Tag Archives: Google Spreadsheets

How to Download Minute-by-Minute Fitbit Data

IntradayDataChart

Earlier this week we posted an update to our How To instructions for downloading your Fitbit data to Google Spreadsheets. This has been one of our most popular posts over the past few years. One of the most common requests we’ve received is to publish a guide to help people download and store their minute-by-minute level step and activity data. Today we’re happy to finally get that up.

The ability to access and download the minute-by-minute level (what Fitbit calls “intraday”) data requires one more step than what we’ve covered previously for downloading your daily aggregate data. Access to the intraday data is restricted to individuals and developers with access to the “Partner API.” In order to use the Partner API you must email the API team at Fitbit to request access and let them know what you intend to do with that data. Please note that they appear to encourage and welcome these type of requests. From their developer documentation:

Fitbit is very supportive of non-profit research and personal projects. Commercial applications require additional review and are subject to additional requirements. To request access, email api at fitbit.com.

In the video and instructions below I’ll walk you through setting up and using the Intraday Script to access and download your minute-by-minute Fitbit Data.

  1. Set up your FitBit Developer account and register an app.
    • Go to dev.fitbit.com and sign in using your FitBit credentials.
    • Click on the “Register an App” at the top right corner of the page.
    • Fill in your application information. You can call it whatever you want.
    • Make sure to click “Browser” for the Application Type and “Read Only” for the Default Access type fields.
    • Read the terms of service and if you agree check the box and click “Register.”
  2. Request Access to the Partner API
    • Email the API team at Fitbit
    • They should email you back within a day or two with  response
  3. Copy the API keys for the app you registered in Step 1
    • Go to dev.fitbit.com and sign in using your FitBit credentials.
    • Click on “Manage My Apps” at the top right corner of the page
    • Click on the app you created in Step 1
    • Copy the Consumer Key.
    • Copy the Consumer Secret.
    • You can save these to a text file, but they are also available anytime you return to dev.fitbit.com by clicking on the “Manage my Apps” tab.
  4. Set up your Google spreadsheet and script
    • Open your Google Drive
    • Create a new google spreadsheet.
    • Go to Tools->Script editor
    • Download this script, copy it’s contents, and paste into the script editor window. Make sure to delete all text in the editor before pasting. You can then follow along with the instructions below.
    • Select “renderConfigurationDialog” in the Run drop down menu. Click run (the right facing triangle).
    • Authorize the script to interact with your spreadsheet.
    • Navigate to the spreadsheet. You will see an open a dialog box in your spreadsheet.
    • In that dialog paste the Consumer Key and Consumer Secret that you copied from your application on dev.fitbit.com. Click “Save”
    • Navigate back to the scrip editor window.
    • Select “authorize” in the Run drop down menu. Click run (the right facing triangle).
    • Select “authorize” in the Run drop down menu. This will open a dialog box in your spreadsheet. Click yes.
    • A new browser window will open and ask you to authorize the application to look at your Fitbit data. Click allow to authorize the spreadsheet script.
  5. Download your Fitbit Data
    • Go back to your script editor window.
    • Edit the DateBegin and DateEnd variables with the date period you’d like to download. Remember, this script will only allow 3 to 4 days to be downloaded at a time. 
    • Select “refreshTimeSeries” in the Run drop down menu. Click run (the right facing triangle).
    • Your data should be populating the spreadsheet!

If you’re a developer or have scripting skills we welcome your help improving this intraday data script. Feel free to check out the repo on Github!

Posted in Lab Notes, Personal Projects | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

How To Download Fitbit Data Using Google Spreadsheets: An Update

Editors Note: We’ve updated this post to reflect Google’s move to a new version of their spreadsheet application. The newest version no longer support the Script Gallery mentioned here. We have included a link in the instruction steps below that allows you to use the old version of Google Spreadsheets. We’ll keep an eye out and update this post again if the old version is taken down. We’ve also included a new set of instructions if you’d like to use the new Google Spreadsheets. This involves slight editing to a simple script (updated 09/22/14). 

Interested in downloading your minute-by-minute Fitbit data? Check out our new how-to here! (updated 09/26/14)

We’ve updated the script to reflect Fitbit’s move to only accept HTTPS requests to access their API. Make sure to update your own scripts if you’ve modified the one linked below in Step 4 (updated 10/15/14). 

If you’re like me, then you’re always looking for new ways to learn about yourself through the data you collect. As a long time Fitbit user I’m always drawn back to my data in order to understand my own physical activity patterns. Last year we showed you how to access your Fitbit data in a Google spreadsheet. This was by far the easiest method for people who want to use the Fitbit API, but don’t have the programming skills to write their own code. As luck would have it one of our very own QS Meetup Organizers, Mark Leavitt from QS Portland, decided to make some modifications to that script to make it even easier to get your data. In this video below I walk you through the steps necessary to setup your very own Fitbit data Google spreadsheet.

Step-by-step instructions after the jump. Continue reading

Posted in QS Resource | Tagged , , , , | 156 Comments

FitBit + Google Spreadsheets = Awesome

This post and instructions are no longer up to date. For a current how-to please visit the updated post

On February 11th FitBit released their API into the wild and let developers get to work. Since then there have been some very neat integrations. One of the best uses of the API it the open source script that enables users to download their data into google spreadsheets. Developed by John McLaughlin, this script gives everyone the ability to get their historical data from FitBit and play with visualizations and analytics. Even someone without any programming experience can start creating very neat dynamic charts and graphs in under 30 minutes. For example I created the the following charts in just a few minutes (click images for interactive versions):

Daily Step Count:

If you already have a FitBit you might be wondering how to actually implement John’s script to grab your own data and start making fun charts and graphs. It takes about 15 minutes from start to finish to set up your FitBit developer account and then set up the script in Google Docs. The step-by-step process is outlined after the jump.

Continue reading

Posted in News and Pointers, Personal Projects | Tagged , , , , | 25 Comments