Tag Archives: meditation

What We Are Reading

Welcome to our 24th edition of What We Are Reading. Enjoy these links, articles, and ideas from around the web.

Getting started with data visualization after getting started with data visualization by Nathan Yau: The man behind the wonderful Flowing Data blog put together a simple primer for those of you interested in data visualization. Make sure to check out all the great examples.

Journal of Personal Science: Effect of Meditation on Math Speed by Peter Lewis: Originally presented at our 2013 Quantified Self European Conference, this post details Peter’s self-experiment on improving his cognitive abilities through a meditation practice.
Peter also has an excellent post on his personal website entitled, What’s Driving the Quantified Self Movement? Well worth a read.

Quantbaby: The Birth of a Datababe by Whitney Erin Boesel: Sociologist and friend of Quantified Self tackles a tough question, “Are children an extension of self when we start tracking them?” There was lot of news recently around baby tracking these days This post takes a thoughtful look at the role of identity and tracking in child rearing.

The Quantified Lives of Others by Jamie McHale: When we track ourselves are we tracking other’s by proxy?

Russell Poldrack Studying His Own Brain by Daniel Oppenheimer: A neuroscientist and imaging expert, Russell Poldrack is in the midst of a super interesting self-tracking journey. Over the course of a year he’s tracking multiple facets of himself, including his brain.

“There’s a way in which it’s a very old-fashioned project,” says Poldrack. “There’s a long history of scientists doing experiments, sometimes crazy experiments, on themselves. It doesn’t happen much anymore, but in this case I couldn’t expect a volunteer to give up this much of their time. However, I’m obsessive enough that I thought I could actually pull it off, and I have the resources to do it.”

What You’re Reading

Tell me EVERYTHING About you: What’s Next in Quantified Self?> | 740 tweets

Stealth Fitness Startup Human Wants to Make Quantified Self Mainstream | 129 tweets

From Scientology to the quantified self: the strange tech behind a new wave of self-trackers | 93 tweets

How the Quantified-Self Will Make Big Data a Normal Part of Life | 41 tweets

The Body Data Craze – Newsweek and The Daily Beast | 40 tweets

Smart Fashion for the Self-Quantified : New Wave of Wearable Tech | 26 tweets

A Digital Diaper for Tracking Children’s Health – NYTimes.com | 26 tweets

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Gary Wolf: Meditation Q&A

At a recent QS meetup in Boston, Gary shares a few quick insights on the challenges of restarting a tracking practice once you’ve stopped, gamification vs. motivation, and his experience of meditation. Check out the video below, as well as a more detailed discussion about his meditation practice.

Gary Wolf – Boston QS Q&A – October 19, 2011 from Gary Wolf on Vimeo.

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Catherine Kerr on Cortical Measures in Mindfulness Meditation

Catherine Kerr does brain science related to mindfulness at Brown University Medical School. She points out that mindfulness traditions ask practitioners to simply focus closely on body sensations in order to bring attention to the present moment. Why does this help with depression? In the video below, Catherine explains some of her magnetoencephalopathy (MEG) research to answer this question, and suggests that detecting cortical changes may be one of the earliest, instinctive QS-related forms of self-awareness. (Filmed by the Boston QS Show&Tell meetup group.)

Catherine Kerr – Cortical Measures Related to Attending to the Body in Mindfulness Meditation from Gary Wolf on Vimeo.

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Alan Bachers on Optimal Neurology

Alan Bachers is an expert in neurofeedback training, which he comfortingly describes as helping the brain learn how to calibrate itself. He suggests that this training accelerates the process of getting into meditative or other desirable mental states, and can possibly help a medicated brain learn to function without medication. In the video below, he does a fascinating live demonstration of the NeurOptimal system on an audience member, with on-screen visualizations of the volunteer’s brain activity. I’d love to see how my brain looks with this tool! (Filmed by the Boston QS Show&Tell meetup group.)

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Gary Wolf on MetaQS and Meditation

QS founder Gary Wolf speaks at the Silicon Valley QS meetup group, giving a meta look at what Quantified Self is about, followed by a personal show&tell about his meditation data.

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Toolmaker Talk: Robin Barooah (Equanimity)

This is the first post in a new series of “Toolmaker Talks” we’re starting on the Quantified Self blog. There are many conducting personal QS projects, and much of what is featured on the QS blog is about: what did they do? how did they do it? and what have they learned?  Now, we want to also hear from those closely observing all this QS activity and developing appropriate tools: what needs have they observed? what tools have they developed in response? and what have they learned from users’ experiences?

Equanimity, an iPhone app, is a beautiful timer and journal for meditation. Its functionality (timers, logs, charts) and design support your meditation practice in an appropriately non-intrusive way. As one reviewer noted: “Meditating is all about letting go of your frustrations and achieving peace of mind. … [Equanimity] is easy to use and everything about it is focused on offering you a calm experience.”

Developer Robin Barooah explains what led to its creation and the impact it has had.

Q: How do you describe Equanimity? What is it?
Barooah: In the most basic sense, Equanimity is an iPhone app that I designed to help me meditate regularly.  It does this in two ways. First, by providing a timer that’s easy to use and not distracting.  That helps with the meditation sessions themselves because it provides a well-defined end time so I don’t have to worry about going on for too long and disturbing my daily routine.

Secondly, and to me more importantly, Equanimity keeps a log of the meditations it has timed, and provides clear graphical feedback on how frequently I meditate, and how long and how consistently I’ve maintained my practice for.  It also provides a gentle reminder in the form of an indicator that shows whether I’ve meditated yet that day.  The idea behind these features is that they provide an honest reflection of my meditation practice, and that this reflection influences my behavior.

Before I used Equanimity, I found that I would meet resistance in my practice and have an inaccurate perception of how much I was meditating.  I found it easy to think I was meditating every other day, though actually only doing it twice a week, if I didn’t keep a record.  I’ve found it’s even possible to forget during the day whether I’d done it or not.  Since I do actually want to meditate each day, this kind of gentle feedback is enough to help me keep on track in a way I found very hard before.  It’s basically an antidote to self-deceptive or inaccurate thoughts.

Q: What’s the back story? What led to it?
Barooah: I had gone through a particularly stressful couple of years and even though the stress was over, I found that I was experiencing anxiety and lowered concentration. Meditation is associated with spiritual benefits and self-knowledge too, but at the beginning of the project I was just looking to recover.  I had previously meditated in various classes and knew that meditation could help me, but I hadn’t managed to establish a practice outside of a class.  I knew that I wasn’t the only person who had trouble making meditation part of their routine, so I thought that if I could solve the problem for myself, my solution would be useful for others too.

I’d experimented with keeping track on paper and using a coffee timer in the past, without success.  That would often break down because I wouldn’t have the paper and timer with me when I thought of meditating.  I experimented with building a web application, but it became clear that an iPhone app had the potential to be much more personal, and was more likely to be with me when I needed it.  Also, having a computer sitting in the background didn’t feel right.

Q: What impact has it had?
Barooah: I think I can now say that I meditate every day.  It took much longer for me to get to that point than I anticipated, though — something like 18 months.  Over that time, by looking at my meditation history I was able to learn about things that disrupted my practice and make adjustments.  Doing meditation early in my day is much more reliable than later, for example.  More interestingly, I could see from the annual chart that things like traveling, illness, and minor depressions all had the potential to significantly disrupt my practice.  They still do have an effect but now typically only for a day at most, because I understand what’s happening and can adapt my routine accordingly.

I think it’s also helped me grow significantly in patience with myself, by revealing what I would probably have thought of as a series of independent failures to be a slow learning process leading to success.

As far as other people go, it’s a little harder to say. I don’t collect user data because I think that would interfere with the sense of meditation being a private experience.  There are thousands of users, though, and I have heard from many people who also say that it’s helped with their practice. There are also regular meditators who had no trouble practicing regularly before, but use Equanimity because they just like the design.

At some point I would like to ask people to sign up for a study so I can learn more about the range of experiences, but I never feel good about  software that persuades people to give up personal information, so that will be a separate project that people can volunteer for.

Q: What makes it different, sets it apart?
There are a few other well-produced meditation apps available for the iPhone.  Each has a different focus.  I think Equanimity is unique in being directly focused on solving the problem of cultivating a daily practice.

I use it myself every day, so I’ve removed all the friction I can from the daily meditation process.  The feedback charts are carefully designed to provide information that is useful at different stages in the process of developing a practice without needing any work.  For most people it’s self-explanatory and doesn’t need any setting up.  The more advanced features only come into view when you need them.  As I learn more, I’m steadily developing the app while maintaining its simplicity.

Q: Anything else you’d like to say?

Thanks for asking me about this project!  It’s nice to have a chance to reflect on it.  I think that now that we have truly personal computing devices we are starting to learn how to use them to learn more about ourselves as human beings.  To me, this presents genuinely new and optimistic possibilities for improving our lives.  I’m looking forward to learning more about the stories behind other projects as you continue this series.

Product: Equanimity
Website: http://meditate.mx/iphone
Platform: iPhone
Price: $4.99

(If you are a “toolmaker” and want to participate in this series, contact rajivzume@gmail.com)

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David Charron on Attention Tracking

Do you have the energy to do everything but the focus to accomplish nothing? David Charron of UC Berkeley studies multi-tasking, distraction and sustainable attention. He has experimented with quantifying his own attention, and compared himself to a long-time meditator. Check out his results and the interesting audience questions in the video below. (Filmed at the Bay Area QS Show&Tell meetup on 3/24/11 at TechShop.)

David Charron – Attention from Gary Wolf on Vimeo.

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George Lawton on Cultivating Happiness

George Lawton studies happiness, and how to have more of it. In the video below, he talks about emotional feedback tools, his research on how to incrementally increase happiness, and how he tried to change his mood by changing his facial expressions. George also discusses mirror meditation as a way to increase emotional well-being, engages the audience with healthy laughter, and mentions his next project, on love. (Filmed at the Bay Area Quantified Self meetup held at Adaptive Path).

George Lawton – Cultivating Happiness from Gary Wolf on Vimeo.

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Roundup: Lifestyle Tracking Tools

I’m starting to wonder – is there any aspect of life that cannot be tracked? This week’s roundup on lifestyle-tracking tools moves into deeply personal areas like sex life, baby’s sleep schedule, amount of drinking, menstrual cycles, meditation, and media consumption. Proceed with caution if you are squeamish.

It’s part of our regular tool roundup for the complete catalog we’re putting together of all the self-tracking tools out there. Please help us to make sure we include your favorite tool, your company, or your project. Self-promotion is allowed!

Here are all the lifestyle-related tracking tools we’ve found so far. Please let me know what we’re missing in the comments below, and please check our bigger list as well to check if your suggestion is already there.

Continue reading

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A Futurist’s Take on Self-Tracking and Mindfulness

I’ve been thinking for some time about the connection between self-tracking and mindfulness. At first glance they seem to be very different – picture the wired-up gadget wizard sitting next to the unadorned meditating guru. But step to the side and look from a different angle, and you may see meditation and self-tracking as two parallel tools that lead down the same path toward mindfulness.

While these thoughts were swirling through my mind, I got an email from Alex Pang. Alex is a futurist currently housed at Microsoft Research Cambridge, where he is studying the relationship between self-tracking/self-experimentation and mindfulness in a project he calls “contemplative computing”. Wow. Alex just finished writing an article on this topic, using his own experience with weight loss as an example, and delving both into the past and into the future to come to some interesting conclusions. His paper is available here, and I’d love to know if anyone else out there has been thinking about this connection as well.

Maybe the modern-day version of the gong and the meditation cushion are the self-tracking app and the device that runs it?

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