Tag Archives: healthkit

What We Are Reading

Enjoy this week’s list!

News

You’re invited to join us on June 20th for an amazing day of demos, talks, and sessions highlighting the very best of the Quantified Self at our QS15 Expo. Readers of What We’re Reading get a special discount. Just click here to get $10 off your ticket price.

We’ve received some amazing entries in our Future Normal QS15 Challenge, so amazing that we’ve extended the challenge a few days. If you’re reading this before Monday, June 1st make sure to enter nowfor your chance to win two free Ultimate Panels!

Articles

I’m the New CTO of HHS by Susannah Fox. So great to see this announcement. All of us at QS Labs have the utmost respect and admiration for Susannah and her dedication to positively impacting human health. Additional posts and articles about Susannah’s appointment can be found here and here.

As technology savvy as Susannah is, it is her capacity to hold a huge vision, and keeping patients at the center of that vision, that make her so deeply qualified for this job. No body asked me who the next CTO of the government was going to be, and frankly I was a little worried about who would be next. Bryan Sivak and Todd Park (her predecessors in this role) leave pretty damn big shoes to fill. Someone in the Whitehouse/HHS is casting a net wide enough to know who the really transformational thinkers in our industry are. – Fred Trotter

Special Report: Hacking the Human OS by IEEE Spectrum. A fantastic three-part report here by folks over at IEEE. This collection of articles, infographics, and op-eds is a must read.

Public Health and Tech: Long Lost Lovers? by Vanessa Mason. A short but nice article outlining how technology may interface with Public Health practices and program implementation. Great to see a mention our RWFJ supported Quantified Self Public Health Symposium.

The quantified self in a complex system: A systems perspective on mental workload by Steven Shorrock. A great post here by Steven concerning the role of quantitative information in dynamic and often complex human systems (like your workplace).

For these reasons, most numerical measures concerning human experience and system parameters should be treated as social objects. Any data on mental workload, sector capacity values, traffic numbers, or whatever, are a reason for a conversation, the start of a conversation – not an end point.

Show&Tell
milesCompBar
Apple Health App and My Quantified Self by Nadine Fischoff. One day Nadine realized her iPhone was keep track of her daily activity (steps and distance walked) so she decided to dive into the data to see what she could learn. With the help out our QS Access app (download it today – it’s free!) she was able to access, download, and analyze her data. What did she learn? Moving to New York City from Mountain View increased her daily walking 48%!

2014 Writing Progress by Ben Wilson. A great post here by Ben describing his writing progress over 2014. Ben tracked his goal of writing two novels in 2014, and ended up tracking over 90,000 words written.(Found via the always excellent Exist.io Blog.)

Visualizations
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Withings Health Observatory: Blood Pressure by Withings. Great to see Withings has added blood pressure to their real-time data dashboards.

Visualizing the Quantified Self: Giving Form to Lifelogging by Fil Greenwich. A nice overview post of different data visualizations.

From the Forum

GPX Import to Google Fit
Measuring Anxiety Using Smartphone Sensors
Is there a smartwatch app akin to Reporter or KeepTrack?

This Week on QuantifiedSelf.com

Welcome to Our QS15 Friends of QS

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QS Access: Backing up HealthKit Data

As you may know, we’re very interested in how HealthKit is shaping and extending the reach of personal self-tracking data. Last week, during Apple’s quarterly earnings call, Tim Cook mentioned that “There’s also been incredible interest in HealthKit, with over 600 developers now integrating it into their apps.” (emphasis mine).

This morning, we were alerted by Sam Rijver and Daniel Yates that special attention to how you backup up your phone is required in order to backup and have access to your HealthKit data:

 

For those of you that are unfamiliar with backup options for your iOS device. Here’s a quick gif to walk you through the process of encrypting your iOS backup so that you can restore your HealthKit data if anything happens to your device:


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QS Access App Visualization Showcase

Two weeks ago we announced the release of the QS Access App so you could access your HealthKit data in tabular format for personal exploration, visualization, and analysis. In that short period of time, we’ve seen a good number of downloads and positive feedback.



We know from our experiences hosting in-person and online communication about personal data that seeing real-world examples of what is possible is what inspires people to engage and ask questions of their own data. With that in mind we’re excited to announce our QS Access Visualization Showcase.

We are looking to you, our amazing community of trackers, designers, and visualizers, to show use what you can do with data gathered from using the QS Access App. Make heatmaps in D3, complete analyses and visualizations in Wizard, or just make meaningful charts in Excel. If you’re visualizing your QS Access data we want to see it.

We also know that data visualization design and creation is not trivial work. To support the community and help expose the visualization work we’ll be awarding free tickets to our QS15 Global Conference & Exposition to individuals who use QS Access to create unique and interesting visualizations. We’ve earmarked two tickets (a $700 value) for outstanding work.  If you’re selected, we’ll also work with you to showcase your work at the QS15 Conference and Exposition so other community members and attendees can explore and learn from their own data.

Submit your visualizations here.

 

If you’re in the Bay Area come to our QS Meetup on November 11th at the Berkeley Skydeck. You can showcase your visualization and tell our community what you’ve learned from accessing and visualizing your data.

Example Visualizations

HealthKit is still new and the number of apps that integrate with it is growing by the day. At QS Labs we’ve done a bit of work making simple visualizations that are meaningful to us.

Steps and Sedentary Activity

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Gary has an iPhone 5s which has native step tracking. We used the QS Access app to export his hourly step totals and made these simple line graphs in Excel. You can read more about what he learned from these simple data visualizations here.

How Much Do I Run?

Ernesto is an avid runner and enjoys running along the quiet trails in Los Angeles. He was interested to see how often he actually runs and if there’s any pattern to his running. Using a well-designed D3 template he was able to make a calendar heatmatp of his running distance.

 

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Example Data

If you don’t have any HealthKit data to work with, or just want to play with some example data we’ve created a few files that you can use as examples. Download the files below from our GitHub account and make sure to read the documentation to understand where the data is coming from.  Descriptions of the data files and sources are available in our QS Access Data Examples repo on Github.

Example Data:
ER_HealthKit_DailyData
ER_HealthKit_HourlyData

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QS Access App: See your HealthKit Data in a Table

On Wednesday this week we learned that the QS Access app we submitted to the Apple store was approved. This means you can download the QS Access app on iTunes. We hope you’ll find it useful. Our app is a very simple tool for accessing HealthKit data in a table so that you can explore it using Numbers, Excel, R, or any other CSV compatible tool.

It is still early days for HealthKit, but my conversations with toolmakers at Quantified Self events convinces me that there will be many device and software makers that integrate with Apple’s platform for collecting and analyzing personal data. I hope this will allow more people to learn from their own data by reflecting on changes over time and by combining multiple data streams – such as activity, sleep, and nutrition – into a single visualization for comparison.

To give you your HealthKit data in tabular format, we’ve had to simplify it. QS Access shows your data in either “hourly” or “daily” chunks.  These won’t be appropriate for all uses, but many interesting questions can be asked of data that is presented as a time series using hourly and daily values. This is just a starting point, and we’re looking forward to making it do more based on your feedback.

We very much hope that if you learn something from your data using QS Access, you’ll share your project by participating in a Quantified Self Show&Tell meetup and by joining us at QS15 Conference and Exposition next year in San Francisco. Suggestions about the app itself and interesting examples of usage can be shared with us directly by emailing us: labs@quantifiedself.com,

Read a short example of using QS Access to look at my activity data.
Find Support for QS Access in the QS Forum.

The QS Access App was authored by our long time QS Labs friend and collaborator Robin Barooah.

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Gary Wolf: Even when I'm active, I'm sedentary


Gary21634

We recently released our QS Access app, which allows you to see HealthKit data in tabular format. Not very many tools feed data into HealthKit yet, but Apple’s platform does pick up step data gathered by the iPhone itself. I have step data on HealthKit going back about two weeks. When Ernesto Ramirez and I were playing around with QS Access, loading the data into Excel and looking at some simple charts, I learned something: Even when I’m active, I’m sedentary.

Gary3334

My daily step totals ranged from a depressing 3334 steps on Thursday, September 18 to an inspiring 21,634 steps on Friday, September 25, but – as these charts clearly show – even  on the extreme days my activity was concentrated into relatively short periods when I got up from my desk and went out to do something. Most hours, every day, were spent with hardly any movement at all. I’m sitting at my desk, and sitting at my desk some more, and sitting at my desk still more. That’s probably not good. No, not good at all.

Pulling my data out of HealthKit and seeing a few simple charts gave me a bit of insight that I hope will lead to a change in how much I sit. It was a great to be able to easily make some simple analysis of my data. I hope you’ll find QS Access useful also (you can learn more about it here). Please share what you learn in the QS Access thread in the QS Forum or by emailing us about your projects: qsaccess@quantifiedself.com.

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What We Are Reading

We hope you enjoy this weeks list. Feel free to submit articles, show&tell self-tracking stories, and QS data visualizations. Just email me!

Articles
Why can’t you track periods in Apple’s Health app? by Nat Buckley. With the recent re-release of Apple’s HealthKit enabled self-tracking and personal data system it no wonder that people are taking a long hard look at what data is being excluded. With the popularity of menstruation tracking apps (this app has nearly 30,000 ratings) it’s surprising this was overlooked. This excellent post is a must read on the topic.

Now That Cars Have Black Boxes, Am I Being Tracked? by Popular Science Editors. Questions and concerns about surveillance are becoming more commonplace. As someone who is looking to purchase a car in the next year or so I was happy to see this post come across my stream.

The Quantified Self community, lifelogging and the making of “smart” publics by Aristea Fotopoulou. I love it when people take a thoughtful look at the Quantified Self community and write about their experiences:

For me, the potential of QS for public participation lies in the show and tell meet-ups that constitute a central feature of this community. Meet-ups enable the exchange of stories about the success or failure of lifelogging practices; they allow people to connect and form synergies around common interests, and to explore wider questions such as personal data management and ownership. [...] members touch upon key political issues and create temporary spaces of dialogue: what happens to personal data, who has access to these data (is it private individuals, governments or corporations)? For what purposes (medical research)? And how can these data be interpreted (by algorithms, visualisations) and used to tell stories about people?

Stepping Down: Rethinking the Fitness Tracker by Sara M. Watson. Sara uses her personal journey of recovery from hip surgery to frame an interesting question: Should we trust our fitness trackers to prescribe movement goals?

Show&Tell
Practical Statistical Modeling: The Dreaded After-School Carpool Pickup by Jamie Todd Rubin. Jamie wanted to understand if there was a way he could reduce how much time he spent waiting in line to pick up his son from school. Why not track it and model it!

Bulletproof Diet and Intermittent Fasting: 1.5 Year Results by Bob Troia. Bob takes a deep dive into his data to see if this particular diet is having beneficial health effects. Click for the great data, stay for the wonderful discussion and very, very thorough write-up.

Visualizations


Quotidian Record by Brian House. I’ve been a fan of Brian House since his early days visualizing Fitbit data. I was reminded of this work during a conversation about geolocation data and thought it would be a nice addition to our visualization list.

KMcCurdy_SMVisualizing My Daily Self-Management by Katie McCurdy.

What does my daily medication and self-management look like? How could I visualize this regimen? How can I communicate the ‘burden’ and work of caring for myself?

I decided to draw pictures of the things that I need to do on a daily basis; that way I could show the workshop attendees what my day was like instead of just telling them.

JawboneTimetoEatIt’s Time to Eat by Karl Krehbiel. Karl, a data science intern at Jawbone used the data from their global community of users the determine the likelihood of food and drink consumption during the day. Really fun and interesting visualizations here.

From the Forum
Seeking opinions of diabetic self-trackers for non-profit project
Five Years of Weight Tracking
What Disclaimer should I use when making my personal #quantifiedself data public?

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What We Are Reading

Enjoy this week’s list!

Articles
Effect of Self-monitoring and Medication Self-titration on Systolic Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Patients at High Risk of Cardiovascular Disease by Richard McManus et al. An interesting research paper here about using self-monitoring to reduce blood pressure. The paper is behind a paywall, but since you’re nice we’ve put a copy here.

Apple Prohibits HealthKit App Developers From Selling Health Data by Mark Sullivan. Some interesting news here from Apple in advance of their new phone and possible device release in a few weeks. I applaud the move, but would like to see more information about data portability in the next release.

Science Advisor, Larry Smarr by 23andMe. Great to hear our friends 23andMe and Larry Smarr are getting together to help work on understanding Inflammatory Bowel Disease. If you’ve been diagnosed with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis consider joining the study.

Personal Health Data: It’s Amazing Potential and Privacy Perils by Beth Kanter. A lot of people have been talking recently about the privacy implications of using different tracking tools and technologies. In this short post Beth opens up some interesting questions about why we might or might not open up our personal data to others. Make sure to read through for some insightful comments as well.

Show&Tell
Let’s Talk About 3 Months of Self-Quantifying by Frank Rousseau. Frank is one of the founders of Cozy Cloud, a personal could service. He’s also designed Kyou a custom tracker system built on top of Cozy. He’s also been using the services to track his life. In this post he explain how tracking his activity, sleep, weight, and other habits led to some interesting insights about his behavior.

The iPhone 5S’ M7 Predictor as a Predictor of Fitbit Steps by Zach Jones. A great post here by Zach as he explores the data taken from his iPhone 5S vs. his Fitbit.

Using Open Data to Predict When You Might Get Your Next Parking Ticket by Ben Wellington. Not strictly a personal data show&tell here, but as someone who suffers from street sweeping parking tickets somewhat frequently I found this post fascinating. Now to see if Los Angeles has open data…

Visualizations
RWTime
What Time of Day Do People Run? by Robert James Reese, Dan Fuehrer, and Christine Fennessay. Runners World and Runkeeper partnered to understand the running habits of runners around the world. Some interesting insights here!

FitbitMin
What Happens When You Graduate and Get a Real Job by Reddit user matei1987. A really neat visualization of min-by-min level Fitbit step data.

DataDesign
Data + Design by Infoactive and the Donald W. Reynolds Institute. A really interesting and unique take on a data visualization book. This CC-licensed, open source, and collaborative project represents the work of many volunteers. I’ve only read through a few chapters, but it seems to be a wonderful resource for anyone working in data visualization.

From the Forum
Good Morning World!
Quantified Chess
New Activity Tracker to Replace BodyMedia?
Indirect Mood Measures
OPI TrueSense for Sleep Tracking

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