Tag Archives: how-to

Track HRV, Make a Dashboard, and Have Fun with Fitbit at QSEU15

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We just published a preview of our program for the upcoming 2015 Quantified Self Europe Conference. This year we’re experimenting with some new “how-to” sessions to help everybody learn something new and apply right away in their self-tracking practice.

We’re thrilled to have ten how-to  sessions on the program. From spaced repetition, to heart rate variability, and tracking sneezing (really!), these sessions also give you a chance to learn directly from some of the most pioneering and experienced participants in the global Quantified Self community. You can see the full schedule in our just-posted preliminary program.

Tickets are almost sold out, so if you want to come this is the last week to register!

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How To Access & Export MyFitnessPal Data

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MyFitnessPal is one of the leading dietary tracking tools, currently used by tens of millions of people all around the world to better track and understand the foods they consume every day. Their mobile apps and online tools allow individuals to enter foods and keep track of their micro- and macro-nutrient consumption, connect additional devices such as fitness trackers, and connect with their community – all in the name of weight management. However, there is no natively available method for easily accessing your dietary data for personal analysis, visualization, or storage.

With a bit of digging in the MyFitnessPal help section we can see that they have no official support for data export. However, they mention the ability to print reports and save PDF files that contain your historical data. While better than some services, a PDF document is far from easy to use when you’re trying to make your own charts or take a deeper look into your data.

We spent some time combing the web for examples of MyFitnessPal data export solutions over the last few days. We hope that some of these are useful to you in your ongoing self-tracking experiences.

Browser Extensions/Bookmarks

MyFitnessPal Data Downloader: This extension allows you to directly download a CSV report from your Food Report page. (Chrome only)

MyFitnessPal Data Export: This extension is tied to another website, FoodFastFit.com. If you install the extension, it will redirect you back to that site where your data is displayed and you can download the CSV file. (Chrome only)

ExportMFP: A simple bookmark that will open a text area with comma-separated values for weight and calories, which you can copy/paste into your data editor of choice.

MyFitnessPal Reports: A bookmarklet that allows you to generates more detailed graphs and reports.

 Web Apps/Tools

MyFitnessPal Analyser: Accesses your diet and weight data. It requires you to input your password so be careful.

Export MyFitnessPal Data to CSV: Simple web tool for exporting your data.

FreeMyDiary: A recently developed tool for exporting your food diary data.

Technical Solutions

MyFitnessPal Data Access via Python: If you’re comfortable working with the Python language, this might be for you. Developed by Adam Coddington, it allows access to your MyFitnessPal data programmatically

MFP Extractor and Trend Watcher: An Excel Macro, developed by a MyFitnessPal user, that exports your dietary and weight data into Excel. This will only work for Windows users.

Access MyFitnessPal Data in R: If you’re familiar with R, then this might work for you.

QS Access + Apple HealthKit

If you’re an iPhone user, you can connect MyFitnessPal to Apple’s HealthKit app to view your MyFitnessPal data alongside other data you’re collecting. You can also easily export the data from your Health app using our QS Access app. Data is available in hourly and daily breakdowns, and you should be able to export any data type MyFitnessPal is collecting to HealthKit.

As always, we’re interested to hear your stories and learn about your experiences with exploring your data. Feel free to leave comments here or get in touch via twitter or email.

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How to Download Minute-by-Minute Fitbit Data

NOTE: The methods detailed in this post no longer work. The post is kept here for archival purposes, but unfortunately you will not be able to access your Fitbit data by following the steps.

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Earlier this week we posted an update to our How To instructions for downloading your Fitbit data to Google Spreadsheets. This has been one of our most popular posts over the past few years. One of the most common requests we’ve received is to publish a guide to help people download and store their minute-by-minute level step and activity data. Today we’re happy to finally get that up.

The ability to access and download the minute-by-minute level (what Fitbit calls “intraday”) data requires one more step than what we’ve covered previously for downloading your daily aggregate data. Access to the intraday data is restricted to individuals and developers with access to the “Partner API.” In order to use the Partner API you must email the API team at Fitbit to request access and let them know what you intend to do with that data. Please note that they appear to encourage and welcome these type of requests. From their developer documentation:

Fitbit is very supportive of non-profit research and personal projects. Commercial applications require additional review and are subject to additional requirements. To request access, email api at fitbit.com.

In the video and instructions below I’ll walk you through setting up and using the Intraday Script to access and download your minute-by-minute Fitbit Data.

  1. Set up your FitBit Developer account and register an app.
    • Go to dev.fitbit.com and sign in using your FitBit credentials.
    • Click on the “Register an App” at the top right corner of the page.
    • Fill in your application information. You can call it whatever you want.
    • Make sure to click “Browser” for the Application Type and “Read Only” for the Default Access type fields.
    • Read the terms of service and if you agree check the box and click “Register.”
  2. Request Access to the Partner API
    • Email the API team at Fitbit
    • They should email you back within a day or two with  response
  3. Copy the API keys for the app you registered in Step 1
    • Go to dev.fitbit.com and sign in using your FitBit credentials.
    • Click on “Manage My Apps” at the top right corner of the page
    • Click on the app you created in Step 1
    • Copy the Consumer Key.
    • Copy the Consumer Secret.
    • You can save these to a text file, but they are also available anytime you return to dev.fitbit.com by clicking on the “Manage my Apps” tab.
  4. Set up your Google spreadsheet and script
    • Open your Google Drive
    • Create a new google spreadsheet.
    • Go to Tools->Script editor
    • Download this script, copy it’s contents, and paste into the script editor window. Make sure to delete all text in the editor before pasting. You can then follow along with the instructions below.
    • Select “renderConfigurationDialog” in the Run drop down menu. Click run (the right facing triangle).
    • Authorize the script to interact with your spreadsheet.
    • Navigate to the spreadsheet. You will see an open a dialog box in your spreadsheet.
    • In that dialog paste the Consumer Key and Consumer Secret that you copied from your application on dev.fitbit.com. Click “Save”
    • Navigate back to the scrip editor window.
    • Select “authorize” in the Run drop down menu. Click run (the right facing triangle).
    • Select “authorize” in the Run drop down menu. This will open a dialog box in your spreadsheet. Click yes.
    • A new browser window will open and ask you to authorize the application to look at your Fitbit data. Click allow to authorize the spreadsheet script.
  5. Download your Fitbit Data
    • Go back to your script editor window.
    • Edit the DateBegin and DateEnd variables with the date period you’d like to download. Remember, this script will only allow 3 to 4 days to be downloaded at a time. 
    • Select “refreshTimeSeries” in the Run drop down menu. Click run (the right facing triangle).
    • Your data should be populating the spreadsheet!

If you’re a developer or have scripting skills we welcome your help improving this intraday data script. Feel free to check out the repo on Github!

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