Topic Archives: Conference

QS Access App Visualization Showcase

Two weeks ago we announced the release of the QS Access App so you could access your HealthKit data in tabular format for personal exploration, visualization, and analysis. In that short period of time, we’ve seen a good number of downloads and positive feedback.



We know from our experiences hosting in-person and online communication about personal data that seeing real-world examples of what is possible is what inspires people to engage and ask questions of their own data. With that in mind we’re excited to announce our QS Access Visualization Showcase.

We are looking to you, our amazing community of trackers, designers, and visualizers, to show use what you can do with data gathered from using the QS Access App. Make heatmaps in D3, complete analyses and visualizations in Wizard, or just make meaningful charts in Excel. If you’re visualizing your QS Access data we want to see it.

We also know that data visualization design and creation is not trivial work. To support the community and help expose the visualization work we’ll be awarding free tickets to our QS15 Global Conference & Exposition to individuals who use QS Access to create unique and interesting visualizations. We’ve earmarked two tickets (a $700 value) for outstanding work.  If you’re selected, we’ll also work with you to showcase your work at the QS15 Conference and Exposition so other community members and attendees can explore and learn from their own data.

Submit your visualizations here.

 

If you’re in the Bay Area come to our QS Meetup on November 11th at the Berkeley Skydeck. You can showcase your visualization and tell our community what you’ve learned from accessing and visualizing your data.

Example Visualizations

HealthKit is still new and the number of apps that integrate with it is growing by the day. At QS Labs we’ve done a bit of work making simple visualizations that are meaningful to us.

Steps and Sedentary Activity

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Gary has an iPhone 5s which has native step tracking. We used the QS Access app to export his hourly step totals and made these simple line graphs in Excel. You can read more about what he learned from these simple data visualizations here.

How Much Do I Run?

Ernesto is an avid runner and enjoys running along the quiet trails in Los Angeles. He was interested to see how often he actually runs and if there’s any pattern to his running. Using a well-designed D3 template he was able to make a calendar heatmatp of his running distance.

 

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Example Data

If you don’t have any HealthKit data to work with, or just want to play with some example data we’ve created a few files that you can use as examples. Download the files below from our GitHub account and make sure to read the documentation to understand where the data is coming from.  Descriptions of the data files and sources are available in our QS Access Data Examples repo on Github.

Example Data:
ER_HealthKit_DailyData
ER_HealthKit_HourlyData

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Inclusion and Diversity at QS15

Today we’re happy to announce that we’re opening up a scholarship application for the QS15 Conference and Exposition. Since our first conference in 2001 our aim has been to foster an inclusive environment, and with the help and guidance from many attendees we’ve benefited greatly from exposing ourselves to the wide range of ideas about what it means to get “personal meaning from personal data.”

Last year, thanks to the leadership of our own longtime friend and collaborator, Amelia Greenhall, we published our first anti-harassment policy for the 2013 QS Global Conference. We leaned heavily on the great work of the Ada Initiative to make sure that our event attendees were supported and protected. We were further inspired by QS Boston and QSXX Boston organizer, Maggie Delano, to implement a code of conduct in order to make sure that our meetups are a welcoming place where community members can come together and safely share and learn from each other.

Opening up this scholarship application is an continuation of these ongoing efforts to support diversity and openness. We’re taking cues from other exemplary events such as Portland’s XOXO Conference & Festival and listening to thoughtful leaders in our community. QS15 is not your typical tech-focused event, our conferences never have been. They’re special because they’re attendee-driven. The community guides the program by sharing their self-tracking experiences and facilitating discussions on a wide range of topics. It makes sense to turn our beliefs on inclusion and diversity into action by welcoming and supporting those who have typically been underrepresented in our events and the broader techno-culture. These efforts also reflect our mission to support access. We’re currently in the early stages of a new effort to encourage and communicate about the importance of personal data access (see our QS Access App here). But access doesn’t have to stop at being able to download a CSV file. Access to our community of leaders, exemplary users, toolmakers, and researchers matters too.

If you identify with a group that has been underrepresented and would like to attend the QS15 Conference and Exposition we want to hear from you. We’ve made a simple application form for you to fill out so you can tell us a little about yourself. We’ll be reviewing applications as they come in. Because the conference is attendee-drive we place an emphasis on those would like to contribute to the program. We run our conferences on a shoestring, but this year we are going to do what we can to provide both registration and travel grants in this program.

Apply for a Diversity and Inclusion Scholarship

We invite you to help support this program. When you register for the conference you’ll see a additional registration field marked “Donation.” We are grateful for your support, at any amount.

We’re experimenting with moving our comments from the blog to our QS Forum. To discuss this post we invite you to join the forum thread here

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Steve Zadig: Life in the Fast Lane

Steve Zadig is the COO of Vital Connect, but when he’s not busy with his job he’s out racing high performance vehicles. In this talk, presented at our 2013 Global Conference, Steve explains how he uses data to help him achieve his racing goals.

What did Steve do?
Steve wanted to get more information about how his body was reacting during racing. Frustrated that he was getting a lot of diagnostic data from his car and not any from himself he sought to track different biometrics to see what he could learn about what happens while he’s behind the wheel.

How did he do it?
Steve wore a Vital Connect patch to record and transmit his respiration rate, heart rate, and stress levels while he was was racing.

What did he learn?
After the race Steve was able to match the data with specific points and events during the race. He learned how something major, like spinning out of control, caused a large spike in stress, and how when he’s feeling in the zone his body responds with a lower heart and breathing rate.

“It’s about knowing. It’s about the knowledge of what’s happening with your body and how to deal with that.”

The QS15 Conference and Exposition is fast approaching. We invite you attend and give show&tell talks just like this one about your tracking and personal data experiences.

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Visualizing Our Quantified Self

At our 2013 Quantified Self Global Conference we were excited to share a variety of beautiful and insightful data visualizations from our community. In the months leading up to the conference we asked attendees to send in their own personal data visualizations along with a short description. In our 6 years of hosting Quantified Self meetups and events, as well as running this website, our forum, and social channels, we’ve seen the power of data visualization as a story telling medium. We exist in part to help people tell their stories – about the data they collect, the changes they create, and the insights and new knowledge they’re excited to share.

Today we’re sharing a few of our favorite visualizations from past conferences. The images and descriptions below represent a wide a variety of tracking experiences and techniques, and we hope to showcase eve more unique personal data projects at our upcoming QS15 Conference & Exposition.

Tracking Sleep by Anita Lillie

This is concatenation of screenshots from my sleep app. Most sleep apps don’t let you zoom out like this and still see daily/nightly detail, so I just made it myself. I like that it shows how almost-consistent I am with my sleep, and made me ask new questions about the “shape” of a night of sleep for me.



2.5 Years of My Weight by Mette Dyhrberg

I gained a lot of insights from this heat map. The most obvious weight gain was no surprise — that’s when I periodically don’t track. In any case, the big picture patterns are easily identified with a heat map. Realized looking at this heat map that the point of no return was mid-April 2012 — my data shows that was when I switched protein shakes with an egg based breakfast. I have since experimented and seen that protein shake in the morning seems to keep my blood sugar more stable and as a result my weight under control!



One Month of Blood Sugar by Doug Kanter

This is a visualization of one month of my blood sugar readings from October 2012. I see that my control was generally good, with high blood sugars happening most often around midnight (at the top of the circle).



Tracking Productivity by Nick Winter

My percentile feedback graph of my development productivity helps my motivation.



Six Months of My Life by David El Achkar

This is my life during the past six months. Each square = 15 minutes. Each column = 1 day. This picture represents 138 days or 3,000+ activities.



My Thesis Self Portrait by Sara M. Watson

Here’s a period of a few days of webcam images taken using Stan James’ LifeSlice during the final days of editing my thesis on Quantified Self uses of personal data. Serious business!



Sleep and Meaningful Work by Robby Macdonell

In an average work day, I don’t consider communication (email, instant message, etc) to be terribly meaningful work. I’d much rather be working on building software. Getting more sleep the night before increases the amount of meaningful work I’m likely to do in a day.



70 Days of Pulse by Laurie Frick

Pulse rate over 24 hours for 70 days from my Basis watch. Grey=null, blues=85

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Kouris Kalligas: Analyzing My Weight and Sleep

Like anyone who has ever been bombarded with magazine headlines in a grocery store checkout line, Kouris Kalligas had a few assumptions about how to reduce his weight and improve his sleep. Instead of taking someone’s word for it, he looked to his own data to see if these assumptions were true. After building up months of data from his wireless scale, diet tracking application, activity tracking devices, and sleep app he spent time inputing that data into Excel to find out if there were any significant correlations. What he found out was surprising and eye-opening.

This video is a great example of our user-driven program at our Quantified Self Conferences. If you’re interest in tell your own self-tracking story, or want to hear real examples of how people use data in their lives we invite you to register for the QS15 Conference & Exposition.

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What is a Quantified Self Conference?

If you’ve seen the announcement for our 2015 QS Conference & Expo and you’ve never been to a QS event before you may be asking yourself what our conferences are all about. From our very first meetup in 2008 through our six conferences and numerous events we’ve emphasized the role of the personal story and real-world experience. We do this in a variety of ways.

First, we run our conferences as a carefully curated unconference. When you register, you’re asked to tell us about the self-tracking projects you’re working on and other QS-related ideas you have. Our conference organization team goes through every registration, diving deep into personal websites, Twitter feeds, and blog posts. We love seeing individuals using self-tracking in new and different ways to find out something interesting about themselves and we work hard to surface truly unique and inspiring stories.

How does that manifest itself in the program? The core of our conference program is made up of the nearly two dozen show&tell talks where self-trackers get up and tell their story by answering our three prime questions: What did you do? How did you do it? What did you learn? It may seem simple, but these three questions provide a stable and consistent narrative to inspire you to learn and engage with your own tracking practice in new and different ways.

We’ve spent some time combing through our vast video archive to showcase some of our favorite talks from our previous conferences. We hope you find them enjoyable and they inspire you to join us on March 13-15 in San Francisco for our 2015 QS Conference & Expo. Who knows, maybe you’ll be on stage and we’ll be learning from you!

Sara Riggare on ‘How Not To Fall’
Sara Riggare is co-organizer of Quantified Self Stockholm. She is also an engineer, a PhD student and a tireless researcher of Parkinson’s disease. In this fascinating talk, Sara describes using body sensors to help her control her gait.

Vivian Ming on Tracking Her Son’s Diabetes
Vivienne Ming is an accomplished neuroscientist and entrepreneur. Two years ago her son, Felix, was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes. In this talk, presented at the 2013 Quantified Self Global Conference, Vivienne explains what they’re learning as they track and analyze his data

Chris Bartley on Understanding Chronic Fatigue
While on a research trip, Chris contracted Reiter’s Syndrome. After his recovered, something still didn’t feel right. Chris consulted his physician and started tracking his wellness along with his diet and supplement intake. What follows is an amazing story about what Chris learned when he started applying his knowledge of statistics to his own data.

Adrienne Andrew Slaughter on Tracking Carbs and Exercise
Adrienne Andrew Slaughter was testing out a new diet that included carbohydrate restriction. At the same time she was commuting to work on a bike. She started to notice feeling tired and slow during her commutes and wondered if her dietary changes had anything to do with it. Luckily, Adrienne was tracking her commutes and her diet and was able to run detailed data analysis to find out what happens when she goes carbless.

Bob Troia: Understanding My Blood Glucose
Bob Troia isn’t a diabetic and he’s not out of range, but he wanted to see if he could lower his fasting glucose levels. He started a long-term tracking experiment where he tested his blood glucose and began to explore the effects of supplementation and lifestyle factors.

Sacha Chua on Building and Using A Personal Dashboard
Sacha Chua started tracking her clothes to make sure she was varying her wardrobe on daily basis. This led he to ask, “What else can I track?” As she added time tracking, food, library books, and so much more (you can view the whole set on QuantifiedAwesome.com)

Robby Macdonnell on Tracking 8,000 Screen Hours
For the last six years Robby Macdonnell has been tracking his productivity and how he spends his time on his various computers (home and work) and even how he uses phone. Over those years he’s amassed 8,300 hours of screen time. Watch his great talk to hear what’s he learned about his work habits, productivity and how he’s come to think about time.

Sky Christopherson on Self-Tracking at the London Olympics
Sky Christopherson first shared his experience with tracking and improving his sleep in 2012. That tracking led him on a path to achieving a world record as a mastars level track cyclists. Later that year, Sky began helping other athletes us self-tracking and personal data to obtain their best performances, culminating in a surprise silver medal for the 2012 women’s olympic track cycling team, on which he served as a training advisor. In March of this year, Sky and his wife Tamara gave another QS talk at our Bay Area Meetup in which they told the wonderful story of how the 2012 Olympic team rode to their medal, a journey captured in the documentary, Personal Gold.

These are only a small sample of the amazing talks and self-tracking projects that are shared at our Quantified Self Conferences. We’d love to hear your story. Register today and let us know what you’re working on!

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Announcing QS15: The Quantified Self Conference & Exposition

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March 13-15, 2015 – San Francisco

Seven years ago, about 30 people gathered for the first Quantified Self show&tell in Pacifica, California. Today there are more than 110 independent Quantified Self groups in more than 30 countries around the world. (Our Bay Area group alone has nearly 4000 members.) Nearly everywhere you go you can find people counting their steps, recording their meals, tracking their location, and using data to learn about themselves.

We believe there is still much work ahead, but in celebration of the growth of the QS movement, and in honor of the pioneering self-trackers and toolmakers who have contributed so much to the QS community, we’ve decided to hold a very special event next year. To our regular two-day global conference we are adding a third day for a GRAND PUBLIC EXPOSITION in San Francisco’s most beautiful waterfront pavilion, where toolmakers, artists, designers, pioneering self-trackers will be sharing their amazing work with the general public.

On Friday and Saturday, March 13/14, we’ll have our QS global conference, with working sessions, show&tell talks, office hours, and face-to-face collaboration, all handcrafted out of personal interaction with registrants. And then, on Sunday March 15, we open the doors of the Herbst Festival Pavilion to the general public, so that self-trackers and toolmakers can share their projects and knowledge with everybody.

If you are a self-tracker, advanced user, designer, tech inventor, entrepreneur, journalist, scientist, health professional, or just interested in Quantified Self, please join us for a weekend of  learning, collaboration and inspiration. As always, conference registrations will sell out in advance, so please sign up right away if you intend to come.

Our small QS Labs team has been working for more than year to bring a Conference and Exposition to the San Francisco waterfront, and we couldn’t be happier to finally be able to invite you. Let us know what you think. We hope to see you there!

 REGISTER FOR QS15

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Mark Leavitt: Whipping up My Willpower

When we decide to track one thing, we sometimes find that we are indirectly tracking something else.  That is the theme of today’s talk.

When Mark Leavitt was 57, he found out that he had heart disease, a condition that runs in his family. Mark set about making some life changes. He tracked his weight while adopting a low-fat diet. His tracking showed him that he was making progress and that progress encouraged him to keep tracking. But once Mark’s weight loss stalled and then started to backslide (though he had maintained his diet) his desire to track dwindled and was then snuffed out by a major life event.

Though he was ostensibly tracking weight, this experience gave him some insight into his motivation. He began to build a mental model of his willpower. When was it strong? When was it weak? Using his background as a doctor to make assumptions on the nature of his willpower, he used the tracking of other lifestyle changes, such as movement and strength-training, to test those assumptions and better understand how to follow through on his intentions.

Watch below to see what Mark found worked for him and if you would like to see how Mark’s keeping up with his habits, you can check out his live dashboard here.

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Mark Drangsholt: Deciphering My Brain Fog

One of the benefits of long-term self-tracking is that one builds up a toolbox of investigatory methods that can be drawn upon when medical adversity hits. One year ago, when Mark Drangsholt experienced brain fog during a research retreat while on Orcas Island in the Pacific Northwest, he had to draw upon the self-tracking tools at his disposal to figure out what was behind this troubling symptom.

Watch this invaluable talk on how Mark was able to combine his self-tracking investigation with his medical treatments to significantly improve his neurocognitive condition.

Here is Mark’s description of his talk:

What did you do?
I identified that I had neurocognitive (brain) abnormalities – which decreased my memory function (less recall) – and verified it with a neuropsychologist’s extensive tests.  I tried several trials of supplements with only slight improvement.  I searched for possible causes which included being an APOE-4 gene carrier and having past bouts of atrial fibrillation.

How did you do it?
Through daily, weekly and monthly tracking of many variables including body weight, percent body fat, physical activity, Total, HDL, LDL cholesterol, depression, etc.   I created global indices of neurocognitive function and reconstructed global neurocog function using a daily schedule and electronic diary with notes, recall of days and events of decreased memory function, academic and clinical work output, etc.  I asked for a referral to a neuropsychologist and had 4 hours of comprehensive neurocog testing.   

What did you learn?
My hunch that I had developed some neurocognitive changes was verified by the neuropsychologist as “early white matter dysfunction”.  A brain MRI showed no abnormalities.  Trials of resveratrol supplements only helped slightly.   There were some waxing and waning of symptoms, worsened by lack of sleep and high negative stress while working.  A trial with a statin called, “Simvastatin” (10 mg) began to lessen the memory problems, and a dramatic improvement occurred after 2.5-3 weeks. Subsequent retesting 3 months later showed significant improvement in the category related to white matter dysfunction in the brain.  Eight months later, I am still doing well – perhaps even more improvement – in neurocog function.

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Eric Boyd: Tracking My Daily Rhythm With a Nike FuelBand

In 2013 Eric Boyd started using a Nike FuelBand to track his activity. Not satisfied with the built in reporting the mobile and web applications were delivering he decided to dive into the data by accessing the Nike developer API. By being able to access the minute-level daily data Eric was able to make sense of his daily patterns, explore abnormalities in his data, and learn a bit more about how the FuelBand calculated it’s core metrics. Watch Eric’s talk from our 2013 Quantified Self Europe Conference to hear more about Eric’s experience.

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