out so you can tell us a little about yourself. We’ll be reviewing applications as they come in. Because the conference is attendee-drive we place an emphasis on those would like to contribute to the program. We run our conferences on a shoestring, but this year we are going to do what we can to provide both registration and travel grants in this program.

Apply for a Diversity and Inclusion Scholarship

We invite you to help support this program. When you register for the conference you’ll see a additional registration field marked “Donation.” We are grateful for your support, at any amount.

We’re experimenting with moving our comments from the blog to our QS Forum. To discuss this post we invite you to join the forum thread here

Posted in Conference | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

What We’re Reading

It’s a long one today, so buckle in and get ready for some great stuff!

Articles
The Quantified Self: Bringing Science into Everyday Life, One Measurement at a Time by Jessica Wilson. This piece, from the Science in Society Office at Northwestern University, explores the Quantified Self movement, with a particular focus on the local Chicago QS meetup. Always interesting to see how individuals draw distinctions between self-tracking projects and “real science.”

Diversity of Various Tech Companies By the Numbers by Nick Heer. Recently Apple released data about the diversity of their employee workforce. This marked the last major tech company to publish data about diversity. In this short post Nick takes that data and shows how it compares to data from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Interested in more than just the big six listed here? Check out this great site for more tech company diversity data (Hat tip to Mark Allen for finding that link!)

Intel Explores Wearables for Parkinson’s Research by Christina Farr, Reuters. Intel is in the news lately based on their interest in developing and using their technological prowess for qs-related activities. In this post/press release, they describe how they’re partnering with the Michael J. Fox Foundation to explore how they can use wearable devices to track and better understand patients with Parkinson’s Disease. It appears they’re also working to get their headphone heart rate tracking technology out to market.

Spying on Myself by Richard J. Anderson. I’m always interested in how people talk to themselves about self-tracking. This short essay describes the tools that Richard uses and why he continues or discontinues using them. His follow up is also a must read.

Dexcom Mac Dance by Kerri Sparling. You know we’re fascinated by the techniques and tools developed and refined by the the diabetes community. In this short post, Kerri highlights the work of Brian Bosh, who developed a Chrome extension to access and download data from Dexcom continuous glucose monitors on a Mac. (Bonus link: Listen to Chris Snider’s great podcast episode where he talks to John Costik, one of the originators of the CGM in the Cloud/Nightscout project.)

Show&Tell
The Three-Year Long Time Tracking Experiment by Lighton Phiri. Lighton is a graduate student at the University of Capetown. In 2011 he became curious about how he was spending his time. After installing a time-tracking tool on his various computers, he started gathering data. Recently, after 3 years of tracking, he downloaded and analyzed his data. Read this excellent post to find out what he learned.

Experimenting with Sleep by Gwern. One of our favorite self-experimenters is back with some more detailed analysis of his various sleep tracking experiments. Read on to see what he learned about how caffeine pills, alcohol, bedtime, and wake uptime affects his sleep.

QS Bits and Bobs by Adam Johnson. Adam gave talk at a recent QS Oxford Meetup about his lifelogging and self-tracking, his custom tools for importing data to his calendar, and what he’s learned from his experiences. Make sure to also check out the neat tool he’s developed to log events to Google Calendar.

Visualizations

NikeFibers
FuelBand Fibers by Variable. A design team was given Nike FuelBand data from seven different runners and created this interesting visualization of their daily activity.

SleepWork
I don’t Sleep That Well: A Year of Logging When I Sleep and When I’m at Work by Reddit user mvuljlst. Posting on the r/dataisbeautiful subreddit, this user tracked a year of their sleep and location data using Sleepbot and Moves. If you have similar data and are interested in exploring your own visualization the code is also available.

JawboneCity
In the City that We Love by Brian Wilt/Jawbone. The data science team at Jawbone continues to impress with their production of meaningful and interesting data visualizations based on data from UP users. In this post and corresponding visualizations they explore the daily patterns of people from around the world. Make sure to read the technical notes!

From the Forum
Export Moves Data to Day One
Understanding Patents – All your transmission data belong to us
Quantified Self, It’s Benefits
Sun Exposure and Vitamin D Levels Wearable Tracker

Want to receive the weekly What We Are Reading posts in your inbox? We’ve set up a simple newsletter just for you. Click here to subscribe.  Do you have a self-tracking story, visualization, or interesting link you want to share? Submit it now!

Posted in What We're Reading | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment