Tag Archives: FitBit

How to Download Minute-by-Minute Fitbit Data

IntradayDataChart

Earlier this week we posted an update to our How To instructions for downloading your Fitbit data to Google Spreadsheets. This has been one of our most popular posts over the past few years. One of the most common requests we’ve received is to publish a guide to help people download and store their minute-by-minute level step and activity data. Today we’re happy to finally get that up.

The ability to access and download the minute-by-minute level (what Fitbit calls “intraday”) data requires one more step than what we’ve covered previously for downloading your daily aggregate data. Access to the intraday data is restricted to individuals and developers with access to the “Partner API.” In order to use the Partner API you must email the API team at Fitbit to request access and let them know what you intend to do with that data. Please note that they appear to encourage and welcome these type of requests. From their developer documentation:

Fitbit is very supportive of non-profit research and personal projects. Commercial applications require additional review and are subject to additional requirements. To request access, email api at fitbit.com.

In the video and instructions below I’ll walk you through setting up and using the Intraday Script to access and download your minute-by-minute Fitbit Data.

  1. Set up your FitBit Developer account and register an app.
    • Go to dev.fitbit.com and sign in using your FitBit credentials.
    • Click on the “Register an App” at the top right corner of the page.
    • Fill in your application information. You can call it whatever you want.
    • Make sure to click “Browser” for the Application Type and “Read Only” for the Default Access type fields.
    • Read the terms of service and if you agree check the box and click “Register.”
  2. Request Access to the Partner API
    • Email the API team at Fitbit
    • They should email you back within a day or two with  response
  3. Copy the API keys for the app you registered in Step 1
    • Go to dev.fitbit.com and sign in using your FitBit credentials.
    • Click on “Manage My Apps” at the top right corner of the page
    • Click on the app you created in Step 1
    • Copy the Consumer Key.
    • Copy the Consumer Secret.
    • You can save these to a text file, but they are also available anytime you return to dev.fitbit.com by clicking on the “Manage my Apps” tab.
  4. Set up your Google spreadsheet and script
    • Open your Google Drive
    • Create a new google spreadsheet.
    • Go to Tools->Script editor
    • Download this script, copy it’s contents, and paste into the script editor window. Make sure to delete all text in the editor before pasting. You can then follow along with the instructions below.
    • Select “renderConfigurationDialog” in the Run drop down menu. Click run (the right facing triangle).
    • Authorize the script to interact with your spreadsheet.
    • Navigate to the spreadsheet. You will see an open a dialog box in your spreadsheet.
    • In that dialog paste the Consumer Key and Consumer Secret that you copied from your application on dev.fitbit.com. Click “Save”
    • Navigate back to the scrip editor window.
    • Select “authorize” in the Run drop down menu. Click run (the right facing triangle).
    • Select “authorize” in the Run drop down menu. This will open a dialog box in your spreadsheet. Click yes.
    • A new browser window will open and ask you to authorize the application to look at your Fitbit data. Click allow to authorize the spreadsheet script.
  5. Download your Fitbit Data
    • Go back to your script editor window.
    • Edit the DateBegin and DateEnd variables with the date period you’d like to download. Remember, this script will only allow 3 to 4 days to be downloaded at a time. 
    • Select “refreshTimeSeries” in the Run drop down menu. Click run (the right facing triangle).
    • Your data should be populating the spreadsheet!

If you’re a developer or have scripting skills we welcome your help improving this intraday data script. Feel free to check out the repo on Github!

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Downloading Fitbit Data: Update

We’re posting a quick note today to let you know that we’ve updated our “How To Download Your Fitbit Data” post. It now included separate instructions for both the old and new versions of Google Spreadsheets. This is just the first in a series of planned updates. We hope to post additional updates to allow you to have deeper access to your Fitbit data including, heart rate, blood pressure, and daily goal data.

If you’re using this how-to we’d love to hear from you! Are you learning something new? Making interesting data visualizations? Discussing the data with your health care team? Let us know. You can email us or post here in the comments.

ERFitbit_092214

Click to view the interactive version.

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Kouris Kalligas: Analyzing My Weight and Sleep

Like anyone who has ever been bombarded with magazine headlines in a grocery store checkout line, Kouris Kalligas had a few assumptions about how to reduce his weight and improve his sleep. Instead of taking someone’s word for it, he looked to his own data to see if these assumptions were true. After building up months of data from his wireless scale, diet tracking application, activity tracking devices, and sleep app he spent time inputing that data into Excel to find out if there were any significant correlations. What he found out was surprising and eye-opening.

This video is a great example of our user-driven program at our Quantified Self Conferences. If you’re interest in tell your own self-tracking story, or want to hear real examples of how people use data in their lives we invite you to register for the QS15 Conference & Exposition.

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What We Are Reading

Enjoy this week’s list!

Articles
Effect of Self-monitoring and Medication Self-titration on Systolic Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Patients at High Risk of Cardiovascular Disease by Richard McManus et al. An interesting research paper here about using self-monitoring to reduce blood pressure. The paper is behind a paywall, but since you’re nice we’ve put a copy here.

Apple Prohibits HealthKit App Developers From Selling Health Data by Mark Sullivan. Some interesting news here from Apple in advance of their new phone and possible device release in a few weeks. I applaud the move, but would like to see more information about data portability in the next release.

Science Advisor, Larry Smarr by 23andMe. Great to hear our friends 23andMe and Larry Smarr are getting together to help work on understanding Inflammatory Bowel Disease. If you’ve been diagnosed with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis consider joining the study.

Personal Health Data: It’s Amazing Potential and Privacy Perils by Beth Kanter. A lot of people have been talking recently about the privacy implications of using different tracking tools and technologies. In this short post Beth opens up some interesting questions about why we might or might not open up our personal data to others. Make sure to read through for some insightful comments as well.

Show&Tell
Let’s Talk About 3 Months of Self-Quantifying by Frank Rousseau. Frank is one of the founders of Cozy Cloud, a personal could service. He’s also designed Kyou a custom tracker system built on top of Cozy. He’s also been using the services to track his life. In this post he explain how tracking his activity, sleep, weight, and other habits led to some interesting insights about his behavior.

The iPhone 5S’ M7 Predictor as a Predictor of Fitbit Steps by Zach Jones. A great post here by Zach as he explores the data taken from his iPhone 5S vs. his Fitbit.

Using Open Data to Predict When You Might Get Your Next Parking Ticket by Ben Wellington. Not strictly a personal data show&tell here, but as someone who suffers from street sweeping parking tickets somewhat frequently I found this post fascinating. Now to see if Los Angeles has open data…

Visualizations
RWTime
What Time of Day Do People Run? by Robert James Reese, Dan Fuehrer, and Christine Fennessay. Runners World and Runkeeper partnered to understand the running habits of runners around the world. Some interesting insights here!

FitbitMin
What Happens When You Graduate and Get a Real Job by Reddit user matei1987. A really neat visualization of min-by-min level Fitbit step data.

DataDesign
Data + Design by Infoactive and the Donald W. Reynolds Institute. A really interesting and unique take on a data visualization book. This CC-licensed, open source, and collaborative project represents the work of many volunteers. I’ve only read through a few chapters, but it seems to be a wonderful resource for anyone working in data visualization.

From the Forum
Good Morning World!
Quantified Chess
New Activity Tracker to Replace BodyMedia?
Indirect Mood Measures
OPI TrueSense for Sleep Tracking

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Jan-Geert Munneke on Tracking Snoring and Sleep

Jan-Geert Munneke has had an issue with snoring for quite a while. He started off his self-tracking journey by tracking his snoring with the Snore Lab app. Having this data led him to think about how he could understand what was going on while he was sleeping. So, he decided to incorporate more sensors to better track his sleep. In this talk, from our 2013 Quantified Self Europe Conference, Jan-Geert describes what he found from combining data from different devices and how it’s inspired him to think about how he could track other aspects of his sleep.

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What We Are Reading

We’re back with another great set of articles, show&tells, and visualizations for you.

Articles
How to Make Government Data Sites Better by Nathan Yau. Government entities are some of the largest holders of interesting data. Nathan focuses this article on the difficulties of accessing and making sense of data from the United States Centers for Disease Control and offers some good ideas on how to make it better.

Project Eavesdrop: An Experiment At Monitoring My Home Office by Steve Henn. What happens when you start monitoring yourself in the same manner the NSA might be doing? The author employs some technical help to learn what data leaks are possible and what you can figure out from your digital trails.

Sitting is Bad for You. So I Stopped. For a Whole Month. by Dan Kols. As a past frequent user of a treadmill desk and a sedentary behavior researcher I found this article intriguing. Yes, a bit silly in nature, but an interesting look at what happens when you go to the extreme. I especially enjoyed the integration of personal tracking in the piece.

The Future of Biosensing Wearables by Rock Health. Our friends at Rock Health did some great research on where personal sensing is going.

Show&Tell
Analyzing Squash Performance Using Fitbit by Ben Sidders. Ben sought out to see if he could learn anything from his step data to improve his squash playing. In this post he explains how he used R to access his data and plot it against his squash records, which he also records.

My Life As Seen Through Fitbit. Reddit user, VisionsofStigma, plots a year and a half of Fitbit data to find out what is related to the rise and fall of his activity.

Visualizations
histogramFitbitFreeing My Fitbit Data by Bonnie Barrilleaux. Bonnie used our instructions for accessing Fitbit data in Google Spreadsheets then used Python to visualize her data. I especially like the histogram pictured at left. If you want to visualize your Fitbit data, she’s included her code in the post.

 

 

 

diurnalFitbitDiurnal Plot of Fitbit Data by Matthew Gaudet. Matthew was inspired by the diurnal plots from Stephen Wolfram’s in-depth personal data review. He implemented the same methods to better understand his activity.

 

 

 

iconHistoryIconic History by Shan Huang. As part of a the Interactive and Computational Design class at Carnegie Mellon University, Shan created a Chrome browser extension that visualizes your browser history. More about the project here.

 

 

 

lastfmAlbumsVisualizing Last.fm History by Andy Cotgreave. Andy has been using Last.fm since 2006 to track his music listening activity. As a data scientist he was interested in what he could learned from all that data. In this four-part series, he explores his data along side data from eight of his friends. (If you want explore your Last.fm data you can export it using this awesome CSV export tool.)

 

 

From the Forum
23andMe Data Analysis Tools

Track Your Phone Addiction

Just Want To Track Hours in Bed

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Fit Fifties, Sound Sixties: Maria Benet on Active Aging

Maria Benet began tracking her activity a few years ago as a way to lose weight and take control of her health. What started with a simple pedometer and a few custom Access databases has morphed into a multi-year tracking project that includes news apps and tools. Her progress and data has even spurred her on to new experiences and athletic endeavors. Watch her talk, filmed at the Bay Area QS meetup group, and read the transcript below.

(Editors Note: We’re excited to have Maria attending the 2014 Quantified Self Europe Conference where we hope to hear an updated version of this wonderful talk.)

What did I do?

Hi, my name is Maria Benet and I am happy to tell you that only about two-thirds of me is here to talk about my tracking project. I mean that literarily, because in the 10 years since I’ve been self-tracking I lost over 50 pounds while getting fitter.

In my early 50s, I was overweight, out of shape, with bad knees, and when not cranky, depressed. I was already on meds for high blood pressure and was looking at the prospect of more prescriptions down the road.

So, what did I do to change my situation? I set about tracking my activity levels, my weight and my food intake with the help of apps, wearable devices – plus — in databases and Excel spreadsheets that I designed. Until late 2011, I tracked inconsistently, but once I discovered mobile apps and wearable devices — I became more systematic and consistent about tracking weight, food intake, and fitness data.

How did I do it? 

When I first started — losing 50 pounds seemed daunting, but going for a walk at least 5 days a week seemed less formidable. To track walks I was going to take in the hilly neighborhood where I live, I created a simple Access database.

I bought a pedometer, hiking shoes, and off I went. After walking, I recorded the duration, the number of steps, and calculated the distances I covered. I also charted my routes by naming the streets, and made notes about the weather and my mood during the walk.

Recording the data turned out to be a form of reward in itself. At the start of this tracking project, I enjoyed seeing the database grow a little more than I enjoyed the actual walks themselves.

Over time, the walks got longer, steeper, and eventually included actual hikes. I also took up the practice of Yoga regularly, and then added Pilates to my exercise repertoire.

Along the way, I also started to lose weight. Though I didn’t weigh myself every day, I began to pay attention to the kinds of foods I ate and tried to wean myself off processed foods in general.

They say you get fit in the gym, but lose weight in the kitchen. In September 2011, when I discovered LoseIt, it became my virtual kitchen: LoseIt helped me see what foods I ate regularly, which of these spiked my weight, even if my calorie intake stayed the same. I noticed these relationships anecdotally, rather than by finding statistical correlations between them.

Tracking in LoseIt helped me realize that as much as I love bread and beer, they are not my friends. Two years ago, an allergist confirmed my wheat sensitivity through blood tests and an elimination diet.

I added Endomondo to my tool box a few months later, since I liked having the maps and stats it offered, in addition to the other data it showed. By December I also added a Fitbit, as with it I could track more accurately how many steps I took and approximate better the number of calories I burned. The Fitbit was like going back to the pedometer, but to one on steroids.

With the Fitibit, I focus mostly on the Very Active Minutes it claims to measure. Increasing that number over time became a game. In 2012, I was averaging about 57 minutes a day, which put me in the 98th percentile. Increasing to 69 minutes only brought me to the 99th percentile, as the Fitbit population also has increased over time.

The Fitbit turned out to be a catalytic tool, because it spurred me on to push the perceived limits of my fitness abilities and possibilities further. It ended up putting wheels under my dreams.

In the spring of 2012,I took up cycling to increase my active minutes and challenge a mental habit of opting out of things because of a fear of failure or thinking of them as not age appropriate. Biking, in turn, added to my collection of gadgets and apps for tracking the metrics involved.

By 2012 then, in addition to LoseIt and Fitbit, I was tracking workouts with a Garmin GPS watch with a HR monitor and my bike rides with a Garmin Edge computer, uploading the data to the Garmin site, to Endomondo and Strava, as each had strengths the other lacked, from my perspective.

To complicate data gathering, back in January 2012, I started a basic Excel spreadsheet that tracks highlights from each of these apps in an application-independent reference for me. In Excel I track the type of activity, duration, distance, if applicable, average and maximum heart rate, Strava suffer points, (a measure of exertion), the hours I slept and how that sleep seemed to me, and additional notes about the day I might think relevant.

The plethora of my gadgets and apps might earn me an entry into the next edition of The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. But exploring these tools was, and still is, my way of looking for a comprehensive and personalized way to track the quantities in my habits and activities that make for a qualitative difference in my life … which brings me to what I learned so far:

What did I learn?

I learned that small quantitative changes in particular daily habits add up to a big difference in quality of life in general.

The incremental additions in my tracking methods and number of gadgets I added produced a lot of data, which I haven’t analyzed closely, because I was already getting a lot of return from them in the form of new experiences in my life.

The most memorable of these experiences is my having completed the metric century ride on the Tour de Fuzz in Sonoma last September. In the space of a little over a year I went from covering barely 8 miles in an hour on my first rides to completing 63 miles in 5 and ½ hours and feeling ready to ride a lot more.

It has been said that motivation is what gets us up and going, but it’s habit that keeps us going. So it is with my tracking: though the motivation was to lose weight, the habit of tracking and keeping an eye on the numbers are what allowed me to go from daily small changes to a much bigger transformation from the overweight, depressed, and achy person I was 10 years ago to who I am now: someone interested in health and fitness and setting goals I can meet.

I learned that for me the act of tracking is the project itself. Although the data I generate can be charted and described in numerical relationships the number that brings me the information that makes a difference in my life, is a simple 1 – or tracking one day at a time.

I love to see the numbers my Garmin and Fitbit generate, but in the end, the quantified self for me is not so much about the measured life as it is about keeping those numbers coming through a well-lived and, more importantly, well-enjoyed life as I go from my fitter fifties into what I hope will be my sounder sixties.

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Bill Schuller on Counting with My Kids

Our show&tell talks usually give you insight into new and different self-tracking projects from a first person perspective. What we rarely hear about is how a self-tracking practice affects those around you, your family and friends. In this wonderful Ignite talk from our 2013 Global Conference Bill Schuller explains how his tracking has impacted his kids and what he’s learned from their experiences.

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Vivienne Ming on Tracking Her Son's Diabetes

Vivienne Ming is an accomplished neuroscientist and entrepreneur. When she’s not conducting research or working on new ideas she’s busy taking care of her son Felix. Two years ago Felix was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes. Vivienne and her partner tackled his diagnosis head on and started tracking everything they could. In this talk, presented at the 2013 Quantified Self Global Conference, Vivienne explains what they’re learning together.

We’ll be posting videos from our 2013 Global Conference during the next few months. If you’d like see talks like this in person we invite you to join us in Amsterdam for our 2014 Quantified Self Europe Conference on May 10 and 11th.

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Conference Preview: Bill Schuller on Self-Tracking with Children

QSSF13PREVIEW

How will children respond to a world where personal data is ubiquitous? Bill Schuller is starting to find out with his two young children and will be sharing his story at the upcoming 2013 Quantified Self Global Conference.

BillSchullerBill started tracking his exercise and weight in 2010. His preschool-aged son, listening to his father talk about his daily metrics at the dinner table, began to imitate Bill’s tracking behavior, regularly stepping on the scale, not to watch his weight, but to “just check my numbers.” Bill then designed tracking games for him and his son. One of them involved putting things away in the house while tracking steps and gaining “clean-up points.”

This fun talk will feature more stories on the creative ways Bill and his children are playing with self-tracking. As a preview, we have a version of the talk that he gave in San Diego in March 2012. Watch the video and then find out at the conference what further data adventures Bill has had with his kids in the last year and a half.

The Quantified Self Global Conference will be held in San Francisco on October 10th and 11th. Registration is now open. As with all of our conferences, our speakers are members of the community. We hope to see you there!

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