Tag Archives: siliconvalley

Amelia Greenhall on Using Moving Averages for Maintenance

We’ve posted some great talks by Amelia Greenhall here on the blog and we’re excited to bring you another insightful presentation. Last year Amelia gave a wonderful talk about her weight loss journey and the power of using running averages. In this updated talk Amelia gives a more in-depth look about how using a 10-day moving average serves as an “early warning system” that puts helps put her back on the path of mindful eating. Filmed at the QS Silicon Valley meetup group

Posted in Videos | Tagged , , , , , , , | 11 Comments

Ari Berwaldt on Sleep, Cognition and Fasting

Ari Berwaldt wanted to better understand how his sleep affected his mental performance. In this great talk Ari explains his insights from tracking his cognitive skills using Quantified Mind and some surprising results about the lack of correlation between his Zeo data and his mental performance. Make sure to keep watching as Ari also explains some very interesting data and conclusions from blood glucose and ketone tracking during fasting. Filmed at the QS Silicon Valley meetup group.

Posted in Videos | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Lisa Betts-LaCroix on Tales of Weight Tracking

Lisa Betts-LaCroix has been tracking her weight off and on since 2000. In this Show & Tell talk at the recent Silicon Valley QS meetup Lisa details the trials and tribulations that go along with attempting to track her weight and other associated behavioral variables. From simple excel spreadsheets to using Google forms to finally using the Withings wireless scale Lisa explains why and how she’s finally been successful at reducing her weight. Watch this insightful video to see what Lisa feels are the keys to self-tracking tracking and feedback mechanisms.

Lisa Betts-LaCroix – Tales of Weight Tracking from Gary Wolf on Vimeo.

Posted in Videos | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Gary Wolf on MetaQS and Meditation

QS founder Gary Wolf speaks at the Silicon Valley QS meetup group, giving a meta look at what Quantified Self is about, followed by a personal show&tell about his meditation data.

Posted in Videos | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

David Fetherstonhaugh on The Step Exchange Game

Imagine a few dozen people walking, running, jumping, jiggling their legs up and down, and introducing themselves to each other while competing on two teams. This was the scene at a recent Silicon Valley QS meetup hosted by IDEO. In the video below, David Fetherstonhaugh explains the fun, called The Step Exchange Game. The game was designed to mobilize people in large social groups to move around and meet each other. It was an exciting evening!

Posted in Videos | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Fenn Lipkowitz and his Amazing Lifelog

Self-described hacker Fenn Lipkowitz gives a rich update to his lifelogging activities in the video below. Fenn created a detailed diary with start and stop times as a simple text file, generating a color-coded chart of daily activities.

During his experimentation, Fenn began to read about the Life Extension Foundation and visited a site known as Longecity, a community of self experimenters who share experiences on the neurochemistry of cognition.  In addition to monitoring and tabulating the time spent in various activities, Fenn also experimented with supplementation of various nootropic compounds to improve cognition and neural activity.  The compounds he used included amino acids, vitamins, fish oil, and ginkgo extract.

Fenn discovered drastic changes before and after his use of nootropics. Subjectively, he used a numerical scale and quantified his level of energy.  A graph showing a moving average of these values indicated a significant increase in his subjective assessment of his energy level.

Objectively, he performed typing tests as well as other brain training test found on Lumosity.  His typing speed increased from a maximum of 92 to 143 after the use of nootropics. Fenn also lost 15 pounds, now has a girlfriend, and said he feels like a different person.

Another interesting component of Fenn’s lifelogging was his tabulation of all the food he ate over an extended period of time. Fenn found that his logging of food preferences has caused him to no longer be addicted to sugar. Fenn’s lifelogging website as well as the source code for the program that he used can be found here: http://fennetic.net/sleep/

(Filmed at the Silicon Valley QS meetup at Stanford University.)

Posted in Videos | Tagged , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Wako Takayama: Line-Dried Clothes Smell So Good

Wako Takayama loves the smell of line-dried clothes. She also likes that it’s a way to conserve energy. In this video, Wako reflects on methods she developed to increase energy conservation after moving from an apartment to a home. Her personal experiences resulted in her becoming trained as an energy efficiency consultant and volunteering in a local organization that teaches energy efficiency methods and performs audits in the community. Interestingly, for dryer usage data, tracking blank days made her happy. (Filmed at Silicon Valley QS Meetup #2.)

Posted in Videos | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Eri Gentry on Social QS Studies

Eri Gentry describes her presentation ‘Social Studies’ as “like Quantified Self, but Quantified Us!”

She has always been wiling to be a participant in normal experiments; however, she now realizes that she wants her data to improve herself. Now she uses Genomera.com to run her own experiments that allow the participants to be actively involved in the process and openly share the data, observations and insights.

In this video she shares the results of the first Butter Mind group experiment and mentions how experiments usually lead to more questions, and now she is creating ‘Butter Mind 2’ and following her curiosity about sleep by creating another study ‘Orange you Sleepy’ – check it out! (Filmed at the Quantified Self Silicon Valley meetup at Stanford’s Calming Technologies lab.)

Posted in Videos | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Joe Betts-LaCroix on Fitbit vs. Zeo

The entertaining and curious Joe Betts-Lacroix shares his investigation to decide which device he will use to track sleep. He includes how he uses each device, his opinions and how one device makes him feel that his sleep matters! (Filmed at the Quantified Self Silicon Valley meetup at Stanford’s Calming Technologies lab.)

Posted in Videos | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Neema Moraveji on Perfect Self-Awareness

–This review was written by Ryan Viglizzo for my class DIY Health at NYU ITP (Tisch School of the Arts). In this class, students design systems of self-care that help people take stock of themselves by exploring ways to measure, reflect and act upon their health and lifestyle.–

Moraveji asks, “What would it be like to have perfect self awareness?” His talk suggests that having perfect self-awareness means having an optimized mind. He describes an optimized mind as one that is calm, aware, and emotional but not driven by emotions.  Moraveji points out that we can achieve this state of mind by changing and self-tracking our breath.  Moraveji focused on social influence and staring at a computer screen to test change in breath rate. I would like to relate his talk to exercise.

As a runner, it took me years of doing the sport to start understanding the importance of breath.  As we run we get better—run longer distances, feel better, and increase our speed. I realized that when I trained I trained my breath. I controlled my breath; which inadvertently taught me how to manage my body. This poses the question—Can we teach our body to regulate or does our body teach us to regulate?

Moraveji explains that breath connects all of the body’s major and vital nervous systems. If we use our mind self to regulate our breath, our body follows.  I would say agree with this notion. When I run I think about relaxation. I think about my breath being steady, calm and rhythmic. As I think about that I fall into my pace with my breath and my body’s nervous system follows. It all starts with my mind.

This process can be described in a first order feedback loop. Goal: become relaxed, efficient and calm during the run. Action: Thinking about and making breath rhythmic, calm and steady. Environmental distractions: increasing pace, other runners, weather, change of terrain, etc. Sensing/monitoring: BMP (breaths per min.) Comparing my states: Am I breathing slower and feeling calmer as I run? If so I achieved my goal. If not I go back to Action (to start loop over).

I see the breath as a function that is controlled by our mental intention. As we calm our breath it triggers the body’s nervous system to sit at a certain resting state. I think Moraveji is trying to make people aware of the fact that if we are conscious of our breath we can improve our self-awareness and in turn be more productive, happy, and clear.

One issue I had was that Moraveji only measures breath solely on breath rate. I feel like there are other parameters of breath that needed to be included in his study. The study also touched on social motivation. I think that the social motivation piece is not a constant in its ability to keep people self-monitoring.

Posted in Videos | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments