Topic Archives: Conference

Kids and QS at Quantified Self Conferences: Victor Lee

Aligned with QS and learning, Victor Lee presents Quantifying with Kids at QS15 in San Francisco. As an educator, Lee spends most of his time thinking about how learning works. Lee discusses his QS project using a range of technologies (fitbit, Jawbone, Garmin) to track kids’ activities throughout their days. Lee helps the students work with their data, make visualizations and analyze their results.

Graph of the learning gains of kids working with their own data vs traditional instruction

Graph of the learning gains of kids working with their own data vs traditional instruction

We hope you can join us to share your learnings from a project, or simply be inspired at this year’s Quantified Self 2018 Conference in Portland on September 22-23. Register here.

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Kids and QS at Quantified Self Conferences: Morgan Friedman

In the spirit of our upcoming QS18 Conference that will be focused on QS and learning, we want to share some great QS projects from past conferences that incorporate our greatest learners–children.  The projects come from teachers and parents and even a student himself, presenting how they learn using QS methods. Summer is upon us and we want to highlight some of these kid-based projects that truly celebrate the learning process through both tracking and analyzing.

It is well-known that our children teach us many things in life—just imagine the learnings parents can gain from their children’s data. Morgan Friedman’s project, Tracking Baby Milestones: Surprising Results of Bringing Data to Parenting, presented at the QS15 Conference at Fort Mason, San Francisco does just this. Friedman shows the many parenting lessons gleaned from tracking and analyzing his baby’s data, even as a sleep-deprived parent. Morgan and his wife began tracking every little detail of his baby’s life right after he was born. Soon after, he built an application that sourced data from 3,000 other parents to compare his baby’s development with. By tracking and comparing baby milestones, they found interesting and important correlation. In this talk, Friedman discusses data, patterns, and surprising parenting advice they learned from tracking.

Morgan Friedman at QS15 Conference & Expo, San Francisco

Morgan Friedman at QS15 Conference & Expo, San Francisco

Morgan sharing one of his learnings that on average girls recognize themselves in a mirror 2 weeks before boys.

Morgan sharing one of his learnings that on average girls recognize themselves in a mirror 2 weeks before boys.

We hope you can join us to share your learnings from a project, or simply be inspired at this year’s Quantified Self 2018 Conference in Portland on September 22-23. Register here.

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QS18: The Quantified Self Conference. Join us in Portland!

Portland CityscapeWhat did you do? How did you do it? What did you learn?

These are the questions that inspire every Quantified Self conference. We’ve been working for many months to organize the 2018 meeting, and now we’re ready to open QS18 for public registration. The conference this year is in Portland, Oregon – we hope you’ll join us!

QS18: The Quantified Self Conference – Register

QS18 is what we call a “Carefully Curated Unconference.” We’ll have over 100 individual sessions, all of which are proposed and lead by conference attendees. We work closely with all the participants in advance, based on what we know of your projects, work and interests. The final program lineup is released a few days before the event. So please let us know what you’re working on when you register.

A warm thank you to Ziba Design in Portland, OR, whose beautiful building will be the setting of this year’s meeting. Due to the size of the venue, attendance is strictly limited to 300 people. We have a limited number of early bird tickets available for a reduced price. So please don’t delay.

 

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QS Symposium on Cardiovascular Health

Mark&Dawn

Dr. Dawn Lemanne & Dr. Mark Drangsholt at QS Public Health Symposium . Photo: Kristy Walker

We are organizing a QS symposium on cardiovascular health for scholars and researchers and participants in the QS Community. The goal of our meeting is to support new discoveries about cardiovascular health grounded in accurate self-observation and community collaboration. This one-day symposium will be held on Thursday, April 19, 2018 at the University of California, San Diego.

Our “QS-CVD symposium” is free to attend, but space is limited, so if you’d like to be there we ask you to get in touch with us and tell us something about your research, tool development, and/or the personal self-tracking projects you’re doing that are relevant to the symposium there.

Learn more about the meeting here: QS-CVD Symposium.

Read about the community driven research that has influenced our planning for the symposium here: QS Bloodtesters.

From the Symposium program statement:

We know that data collected in the ordinary course of life holds clues about some of our most pressing questions related to human health and well being. Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death globally. CVD risk is strongly influenced by many of the factors commonly tracked in the QS community, including fitness, diet, stress, and sleep. But significant barriers stand in the way of using personal and public data for understanding and improving individual cardiovascular health. Perhaps the most important of these barriers is a lack of consensus about the legitimacy of self-initiated research and self-collected data. Our symposium is designed to advance progress in this field through exposing practical and innovative projects that would otherwise remain invisible, inviting critical comment, and documenting the state of the art for a wider public.

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Thomas Blomseth Christiansen: Over-Instrumented Running

Some More Instrumentation Thomas Blomseth Christiansen

 

“When in doubt, add more instrumentation.”

Have you ever felt that some parts of your life should remain unquantified? Perceived quality of your poetry, or perhaps duration of arguments with your significant other? Until recently, I kept running in my ‘not to be quantified’ bucket. It was such a meditative alone time that I didn’t want to risk disturbing it through observation. I tracked the kilometers I ran and nothing more.  That changed at the finish line of a recent 50k, where I learned that my wearable had overestimated the race distance by over 8 k! I was pretty miffed, and I turned to this talk for inspiration.

Thomas inhabits the far end of the quantified running spectrum. His talk from QS17 is a fun watch, and the project page is here.

What did he do? He started out  disappointed by hitting the wall midway through a marathon. This is common enough, but Thomas’ response to running a painfully positive split was to code his own negative split plan generator, rubber band split-plan sticky notes to his arm, and set out to run at a concrete pace. His project evolved to include an olympic swimming coach, many new devices, a metronome – and ultimately mastery of the art of pacing.

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Mark Moschel: Blood Ketones During Regular Fasting

MarkMoschelWine-1Here’s proof that clarity and creativity are what make great data visualization. Mark’s illustrations show what he learned by combining mulitple-day fasts, ketone and glucose measurements and…wine.

He has generated several interesting personal insights, including some not yet published on: correlation of felt energy levels to blood ketone levels, the inverse relationship between ketones and glucose, and the ceiling effect of too-high ketones. I can’t find any publications on the wine-effect, so there may be a novel discovery in there as well. Check out Mark’s QS project page here.

I periodically become fascinated with ketosis, so the talk inspired me to revisit the topic of ketosis and prolonged fasting in women. The debate about the issue is intense, and there are relatively few publications that address women specifically. Have women in QS tried a similar experiment? What was your experience? We’ve started a forum post here on the topic.

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Kyrill Potapov: Tracking Productivity for Personal Growth

Eddie_KyrilPotapov“Once one of Eddie’s leaves wilts, that’s it. A record of my failures right there among all the green leaves.”

In a show&tell talk that is as sweet as it is clever, Kyrill asks how his grandchildren might one day learn about him through digital family heirlooms and offers this unique project as an example.

Kyrill recently acquired his grandfather’s shaving razor and was struck by the connection he felt through the evidence of ownership: the darkened areas, worn edges and other traces of use.

Reflecting on his own mostly computer-based work, Kyrill noted how little of a physical trail he leaves in the world. Could his time and productivity data leave a mark on anything? Does he have a physical object, like his grandfather’s razor, that is indirectly shaped by his toil, besides a dirty keyboard?

Kyrill explored this idea by connecting the time-tracking service RescueTime to a light placed in a box with a house plant that he named Eddie. When he spends time on things he finds personally fulfilling, like working on his PhD, the light turns on and the plant grows. When he’s caught up in other activities, the leaves yellow and die.

The arrangement adds a new dimension to his productivity data. Every couple of days, Kyrill opens the box to water the plant. This ritual provides an opportunity to take stock on how he has been using his time, based on the condition of the plant. Embodied in this living organism is his failures to stay on task and focus on what’s important. Distractions take on a new threat. Rather than just endangering his goals, they now threaten the health of Eddie.

Although Kyrill won’t be able to leave a houseplant to his descendants, it’s a worthwhile meditation on how different modes of presenting personal data can have a profound difference in the way it engages one’s emotions.

You can watch Kyrill’s talk at his QS Project page. You can read about how Kyrill  connected RescueTime to a lamp here.

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Jakob Eg Larsen: Tracking Sleep and Resting Heart Rate

JakobLarsenRHRdata

Jakob Eg Larsen has tracked his sleep and resting heart rate (RHR) for the past four years. His 7 minute talk is far better watched than read about: it’s a great illustration of data validation, longitudinal tracking, and data assisted self-awareness.

Briefly, by tracking his RHR over a long period of time, Jakob has developed an intuition for connections between his RHR and physiological state. He’s able to use the data to tune his self-awareness, but still keep a safety net when unexpected RHR elevations might portend a flu. To boot, the years of data across the Fitbit Blaze, Oura ring and Basis are one of the most extensive within-individual comparisons I can find anywhere of these devices.

You can watch the full video of Jakob’s talk at his QS Project page.

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Cantor Soule-Reeves: Fight For Your Right to Recess

Cantor

It rains a lot in Portland, Oregon. And if you’re 8 years old like Cantor, recess gets cancelled a lot. But unlike most 8-year-olds, Cantor is doing something about that.

By tracking his steps, he’s able to show that every cancelled recess takes about 600 steps out of his day. Compared to his average of ~15,000 steps a day, it might not sound like a lot, but Cantor and his mom Bethany hope it might be enough to change his elementary school’s policy for rainy-day restrictions.

We don’t typically see young children doing serious self-tracking, especially with such an altruistic (and downright cool) aim of fighting for more recess time. We have our fingers crossed, both for the school’s response and for seeing more projects like Cantor’s in the future. Check out Cantor’s talk at QS Project page.

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QS17 Highlight: My Scars by Ellis Bartholomeus

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Ellis Bartholomeus gave a talk at QS17 that is a definite “must watch.”

We all accumulate physical scars throughout our lives. My own history consists of scrapes from trees, kitchen burns and a misadventure with liquid nitrogen. Ellis has taken a quantitative and thoughtful look at the form and meaning of her scars. At left, is a map of decades’ worth of Ellis’ scars. In her talk, she walks through that history and the way she turned it into data, which allowed novel findings, such as, if she added the lengths of her scars, the total is over a meter.

We often spend our time trying to appear and feel unworn by our years, covering them with clothing or makeup and ignoring the memories they represent. While Ellis embraces the past, she discusses the frustration associated with the limitations imposed by her injuries. Still, she uses her scars as a visual reminder to appreciate her own history and resilience.

You may watch the entire talk at her project’s page.

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