Tag Archives: show&tell

What is a Quantified Self Conference?

If you’ve seen the announcement for our 2015 QS Conference & Expo and you’ve never been to a QS event before you may be asking yourself what our conferences are all about. From our very first meetup in 2008 through our six conferences and numerous events we’ve emphasized the role of the personal story and real-world experience. We do this in a variety of ways.

First, we run our conferences as a carefully curated unconference. When you register, you’re asked to tell us about the self-tracking projects you’re working on and other QS-related ideas you have. Our conference organization team goes through every registration, diving deep into personal websites, Twitter feeds, and blog posts. We love seeing individuals using self-tracking in new and different ways to find out something interesting about themselves and we work hard to surface truly unique and inspiring stories.

How does that manifest itself in the program? The core of our conference program is made up of the nearly two dozen show&tell talks where self-trackers get up and tell their story by answering our three prime questions: What did you do? How did you do it? What did you learn? It may seem simple, but these three questions provide a stable and consistent narrative to inspire you to learn and engage with your own tracking practice in new and different ways.

We’ve spent some time combing through our vast video archive to showcase some of our favorite talks from our previous conferences. We hope you find them enjoyable and they inspire you to join us on March 13-15 in San Francisco for our 2015 QS Conference & Expo. Who knows, maybe you’ll be on stage and we’ll be learning from you!

Sara Riggare on ‘How Not To Fall’
Sara Riggare is co-organizer of Quantified Self Stockholm. She is also an engineer, a PhD student and a tireless researcher of Parkinson’s disease. In this fascinating talk, Sara describes using body sensors to help her control her gait.

Vivian Ming on Tracking Her Son’s Diabetes
Vivienne Ming is an accomplished neuroscientist and entrepreneur. Two years ago her son, Felix, was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes. In this talk, presented at the 2013 Quantified Self Global Conference, Vivienne explains what they’re learning as they track and analyze his data

Chris Bartley on Understanding Chronic Fatigue
While on a research trip, Chris contracted Reiter’s Syndrome. After his recovered, something still didn’t feel right. Chris consulted his physician and started tracking his wellness along with his diet and supplement intake. What follows is an amazing story about what Chris learned when he started applying his knowledge of statistics to his own data.

Adrienne Andrew Slaughter on Tracking Carbs and Exercise
Adrienne Andrew Slaughter was testing out a new diet that included carbohydrate restriction. At the same time she was commuting to work on a bike. She started to notice feeling tired and slow during her commutes and wondered if her dietary changes had anything to do with it. Luckily, Adrienne was tracking her commutes and her diet and was able to run detailed data analysis to find out what happens when she goes carbless.

Bob Troia: Understanding My Blood Glucose
Bob Troia isn’t a diabetic and he’s not out of range, but he wanted to see if he could lower his fasting glucose levels. He started a long-term tracking experiment where he tested his blood glucose and began to explore the effects of supplementation and lifestyle factors.

Sacha Chua on Building and Using A Personal Dashboard
Sacha Chua started tracking her clothes to make sure she was varying her wardrobe on daily basis. This led he to ask, “What else can I track?” As she added time tracking, food, library books, and so much more (you can view the whole set on QuantifiedAwesome.com)

Robby Macdonnell on Tracking 8,000 Screen Hours
For the last six years Robby Macdonnell has been tracking his productivity and how he spends his time on his various computers (home and work) and even how he uses phone. Over those years he’s amassed 8,300 hours of screen time. Watch his great talk to hear what’s he learned about his work habits, productivity and how he’s come to think about time.

Sky Christopherson on Self-Tracking at the London Olympics
Sky Christopherson first shared his experience with tracking and improving his sleep in 2012. That tracking led him on a path to achieving a world record as a mastars level track cyclists. Later that year, Sky began helping other athletes us self-tracking and personal data to obtain their best performances, culminating in a surprise silver medal for the 2012 women’s olympic track cycling team, on which he served as a training advisor. In March of this year, Sky and his wife Tamara gave another QS talk at our Bay Area Meetup in which they told the wonderful story of how the 2012 Olympic team rode to their medal, a journey captured in the documentary, Personal Gold.

These are only a small sample of the amazing talks and self-tracking projects that are shared at our Quantified Self Conferences. We’d love to hear your story. Register today and let us know what you’re working on!

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What We Are Reading

Enjoy this week’s list!

Articles
Effect of Self-monitoring and Medication Self-titration on Systolic Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Patients at High Risk of Cardiovascular Disease by Richard McManus et al. An interesting research paper here about using self-monitoring to reduce blood pressure. The paper is behind a paywall, but since you’re nice we’ve put a copy here.

Apple Prohibits HealthKit App Developers From Selling Health Data by Mark Sullivan. Some interesting news here from Apple in advance of their new phone and possible device release in a few weeks. I applaud the move, but would like to see more information about data portability in the next release.

Science Advisor, Larry Smarr by 23andMe. Great to hear our friends 23andMe and Larry Smarr are getting together to help work on understanding Inflammatory Bowel Disease. If you’ve been diagnosed with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis consider joining the study.

Personal Health Data: It’s Amazing Potential and Privacy Perils by Beth Kanter. A lot of people have been talking recently about the privacy implications of using different tracking tools and technologies. In this short post Beth opens up some interesting questions about why we might or might not open up our personal data to others. Make sure to read through for some insightful comments as well.

Show&Tell
Let’s Talk About 3 Months of Self-Quantifying by Frank Rousseau. Frank is one of the founders of Cozy Cloud, a personal could service. He’s also designed Kyou a custom tracker system built on top of Cozy. He’s also been using the services to track his life. In this post he explain how tracking his activity, sleep, weight, and other habits led to some interesting insights about his behavior.

The iPhone 5S’ M7 Predictor as a Predictor of Fitbit Steps by Zach Jones. A great post here by Zach as he explores the data taken from his iPhone 5S vs. his Fitbit.

Using Open Data to Predict When You Might Get Your Next Parking Ticket by Ben Wellington. Not strictly a personal data show&tell here, but as someone who suffers from street sweeping parking tickets somewhat frequently I found this post fascinating. Now to see if Los Angeles has open data…

Visualizations
RWTime
What Time of Day Do People Run? by Robert James Reese, Dan Fuehrer, and Christine Fennessay. Runners World and Runkeeper partnered to understand the running habits of runners around the world. Some interesting insights here!

FitbitMin
What Happens When You Graduate and Get a Real Job by Reddit user matei1987. A really neat visualization of min-by-min level Fitbit step data.

DataDesign
Data + Design by Infoactive and the Donald W. Reynolds Institute. A really interesting and unique take on a data visualization book. This CC-licensed, open source, and collaborative project represents the work of many volunteers. I’ve only read through a few chapters, but it seems to be a wonderful resource for anyone working in data visualization.

From the Forum
Good Morning World!
Quantified Chess
New Activity Tracker to Replace BodyMedia?
Indirect Mood Measures
OPI TrueSense for Sleep Tracking

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What We're Reading

Enjoy this week’s list!

Articles
CGM in the Cloud: Personal Preferences by Kerri Sparling. A great blog post here by Kerri who explains why it’s so important to have access to her blood sugar data. She’s part of a growing community of people with diabetes who are using different methods to broadcast their CGM data into the could.

On Minorities and Outliers: The Case for Making Big Data Small by Brooke Foucault Welles. The rush towards finding the answers in “Big Data” might lead to the continued exclusion of the women, minorities, and the “outliers” of the world. Brooke makes the case here for examining these “small datasets”  to give them the weight they deserve.

“When women and minorities are excluded as subjects of basic social science research, there is a tendency to identify majority experiences as “normal,” and discuss minority experiences in terms of how they deviate from those norms . In doing so, women, minorities, and the statistically underrepresented are problematically written into the margins of social science, discussed only in terms of their differences, or else excluded altogether.”

Here’s Looking at You: How Personal Health Information Is Being Tracked and Used [PDF] by Jane Sarashon-Kahn. In this report, from the California Healthcare Foundation, Jane lays out how our health data is being acquired and used, for commercial and public benefit. I especially liked the emphasis on privacy, or lack there of.

The Making of April Zero by Anand Sharma. Anand details his journey from starting to self-track to creating an amazing website that serves as his personal QS dashboard. One interesting bit is that his tracking activities increased dramatically after Apple’s M7 chip came out with the iPhone 5S and he noticed that his phone’s battery took much less of a hit from running apps that track his activity in the background.

Show&Tells
Tracking Upset and Recovery by Paul LaFontaine. Paul has been using the Heartmath stress monitor to help him record and understand what causes him to get upset (fall out of coherence). In this post, he details how his recovery method has helped him progress, recover, and slightly reduce the number of upsets during his working session. I recommend reading all of Paul’s great posts on this work.

Europe Honeymoon by reddit user Glorypants. This reddit user tracked his European honeymoon with the Moves app and then used our How to Map Your Moves Data post to learn how to make some great maps to share his experience.

Visualizations
Lillian_YIR
This Year in Numbers – 2014 by Lillian Karabaic. A great “year in review” post here that details the tracking Lillian has done from July 2013 to July 2014. I love the mix of hand-drawn and computer-generate visualizations that provide insight into Lillian’s sleep, diet, cycling, mood, and communication data. (Editor’s Note: Lillian sent this link via the comments on Quantifiedself.com. If you have something to share please let us know!)

HelpMeViz
HelpMeViz.com. I wanted to highlight this great website and community project as we have many great visualization and data scientists in our community. On the HelpMeViz website people submit their visualizations for feedback and assistance. I’ve had fun interacting with the growing community and have even learned a few neat tricks in the process.

TravisHodges
The Quantified Self by Travis Hodges. Travis is a portrait photographer based in London. For his newest project he sought out fifteen individuals who are using self-tracking to understand and improve themselves. I especially like the inclusion of the data visualizations coupled with the individual stories from these self-trackers.

TwitterViz
Visualizing Your Twitter Conversations by Jon Bulava. Jon, a Developer Advocate at Twitter, put together a wonderful how-to for getting started on visualizing your friend network on Twitter. (If you’re interested in using the new Twitter Analytics data to better understand your tweeting we suggest Bill Johnson’s great how-to.)

From the Forum
Data Aggregation
Smart Mirror with Health Sensors
Garmin Vivo Activity Tracker – Your Results?
Sleep Tracking for New Parents

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This Week's QS Meetups

If you’re interested in learning more about Quantified Self, meeting new and interesting people, and being inspired by unique self-tracking projects we invite you attend a local QS meetup in your area. This week there are nine QS meet ups planned all over the world. Follow the links below to learn more. You can also find the full list of the over 100 QS meet ups in the right sidebar. Don’t see one near you? Why not start your own!

Tuesday (7/15/14)
Southern Oregon Quantified Self  (Ashland, OR)

Auckland QS Show&Tell #6

Malta QS Show&Tell #2

Wednesday (7/16/14)
Dallas/Fort-Worth QS Meetup

Cincinnati QS Hangout #1

Triangle QS Meetup (Raleigh, NC)

Washington DC QS Meetup

Thursday (7/17/14)
Silicon Valley QS Meetup #12 (Mountain View, CA)

Melbourne QS Show&Tell #6

 

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What We Are Reading

We’ve assembled another great list of articles, posts, and other interesting ideas for you to enjoy.

Articles
Billy Beane’s Ascendant A’s Are Playing a Brand-New Brand of Moneyball by Will Leitch. I know what you’re thinking, “What’s an article about baseball doing in this list?” First, it’s about how the Oakland Athletics are using metrics to improve their team. And two, I was struck by the following:

“Instead, Beane and his front office have bought in bulk: They’ve brought in as many guys as possible and seen who performed. They weren’t looking for something that no one else saw: They amassed bodies, pitted them against one another, were open to anything, and just looked to see who emerged. Roger Ebert once wrote that the muse visits during the act of creation, rather than before. The A’s have made it a philosophy to just try out as many people as possible—cheap, interchangeable ones—and pluck out the best.”

Sounds a lot like our old friend, Seth Roberts, describing the value of self-experimentation - start small, do a lot of them, learn by doing.

Build Great Models . . . Throw Them Away by Mark Ravina. A digital humanities researcher makes the case for using data and statistical methods of modeling not to answer questions, but to come up with better questions. Really enjoyed the great examples in this post.

App data reveals locations, times and distances of Calgary’s runners and cyclists by Meghan Jessiman. A collaboration between RunKeeper and the local Calgary Herald newspaper led to some interesting findings and, of course, some activity heat maps.

A Digital Dose of Magic Medicine by Naveen Rao. Naveen connects the dots between the recent controversy surrounding Doctor Oz to the possibly misplaced hopes we’re putting in tools like HealthKit.

9-Volt Nirvana by RadioLab. This episode of the always interesting RadioLab tells the story of a journalist who was hooked up to a tDCS device for a sniper shooting exercise. The device helped her accuracy in the simulation, but then there was an unexpected after-effect. For three days afterward, the voices of self-doubt and self-abnegation receded from her consciousness. She talks about that experience directly on her blog. (Thanks to Steven Jonas for sending this one in!)

Tracking Sleep With Your Phone by Belle Beth Cooper. A great roundup here of iOS and Android apps you can use to track sleep. I especially appreciated the nice discussion of the current limitations of using mobile apps to track and understand sleep.

From Missiles To The Pitch: The Story Behind World Cup Tech by Melissa Block and NPR. If you’re wondering how FIFA is able to track the movement of individuals players during this year’s World Cup then this is for you. You can also check out all the data on FIFA’s website here.

Show&Tell
Productivity, the Quantified Self and Getting an Office by Bob Tabor. Bob works at home and was curious about how productive he really was. After using RescueTime he realized maybe he wasn’t getting the productive time he really need.

Basis to Roambi by Florian Lissot. Florian wanted to explore his Basis data. After using Bob Troia’s great data access script and some additional tools to aggregate multiple files he was able to create some great visualizations with Roambi and learn a bit more about his daily patterns of activity.

Do you have a self-tracking story you want to share? Submit it now!

Visualizations
losangeles-transport
How We Move in Cities by Human.co. It seems that making heatmaps based on movement is all the rage these days. Human has gone one step further than previous entries in this category by including motorized travel alongside cycling, walking, and running data. Don’t forget to check out the amazing GIFs as well.

cecinestunedataviz
This is Not a Data Visualization by Michael Thompson.

“[...] visualizations are not the data. The data is not the sum of the experience. We’ve been inappropriately using data visualizations as the basis for statements and conclusions. We’re leaving out rigorous statistical analysis, and appropriate qualifiers such as confidence intervals. It’s exciting that we’ve become more and more a society of pattern-seekers. But it’s important that we don’t become lazy and cavalier with what we do with those observations.”

MSFTdataviz
Reflections on How Designers Design With Data [PDF] by Alex Bigelow, Steven Drucker, Danyel Fisher, and Miriah Meyer. Researchers from Microsoft and the University of Utah sought out to understand how designers go the process of understanding data and creating unique visualizations.

Do you have a QS data visualization you want to share? Submit it now!

From the Forum
Best passive GPS Logger?
Quantified Baby
Android App for Self Surveys

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What We Are Reading

We’ve compiled another list of interesting personal data and Quantified Self articles, self-tracking stories, and data visualizations. Enjoy!

Articles

Experimental evidence of massive-scale emotional contagion through social networks by Adam Kramer, Jamie Guillory, and Jeffrey Hancock. Facebook engaged in a large study to see if emotional states could be transferred/changed via the emotional content of the News Feed. A lot of hubbub recently about this research article related to what it means to knowingly consent to research.

Who Owns Your Personal Data: The Incorporated Woman. Jennifer Morone has added herself to a long list of individuals making a statement against the commercialization of personal data. What started as a design assignment has morphed into a statement against others profiting and controlling personal data. (Immediately remind me of this Kickstarter project.)

Quantified Self and the Ethics of Personal Data by Ian Forrester. Ian does a great job here of exploring current conversations about the variety of ethical questions that come with creating, using, and owning personal data.

Visualizing Algorithms by Mike Bostock. Mike is the creator and steward of the d3.js data visualization library. In this fascinating post, he recounts one of his recent talks about how visualization can be used to understand how algorithms work.

“[...] algorithms are also a reminder that visualization is more than a tool for finding patterns in data. Visualization leverages the human visual system to augment human intellect: we can use it to better understand these important abstract processes, and perhaps other things, too.”

Biometric Shirt for Astronauts Gets Antarctic Tryout by Eliza Strickland. Eliza describes a “try-out” for using self-tracking technology to better understand vital signs and activity during space travel.

Show&Tell

My Solution for Quantified Self: Prompted Data Aggregation by Jonathan Cutrell. Jonathan decided to build his own simple system for self-directed data collection prompts. “While they may be simple data points, and while the questions will repeat, the concept is simple: my computer asks me a question, and tracks my answer for me.”

Quantified Splunk: Tracking My Vital Signs by David Greenwood. David describes how he uses Splunk, a data monitoring and analysis tool, to help him track and make sense of new personal health data he’s collecting. It will be interesting to see what he learns as he starts adding and exploring more of his self-tracking data.

How I Wrote 400K Words in a Year by Jaime Todd Rubin. In March of 2013, Jaime decided he was going to try and write every day. In this post he describes some of the lessons he learned through tracking his writing practice. I was particularly drawn to his methods for tracking all his writing through Google Docs.

Do you have a self-tracking story you want to share? Submit it now!

Visualizations

Withings-via-IFTTTCharting Withings Data Using IFTTT, Google Spreadsheets, and d3.js by Dan Harrington. Dan didn’t like the way Withings presented weight data in it’s visualization. So, he put together a tutorial to show how you can grab your Withings data via IFTTT, import it into a Google Spreadsheet, then visualize it using d3.js, an open-source data visualization library.

 

 

MapRunKeeper1.5 Million Walks, Runs, and Bike Rides by Mapbox and RunKeeper. The Mapbox team worked with Runkeeper to map publicly shared routes. Really interesting to zoom around the world map to see where people who use RunKeeper are exercising.

 

 

Do you have a QS data visualization you want to share? Submit it now!

From the Forum

HealthKit
Lifelogging via Calendar Application
Help Analyzing Text Files?
Breakout: Productivity Tracking

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What We Are Reading

We’ve compiled quite the variety of articles and links for you. Make sure to check out the show&tell and visualization sections below for some great Quantified Self examples. Enjoy!

Articles & Posts
To lead off today’s list I’m including two great posts from attendees at our recent 2014 QS Europe Conference. You can read more attendee recaps over onour roundup post.

Ten Things I Learned at the 2014 Quantified Self Europe Conference by Bob Troia. Bob takes a look back at the conference and describes his experience.

Quantified Self and Philosophy at #QSEU14 by Kitty Ireland. We hosted over 36 breakout discussion at our recent European Conference. In this post, Kitty describes one of the “standout sessions” that she attended.

Okay, back to list!

Wearable Computers Will Transform Language by Ariel Bleicher. This is a long piece, full of excellent examples of how personal personal computing is becoming, but my favorite leads the article. Wearable computers in 1961. Who knew!

CyclePhilly hopes to record biking patterns to help plan bike lanes by Jim Smiley. A big theme of our discussions at various QS events this year has been around the social and public good the personal data can do. This project, led by Corey Acri and Code for Philly, hopes to better understand where commuters are actually riding their bikes. This also reminded me of a recent data sharing deal between Strava (a GPS activity tracking app) and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

How Much Can We Demand of Consumer Connected Health? by Joseph Kvedar. We’ve mentioned this before on both the QS blog and in the reading list, self-tracking device accuracy is a tricky concept. In this short post Dr. Kvedar describes his experiences and some results using consumer tools in a clinical setting.

In-Depth: How Patient Generated Health Data is Evolving Into one of Healthcare’s Biggest Trends by MobiHealthNews. This is a nice long piece covering many aspects of the growing role of different types of health data in healthcare. I personally enjoyed learning more about the challenge of combining patient reported data with electronic medical records.

Show&Tell
Treadmill Effect of Spaced Repetition Performance by Gwern. In this exhaustive examination, our friend Gwern decided to test whether walking on a treadmill helped his memory. Specifically he randomized if practiced his spaced repetition while walking at his treadmill desk or sitting down and then looked at his grades (flashcards remembered correctly). You’ll have to read it to see what he foun. (Make sure to check out his other experiments as well!)

My Sleep Cycle Experiment and What to Limit Before Bed by Greg Blome. This is a great breakdown of what Greg found out about what affects his sleep by tracking 150 nights of sleep with the Sleep Cycle app.

Learning Ancient Egyptian in an Hour Per Week with Beeminder by Eric Kidd. Here at QS Labs we have a soft spot for spaced repetition (See Gary Wolf’s great primer here). This post details how Eric learned how to read Egyptian hieroglyphs using spaced repetition and Beeminder.

Visualizations
OpenVis Conference. Here you’ll find 18 great presentations by leading data visualization experts. Hard to pick a favorite, but I found Andy Kirks, The Design of Nothing: Null, Zero, Blank to be fascinating.

RunkeeperBreezeBreeze Habits by Runkeeper. The data science team at Runkeeper took a look at 75,000 worldwide Breeze App users to see what countries were getting up earlier, going to sleep later, and getting the most steps. I can’t wait to see more visualizations like this from Runkeeper.

 

 

 

Tableau Quantified Self Viz Contest. We mentioned this is last week’s reading list and the contest has is now over and we get to peruse the great entries. I’m going to include some of my favorites below, but make sure to check out all of them at the link above. You can also view the winners here.

spanglerThe Life of Spangler by Russell Spangler. Russell tracked his time for the month of April and presents the results.

 

 

 

 

rundergroundRunderground by Carl Allchin. Have you ever wondered if it’s faster to run than take the tube in London? Carl has your answer.

 

 

 

 

beatingdiabetesBeating Diabetes by Andre Argenton. Andre accessed the data in his Dexcom continuous glucose monitor and visualized it alongside data from his OmniPod insulin pump.

 

 

 

From The Forum
Measuring Cognitive Perormance

How To Track Smoking

Quantified Self Reading List (books)

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What We Are Reading

Enjoy these links, posts, and articles from around the web.

Health Care Apps Offer Patients an Active Role by Ann Carrns. A nice overview of different DIY health apps and connected home medical devices.

Getting the most out of RescueTime for your Quantified Self projects by Robby Macdonell. If you’re using RescueTime to track your computer use and productivity there are many options for extending the built in data analysis. This great post by Robby, who spoke about tracking his productivity at our 2013 Global Conference, showcases a few different methods. If you use one to look at your own data let us know in the comments or on the forum.

Downloading Your Email Metadata by Nathan Yau. Another nice how-to post from Nathan on FlowingData.com. Email is an area of rich information and most of time that data is left in the vaults of our email providers. This tutorial provides a great instruction set for gathering that data using Python.

20 Day Stranger by Playful Systems and the Center at MIT. An interesting project that will sync self-tracking data with a stranger for 20 days. It’s not in production yet, but you can apply to be a part of their trial. I’m really intrigued by the idea of sharing anonymously with strangers and what you might be able to learn about another person.

Spurious Correlations, Quantified Self, and the Health Care System by Martin Spindler. Do steps calculated, counted, and correlated by the smart pedometers of today actually improve lives?

Meet the Godfather of Wearables by Maria Konnikova. A really nice long read biographic piece on Alex “Sandy” Pentland. Sandy is responsible for running one of the most innovating research and design labs at MIT. Chances are that if you’re reading this then you’ve interacted with some bit of technology that originated with Sandy and his students.

Show & Tell

Fixing Sleep with Low Blue Light. This simple, but fantastic explanation of how one individual moved up his waking time by reducing his exposure to blue light.

Quantified Self: Three Months Later by Adam Sigel. This is a nice post about how different apps and tools helped Adam engage with his health and learn more about his life.

Visualizations

EdwardSnowVisualizing Zero: How to Show Something with Nothing by Andy Kirk. We’ve had some great discussions at recent Bay Area QS Meetups about the meaning of missing data. This short piece has some great examples of how the absence of data can be an important part of the story.

 

 

MoodMapMood Maps by Erin Hedrington. Some beautiful quantified self artwork here by Erin.

 

 

 

 

DataCrystalsWorld Data Crystals by Scott Kildall. Scott takes data sets and turns them into 3D printed representations.

 

 

 

 

From the Forum

Indoor Air Quality Monitoring

Discreet Stress Monitoring in Real Time

Inside Tracker Review

Which Wearables Have CSV Export

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2014 QS Europe Conference: Show&Tell Talks

What did you do? How did you do it? What did you learn?

These are the three questions we ask people to answer in their Quantified Self Show&Tell talks. We’re thrilled to see the Show&Tell proposals coming in from registrants for the 2014 Quantified Self Europe Conference, with topics ranging from blood glucose tracking to novel uses of spaced repetition for memory training. The current Show&Tell lineup is previewed below. We hope you can join us!

Understanding My Blood Glucose
Bob Troia
After learning he had an elevated risk for contracting Type 2 Diabetes, Bob starting tracking daily glucose measurements, exercise, diet, and supplements.

Connecting My Mind And Body
Juliana Chua
Juliana used data from activity, sleep, heart rate, and stress sensors to explore the effects of mindfulness on her physical condition.

Carbless in Seattle
Adrienne Andrew Slaughter
Trying out diets with different amounts of carbs, Adrienne saw unexpected effects on her athletic performance.

A Million Heartbeats
Crt Ahlin
Can a day of heart beat data be accurately represented with a simple curve, for establishing baselines and comparisons?

Retraining My Body With Electrical Nerve Stimulation
Sara Riggare
Sara’s self-tracking data convinced her to try using Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation to address her most troublesome Parkinson’s symptom, “freezing-of-gait”.

Me and My Log
Cathal Gurrin
Cathal lifelogging data comes from a camera that takes a constant stream of photos, wherever he is.

Fit 50s Sound 60s
Maria Benet
Maria has been tracking for almost 10 years, developing strategies for improving and maintaining her health as she ages.

Optimizing Productivity
Brian Crain
After many productivity experiments, Brian finally made progress with the Pomodoro method in 2011. He’ll show his continuing experiments to increase his focus and productivity.

Memorizing My Daybook
Steven Jonas
Steven wanted to see what happened when he memorized entries from his daybook using spaced repetition.

A Goal for Each Month
Florian Schumacher
In the beginning of 2014 Florian set himself twelve goals, one per month. He’ll show data from the first three months.

A Testosterone and Diet Experiment
Maximilian Gotzler
Blood tests showed Max he had low levels of Vitamin D and Testosterone. Could diet changes help?

Analyzing Changes in My Weight and Sleep
Kouris Kalligas
Kouris spent thirty hours combining his multiple data streams into one place, and learned what influenced his weight and sleep.

Does Diet Affect My Sleep?
Denise Lorenz
Denise shows a year’s worth of data from her diet and sleep experiment and finds while food matters a little, other things matter more.

A Four Year Journal
Morris Villarroel
Morris links a detailed handwritten journal to quantitative analysis and visualization.

A Librarian in Numbers
Debbie Chaves
Academic librarians work in a complex environment. Debbie will describe how her tracking changed the way she worked.

A Lazy Workout
Justin Timmer
Does just squeezing your muscles make them stronger? Justin will talk about his experiments with an isometric training program.

We Never Fight On Wednesdays
Paul LaFontaine
Six months of tracking mood alongside events, time and people gave Paul some surprising lessons.

Meta-Effects of Happiness Tracking
Alex Tarling
How does asking yourself if you are happy change your happiness?

Science, Smell, Fashion
Jenny Tillotson
Jenny will tell a ‘science fashion’ story that introduces real-time biofeedback scent interventions as a means to complement orthodox treatments for chronic mental illness and to de-stigmatise mental health issues.

Lifelog as Self-Portrait
Cors Brinkman
Using automatic lifelogging and visualization software Cors is experimenting with putting his computer in charge of his creativity.

Washing My Eyelids
Steve Dean
Steve will demonstrate how he used self-tracking tools to get under atopic dermatitis.

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