Tag Archives: sleep

Tracking the Recovery Process: Learn from Maggie Delano at QS15

Join us at our upcoming QS15 Global Conference and Exposition on June 18-20 in San Francisco to learn how to use self-tracking tools to aid in recovery and get back into a productive lifestyle without overdoing it.

MKD_headshot

Maggie Delano was diagosed with Post Concussion Syndrome (PCS) after hitting her head over Labor Day Weekend. To recover, she had to give her brain a break from anything too cognitively stimulating, such as using screens, reading, intense physical exercise, and loud music. Maggie was able to return to work after several weeks off. She has developed strategies that balance getting work done with giving her brain a rest and preventing burnout. She’s been using apps such as Awareness to keep her mindful of how much time she’s spending on her computer, HabitRPG to slowly build back up her prior habits and self-tracking, and Beddit to help figure out what allows her to sleep best.

maggied_beddit

Maggie’s session is just one of the many hands-on, up-to-date, expertly moderated sessions we’re planning for the QS15 Global Conference and Exposition. This year, QS15 is going to be two full days of self-tracking talks, demos, and in depth discussion, followed by a third day for a grand public exposition of the latest self-tracking tools. Join us at the Fort Mason Center on the San Francisco Waterfront. We’ve made some early bird tickets available for readers of the Quantified Self blog (for a limited time): Register here!

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Ben Finn: Improving My Sleep

Benn Finn has been battling issues with his sleep ever since he was a teenager. His sleep was suffering from the usual problems we’ve all faced: taking too long to get to sleep, waking up too often, waking up late, and being tired during the day. He made plan to fix his issues by researching what affects sleep and then experimenting to find out what worked for him. For four months he tracked his sleep using Sleep Cycle along with 21 factors that he thought might affect his sleep. He also created a “sleep quality” score based on 5 different data points, including data from the Sleep Cycle app. In this talk, presented at the London QS meetup group, Ben describes his experiments, what he learned from analyzing his data, and how he finally ended up fixing his sleep issues. (Special thank you to Ken Snyder for his valuable work documenting the talks at QS London.)

BenFinn_Sleep
Slides are also available here.

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What We Are Reading

We hope you enjoy this week’s list of articles, posts, show&tell descriptions, and visualizations!

Articles
I’m Terrified of My New TV: Why I’m Scared to Turn This Thing On — And You’d Be, Too by Michael Price. Michael, a lawyer at the Brennan Center for Justice at the NYU School of Law, describes his experiences with his new “smart” TV. More sensors means more records being stored somewhere you might not have access to. Especially interesting when your device picks up every word you say:

“But the service comes with a rather ominous warning: ‘Please be aware that if your spoken words include personal or other sensitive information, that information will be among the data captured and transmitted to a third party.’ Got that? Don’t say personal or sensitive stuff in front of the TV.”

Public Perceptions of Privacy and Security in the Post-Snowden Era by Mary Madden. A great report from the Pew Research Internet Project. I don’t want to give away any of the juicy stats so head over and read the executive summary.

This Is What Happens When Scientists Go Surfing by Nate Hoppes. It’s not all privacy talk this week. This is a fun article exploring how new sensors and systems are being used to monitor surfers as they train and practice.

How Private Data is Helping Cities Build Better Bike Routes by Shaun Courtney. We covered the new wave of personal data systems and tools feeding data back into public institutions a bit before. Interesting to hear that more cities are investing in understanding their citizens through the data they’re already collecting.

What Do Metrics Want? How Quantification Prescribes Social Interaction on Facebook by Benjamin Grosser. Ben is most commonly known around the QS community as the man behind the Facebook Demetricator, a tool to strip numbers from the Facebook user interface. In this article, published in Computational Culture, he lays out an interesting argument for how Facebook has created a system in which the users, “reimagine both self and friendship in quantitative terms, and situates them within a graphopticon, a self-induced audit of metricated social performance where the many watch the metrics of the many.”

Show&Tell
The Cubicle Gym by Gregory Ferenstein. Gregory was overweight, overworked, and in pain. He started a series of experiments to improve his help, productivity, and wellbeing. I enjoyed his mention of using the Quantified Mind website to track cognition. If you find his experience interesting make sure to read a previous piece where he explains what happened when he replaced coffee with exercise.

Maximizing Sleep with Plotly and Sleep Cycle by Instructables user make_it_or_leave_it. A really nice step by step process and example here of graphing an making sense of Sleep Cycle data.

ToiletMatters Toilet Matters by Chris Speed. A super interesting post on what a family was able to learn by having access to data on of all things, the amount of toilet paper left on a roll and when it was being used. Don’t forget to read all the way to end so you can get to gems like this:

“[…]the important note is that the source of this data is not only personal to me, it is also owned by me. We built the toilet roll holder and I own the data. There are very few products or smart phone apps that I can say the same about. Usually I find myself agreeing to all manner of data agreements in order to get the ‘free’ software that is on offer. The toilet roll holder is then my first experience of producing data that I own and that I have the potential to begin to trade with.“

Visualizations
e-traces-lesia-trubat-01_800 E-Traces by Lesia Trubat. A beautiful and fun project by recently graduated design student, Lesia Trubat. Using adruinos and sensors places on the shoes of dances she was able to create unique visualizations of dance movement. Be sure to watch the video here.

 

jepricer Animated Abstractions of Human Data by James E. Pricer. James is an artist working on exposing self-collected data in new and interesting ways. Click through to see a dozen videos based on different types of data. The image above is a capture from a video based on genotypes derived from a 23anMe dataset.

The Great Wave of Kanagawa by Manuel Lima. Although this is an essay I’m placing it here in the visualization section because of it’s importance for those working on the design and delivery of data visualizations. Manuel uses the Great Wave off Kanagawa as a wonderful metaphor for designing how we visually experience data.

D3 Deconstructor by UC Berkeley VisLab. A really neat tool here for extracting and repurposing the data powering at D3.js based visualization.

From the Forum
myStress
Diagnosed sleep apnea. Looking for metrics pre/post treatment
Trend Research
New Self Quantifier
Memosee

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How to Track Your Sleep: Learn from Daniel Gartenberg at QS15

DanG_SleepGraphs

It’s commonly believed that we sleep away approximately a third of our lives. Is it good sleep? Does it help us refresh and regenerate? What can we do to make our time spent in bed even better?

Join us at our upcoming QS15 Global Conference and Exposition on June 18-20 in San Francisco to learn first-hand about how to track your sleep and benefit from your sleep data.

DGWe’re excited to have our QS Washington DC meetup organizer, PhD student, and avid self-tracker, Daniel Gartenberg, sharing his deep knowledge of tracking sleep. Daniel has used multiple devices to find out what works and what helps him achieve a better night’s sleep, including the Sleep Smart Alarm Clock, Galaxy Gear watch, the Actiwatch (a research validated devices), and the Hexoskin shirt. We may even get a peek at the sleep tracking capacities of the Apple Watch.

Daniel’s Sleep Tracking session is just one of the many hands-on, up-to-date, expertly moderated sessions we’re planning for the QS15 Global Conference and Exposition. This year, QS15 is going to be two full days of self-tracking talks, demos, and in depth discussion, followed by a third day for a grand public exposition of the latest self-tracking tools. Join us at the Fort Mason Center on the San Francisco Waterfront. We’ve made some early bird tickets available for readers of the Quantified Self blog (for a limited time): Register here!

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What We Are Reading

A long one this time. Enjoy the words, numbers, and images herein.

Articles
New biometric tests invade the NBA by Pablo S. Torre and Tom Haberstroh. Data and statistics are nothing new in professional sports. They’ve even made Academy Award nominated movies based the idea that data can help a team win. Until now data on players and teams has come from analysis of practices and gameplay. This great piece opens another discussion about collecting even more personal data about how players in the NBA live their lives off the court. Recall that athletes, coaches, and owners have been talking about out of game data tracking since 2012.

Misleading With Statistics by Eric Portelance. We’ve featured these type of articles before, but the example used here by Eric is not to be missed. So many times the data visualization trumps the actual data when a designer makes editorial choices. After reading this piece you’ll think critically the next time you see a simple line chart.

Handy Tools & Apps by Ray Maker. A great resource for athletes and exercisers who use a variety of tools to capture, export, and work with the activity and workout data we’re collecting.

You are not your browser history by Jer Thorpe. If someone you didn’t know was given a record of every ad served to you in your browser, what would they say about you? Who would they think you were? Jer Thorpe actually put these questions to the test as part of his work with the Floodwatch project. Floodwatch is a very interesting tool (browser extension) that saves and visualizes the adds you see while you browse. They also have a clear privacy policy including giving you access to your data.

Show&Tell
Happiness Logging: One Year In by Jeff Kaufman. A great post here about what Jeff has learned about himself, what is means to log something like “happiness”, and the power of tagging data. After looking at his data, and a commenter’s from the r/quantifiedself subreddit, I’m wondering about the validity of 10-point scales for this type of self-tracking.

Redshit/f.lux Sleep Experiment by Gwern. Our esteemed friend and amazing experimenter is back with another analysis of his sleep data. This time he explains his findings from using a program that shifts the color temperature on his computer away from blue and towards red.

I ran a randomized experiment with a free program (Redshift) which reddens screens at night to avoid tampering with melatonin secretion and sleep from 2012-2013, measuring sleep changes with my Zeo. With 533 days of data, the main result is that Redshift causes me to go to sleep half an hour earlier but otherwise does not improve sleep quality.

Make sure to join the discussion on the forum!

Visualizations

Joost_3yr
3 Years of computing by Joost Plattel. Our good friend and Amsterdam QS co-organizer, Joost Plattel takes a look at three years of running Lifeslice.

ScheduleAbstracted_MMcD
Schedule Abstracted by Mike McDearmon.

Even a hectic schedule can have a sense of serenity with all text, labels, and interface elements removed.

LocationHistory
Location History Visualizer by Theo Platt. The data above is actually my full Location History from Google Takeout. Theo made this simple and fast mapping visualization tool. Try is out yourself!

Lifelogging Lab. No visualizations here, but if you’re a designer, visualizer, or just have some neat data then you should submit it to this sure to amazing curated exhibition.

From the Forum
The ethics of QS
Call For Papers: HCI International 2015 Los Angeles
Pebble for Fitness Tracking
QS Business Models
QS, Light, Sleep, Reaction Timing, and the Quantified Us
Are you using your data to write a reference book or tell a story?

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What We Are Reading

We’ve put together an nice list of articles for you to enjoy this weekend. As always, please get in touch if you have something you’d like us to share!

Articles
Finding Patterns in Personal Data by Kitty Ireland. Another great post from Kitty about using personal data to uncover interesting, and sometimes surprising, patterns. Some great examples in this post!

The Tale of a Fitness-Tracking Addict’s Struggles With Strava by Jeff Foss. Just because you can track, and you can get something out of it, might not mean you should. (I had a similar experience on a recent trip to Yosemite so this article was quite timely.)

Algorithmic skin: health-tracking technologies, personal analytics and the biopedagogies of digitized health and physical education by Ben Williamson. Quantified Self and self-tracking tools are not limited to only being used by conscious and willing adults. They’re also being developed for and used by a growing number of children and adolescents. What does this mean of health and fitness education, and how should we think about algorithms in the classroom and gym?

Seeing Ourselves Through Technology: How We Use Selfies, Blogs and Wearable Devices to See and Shape Ourselves by Jill Walker Rettberg. I just started this book and it appears offer some interesting perspectives on the current cultural shift toward technically mediated representation. The book includes a chapter on Quantified Self and is available for download in PDF and EPUB under a CC BY license.

Show&Tell
Why Log Your Food by Amit Jakhu. Amit started tracking his food in March (2014) and has since learned a few things about his preconceived notions about his diet, food, and what it takes to keep track of it all.

Even When I’m active, I’m sedentary by Gary Wolf. Gary and I used our recently released QS Access app to download his historical step data. Using some simple charting in Excel we found some interesting patterns related to his daily movement.

Visualizations
SleepJewel
When Do I Sleep Best by Jewel Loree. Jewel presented her sleep tracking project at a recent Seattle QS Meetup. The image above is just a small piece of a great set of visualizations of her data gathered with SleepCycle and Reporter apps.

20min
Lightbeam Visualization by Simone Roth. Interesting tool described here to track how your data and web activity is being tracked. You can check out the Firefox extension here.

Minard It’s About Time by Hunter Whitney. A nice post here about the different methods of visualizing temporal data.

Respiration Machine 0.3 (bellows) by Willem Besselink. A neat physical visualization and art project that represents breath using a Hoberman sphere.

From the Forum

There has been a lot of great discussion on the forum lately. Check out some of the newest and most interesting topics below.

QS Access App
Hypoxic – An App for Breathing Exercises with HRV Tracking
Sleep Tracking & Hacking Google Hangout
Personal Analytics Service for Software Developers
Using Facial Images to Determine BMI
The Right Tool? (tracking and plotting sleep)

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Christel De Maeyer: My Journey With Sleep Monitoring

Like many people, Christel de Maeyer felt that her sleep could be better. Presenting at our 2013 conference in Europe, Christel shares what she learned from collecting over three years of sleep data.


What did Christel do?
Christel tracked her sleep for 2 years with various devices. She tested the effects of different variables on her sleep quality, including consumption of alcohol, keeping a consistent wake time and changing her mattress.

How did she do it?
She used the Zeo to track sleep for two years, before switching over to a BodyMedia device. While making changes she monitored how her sleep data changed, as well as how she felt.

What did she learn?
Before self-tracking, Christel felt that she woke up frequently during the night, and the Zeo confirmed this. On average she woke up around 8 to 9 times. She suspected the mattress could be part of the problem. After considerable research, she replaced her mattress (to one that had a foam top), successfully reducing her wake-ups to 4 or 5.

Christel discovered that her sleep patterns looked significantly different after just two glasses of alcohol. Her REM diminishes to nearly 0% (though deep sleep seems unaffected).

Christel also found that total sleep time was less important for how she felt the next day than the combination of REM and deep sleep. Even if she only sleeps for six hours, as long as she gets at least 2 hours of combined REM/deep sleep, she feels good.

In addition to these findings and others she explores in the video above, Christel has taken her lessons and now helps others with sleeping issues. You can find more at her website.

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Kouris Kalligas: Analyzing My Weight and Sleep

Like anyone who has ever been bombarded with magazine headlines in a grocery store checkout line, Kouris Kalligas had a few assumptions about how to reduce his weight and improve his sleep. Instead of taking someone’s word for it, he looked to his own data to see if these assumptions were true. After building up months of data from his wireless scale, diet tracking application, activity tracking devices, and sleep app he spent time inputing that data into Excel to find out if there were any significant correlations. What he found out was surprising and eye-opening.

This video is a great example of our user-driven program at our Quantified Self Conferences. If you’re interest in tell your own self-tracking story, or want to hear real examples of how people use data in their lives we invite you to register for the QS15 Conference & Exposition.

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What We’re Reading

It’s a long one today, so buckle in and get ready for some great stuff!

Articles
The Quantified Self: Bringing Science into Everyday Life, One Measurement at a Time by Jessica Wilson. This piece, from the Science in Society Office at Northwestern University, explores the Quantified Self movement, with a particular focus on the local Chicago QS meetup. Always interesting to see how individuals draw distinctions between self-tracking projects and “real science.”

Diversity of Various Tech Companies By the Numbers by Nick Heer. Recently Apple released data about the diversity of their employee workforce. This marked the last major tech company to publish data about diversity. In this short post Nick takes that data and shows how it compares to data from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Interested in more than just the big six listed here? Check out this great site for more tech company diversity data (Hat tip to Mark Allen for finding that link!)

Intel Explores Wearables for Parkinson’s Research by Christina Farr, Reuters. Intel is in the news lately based on their interest in developing and using their technological prowess for qs-related activities. In this post/press release, they describe how they’re partnering with the Michael J. Fox Foundation to explore how they can use wearable devices to track and better understand patients with Parkinson’s Disease. It appears they’re also working to get their headphone heart rate tracking technology out to market.

Spying on Myself by Richard J. Anderson. I’m always interested in how people talk to themselves about self-tracking. This short essay describes the tools that Richard uses and why he continues or discontinues using them. His follow up is also a must read.

Dexcom Mac Dance by Kerri Sparling. You know we’re fascinated by the techniques and tools developed and refined by the the diabetes community. In this short post, Kerri highlights the work of Brian Bosh, who developed a Chrome extension to access and download data from Dexcom continuous glucose monitors on a Mac. (Bonus link: Listen to Chris Snider’s great podcast episode where he talks to John Costik, one of the originators of the CGM in the Cloud/Nightscout project.)

Show&Tell
The Three-Year Long Time Tracking Experiment by Lighton Phiri. Lighton is a graduate student at the University of Capetown. In 2011 he became curious about how he was spending his time. After installing a time-tracking tool on his various computers, he started gathering data. Recently, after 3 years of tracking, he downloaded and analyzed his data. Read this excellent post to find out what he learned.

Experimenting with Sleep by Gwern. One of our favorite self-experimenters is back with some more detailed analysis of his various sleep tracking experiments. Read on to see what he learned about how caffeine pills, alcohol, bedtime, and wake uptime affects his sleep.

QS Bits and Bobs by Adam Johnson. Adam gave talk at a recent QS Oxford Meetup about his lifelogging and self-tracking, his custom tools for importing data to his calendar, and what he’s learned from his experiences. Make sure to also check out the neat tool he’s developed to log events to Google Calendar.

Visualizations

NikeFibers
FuelBand Fibers by Variable. A design team was given Nike FuelBand data from seven different runners and created this interesting visualization of their daily activity.

SleepWork
I don’t Sleep That Well: A Year of Logging When I Sleep and When I’m at Work by Reddit user mvuljlst. Posting on the r/dataisbeautiful subreddit, this user tracked a year of their sleep and location data using Sleepbot and Moves. If you have similar data and are interested in exploring your own visualization the code is also available.

JawboneCity
In the City that We Love by Brian Wilt/Jawbone. The data science team at Jawbone continues to impress with their production of meaningful and interesting data visualizations based on data from UP users. In this post and corresponding visualizations they explore the daily patterns of people from around the world. Make sure to read the technical notes!

From the Forum
Export Moves Data to Day One
Understanding Patents – All your transmission data belong to us
Quantified Self, It’s Benefits
Sun Exposure and Vitamin D Levels Wearable Tracker

Want to receive the weekly What We Are Reading posts in your inbox? We’ve set up a simple newsletter just for you. Click here to subscribe.  Do you have a self-tracking story, visualization, or interesting link you want to share? Submit it now!

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Vanessa Sabino on Tracking a Year of Sleep

Vanessa Sabino was curious about how well she was sleeping. By using the Sleep as Android app, she was able to track a year of sleep data. Before she was able to dig into the data she ran into a problem with the data export format and had to write her own custom data parser to create usable CSV files. Vanessa was then able to use the data to explore her question, “When do I get the most amount of deep sleep?” In this talk, presented at the Toronto QS meetup group, Vanessa explains her process and what she learned from analyzing 340 days of sleep data.

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