Tag Archives: qs17

Thomas Blomseth Christiansen: Over-Instrumented Running

Some More Instrumentation Thomas Blomseth Christiansen

 

“When in doubt, add more instrumentation.”

Have you ever felt that some parts of your life should remain unquantified? Perceived quality of your poetry, or perhaps duration of arguments with your significant other? Until recently, I kept running in my ‘not to be quantified’ bucket. It was such a meditative alone time that I didn’t want to risk disturbing it through observation. I tracked the kilometers I ran and nothing more.  That changed at the finish line of a recent 50k, where I learned that my wearable had overestimated the race distance by over 8 k! I was pretty miffed, and I turned to this talk for inspiration.

Thomas inhabits the far end of the quantified running spectrum. His talk from QS17 is a fun watch, and the project page is here.

What did he do? He started out  disappointed by hitting the wall midway through a marathon. This is common enough, but Thomas’ response to running a painfully positive split was to code his own negative split plan generator, rubber band split-plan sticky notes to his arm, and set out to run at a concrete pace. His project evolved to include an olympic swimming coach, many new devices, a metronome – and ultimately mastery of the art of pacing.

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Jakob Eg Larsen: Tracking Sleep and Resting Heart Rate

JakobLarsenRHRdata

Jakob Eg Larsen has tracked his sleep and resting heart rate (RHR) for the past four years. His 7 minute talk is far better watched than read about: it’s a great illustration of data validation, longitudinal tracking, and data assisted self-awareness.

Briefly, by tracking his RHR over a long period of time, Jakob has developed an intuition for connections between his RHR and physiological state. He’s able to use the data to tune his self-awareness, but still keep a safety net when unexpected RHR elevations might portend a flu. To boot, the years of data across the Fitbit Blaze, Oura ring and Basis are one of the most extensive within-individual comparisons I can find anywhere of these devices.

You can watch the full video of Jakob’s talk at his QS Project page.

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Cantor Soule-Reeves: Fight For Your Right to Recess

Cantor

It rains a lot in Portland, Oregon. And if you’re 8 years old like Cantor, recess gets cancelled a lot. But unlike most 8-year-olds, Cantor is doing something about that.

By tracking his steps, he’s able to show that every cancelled recess takes about 600 steps out of his day. Compared to his average of ~15,000 steps a day, it might not sound like a lot, but Cantor and his mom Bethany hope it might be enough to change his elementary school’s policy for rainy-day restrictions.

We don’t typically see young children doing serious self-tracking, especially with such an altruistic (and downright cool) aim of fighting for more recess time. We have our fingers crossed, both for the school’s response and for seeing more projects like Cantor’s in the future. Check out Cantor’s talk at QS Project page.

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QS17 Highlight: Body Temperature and Ovulatory Cycles

Azure TalkI was thrilled to have the chance to do a Show&Tell talk about tracking my ovulatory cycle via minute-by-minute body temperature during the final plenary session at QS17 Conference. It’s an ongoing project that explores what high-temporal-resolution body temperature can help us learn about our reproductive state. Daily body temperature readings are already used to aid fertility tracking, but several of you expressed interest in collecting more frequent data with me. You inspired me to start uploading my cycle tracking code on Github. I’ll be adding to this repository over time, so check back and shoot me a message if you have an idea you’d like me to try!

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QS17 Amsterdam Highlight: Tracking Crying

Robin_Weis_CrymotionWe’re back from QS17 and eager to share the conference with you from beginning to end. This, our ninth conference, covered a lot of ground: we showcased self-tracking projects, investigated our relationship with technology, and discussed the past and future of QS. Over the coming weeks, we’ll share some conference highlights.

Today I want to share our opening Show & Tell from Robin Weis, which captures the personal discovery and data-driven spirit of QS. If you’re new to QS, you might not know that the community is about much more than tracking your steps or your hours of sleep: it’s about gaining personal insight by putting numbers to any important aspect of your life. Robin Weis tracked an unusual metric – crying – over a long period of time and did an inspiring job tying together her personal story with her data. Click the link above, check it out, and come back in a few days for another talk!

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QS17 Program Updates

QS17 is here!

We can’t wait to see old friends and meet new people who have never been to a QS conference before. If you are reading this because you are attending QS17, you are in for something special. Our program is filled with engaging talks, fascinating discussions, and informative workshops. Here is a PDF of the printed program.

Here is a map of the venue to help you find your breakout discussion and workshop rooms:
Casa400map

Updates to the QS17 program

Our sessions come from our attendees and we try to leave the program open for as long as we can before we send it to the printer. Still, some things come in after the deadline and we can’t resist finding a spot for them. Below are new sessions that will be happening in addition to the printed program:

Saturday

Lunch (13:00-14:00)
Office Hours
GERO
Stanislav Leontenko, Nikolai Kovtunenko
Gero has developed a first digital biomarker of aging which can be measured by your physical activity gathered from your smartphone or wearable device. By using this tool, you can evaluate your personalized effect of healthy or unhealthy lifestyle. 
getgero.com

BLOODTESTERS
Azure Grant
Get your blood cholesterol tested! Lets’ talk about the value of this metric and what could be learned by having the ability to get a lipid profile in your home.

Session 3 (14:00-15:00)
Breakout Session
QS IN THE JUDICIAL CONTEXT (Harvard)
Liza Cornet
In what way could QS help with the understanding, prevention and intervention of offending behavior.

Sunday

Session 5 (10:30-11:30)
Show&Tell
DIABETES VIZ
Peter Kok
In this talk, I will show a custom web app that I’ve created that automatically collects data from continuous glucose monitor and with some novel visualizations, helps me manage my diabetes.

Lunch (13:00-14:00)
Office Hours
ACTITHINGS
Elke Beck
I’m a human-computer interaction researcher and I’m currently exploring how sensor-based self-tracking technologies can help older adults (65+ years) to reflect on their physical activity/ sedentary habits in daily life. I’ve developed several low-tech,  interactive prototypes which people can use for tracking and reflecting their physical activity behaviour.

BLOOD VALUE RESPONSES TO FOOD, FASTING, AND EXERCISE
Ben Best
I have been monitoring the way my blood glucose, ketone, and triglyceride respond to various foods by making hourly measurements 6 to 10 hours after eating the food. I practice a ketogenic diet, and often fast. Every few months I get very detailed laboratory blood tests.

BLOODTESTERS
Azure Grant
Get your blood cholesterol tested! Lets’ talk about the value of this metric and what could be learned by having the ability to get a lipid profile in your home.

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QS17 Preview: Externalizing Health Rewards

HausPlantKyrill

Kyrill Potapov: “I’ve been hacking Rescue Time, which tracks how I use my computer, to make it a tool for personal growth rather than work optimization.”

Feeling unpleasantly like he was “moving from one pressing issue to the next like a pinball”, Kyrill decided that he needed a way to track not just productivity, but satisfaction and growth. The standard approach would be to simply divide and assess how he spent his time: (some tasks are productive and satisfying; others are productive but menial). Instead, he decided to appeal to his altruism and devise a clever system to incentivize productive and satisfying behavior.

At QS17, Kyrill’s talk will explain how he uses the productivity output of Rescue Time to turn on a light bulb which is the primary energy source for “Pip”, his houseplant. This isn’t just cute – tying the health of another to one’s own behavior can be an extremely motivating force. My mom has told me that her pregnancy flipped a switch for her self-care, making her more aware of her own health behaviors and more able to adjust them. Obviously, having a baby isn’t a feasible strategy for inspiring behavioral change in general, but tying the life of a living *plant* to your behavior is a similar, (albeit low stakes) motivator. A healthy sense of pun-humor let’s Kyrill see his ‘personal growth’ and consistency over time.

Speaking of time for self care and growth, I’m about to take off backpacking for a few weeks. See you in Amsterdam!

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QS17 Preview: Mental & Metabolic Dashboard

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Dr. Tara Thiagarajan: “I’ve created a dashboard to illustrate the inter-relatedness of my mental and metabolic machinery .”

While the terms ”dashboard” and ”machinery” may bring to mind the tidy and separable systems operating within a car, it’s the crossed wires of human neurophysiology that will be the subject of this conference preview. Though western medicine tends to treat physiological systems (cognition, digestion, hormonal axes) as disparate, centuries of wisdom and mounting scientific data suggest a great depth of inter-relatedness across physiological systems. Ancient thinkers like Plutarch, Ptolemy and Boethius have gone as far as to describe the interactions between human systems as musical chords – harmonious when healthy, dissonant when ill:

“Whoever penetrates into his own self perceives human music. For what unites the incorporeal nature of reason with the body if not a certain harmony and, as it were, a careful tuning of low and high pitches as though producing one consonance” – Boethius, Fundamentals of Music

At QS17, only a few weeks away, Tara will bring her background in math and neuroscience to show us how she has captured her ‘human music‘ by looking at interactions between her sleep, diet, water intake, and brain activity. Tara is the founder of Sapien Labs, which seeks to use EEG technology in a broad and more accessible context to generate massive data sets of human brain activity. She’s one of many excellent speakers presenting novel connections in personal data – check out our other participants and join us there!

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QS17 Preview: Counting Scars

image (1)Ellis Bartholomeus: “I’ll share my quantified body as tracked by my physical scars.”

Ellis has a dream job: she is a ‘game alchemist’ who studies the value of play. With Quantified Self, Ellis has drawn a face a day and shared photos to track her mood and food. At the 2017 Quantified Self Global Conference, she’ll share her quantification of one of the inevitable and unpredictable outcomes of play: scars. She has recorded her date of injury, scar size, healing time and other metrics. While most ‘quantified scar’ studies and articles on the web focus on how to get rid of scars as effectively as possible, this talk will focus more on the narrative scars tell us about our bodies and our activities- from fun childhood games to recovery from car accidents. We’re looking forward to hearing Ellis’ wisdom on how we can “In the context of our scars… learn to deal with life more playfully and appreciate it more.”

All of our conference speakers are members of the community. Check out our program to get a flavor for the wide variety of projects we’ll be showcasing this June 17-18 in Amsterdam. We hope to see you there!

 

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QS17 Preview: Managing Parkinsons 8,765 Hours a Year

Selfcare-infographic-English-278x300Sara Riggare: “I will share how I work to keep up with my progressive neurological illness by tweaking and re-tweaking my medications, including what I’ve learned from the most recent changes to my Parkinson’s medication.”

I love this clear illustration of the value of health-tracking between visits to the doctor – especially for disease management. At QS17, Sara will share the insights health tracking has allowed her to glean from decades of experience with Parkinson’s.

Managing Parkinson’s disease requires constant tuning. The symptoms result from decreased dopaminergic signaling from a brain region that helps set the tone for our movements. Without enough dopamine, movement is slow or impossible. Too much and movement is fidgety or ballistic. To add to the complication, the natural levels of dopamine in the brain fluctuate throughout the day – meaning that the same medication  affects a patient differently depending on when it is taken. This makes Parkinson’s management a careful balancing act – not something that can be calibrated in just one doctor appointment per year.

Sara makes great use of the 8,765 hours she’s not in the doctor’s office to keep a record of how exercise, sleep, and shifts in the complicated dosing of her medications influence her symptoms. She has put her self-tracking to scientific use by conducting graduate research at the Karolinska Institute, and has been called “a thought leader in Parkinson’s in the new age of social media.” We’re excited to hear at QS17 how she re-calibrated her doses after adding a new medication to her drug regiment.

Just a few more weeks until the 2017 Quantified Self Global Conference! We can’t wait.

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