Topic Archives: Conference

Livestream of the 2016 Quantified Self Public Health Symposium

**Update: The event is over, but you can watch the whole thing in the video below.**

Since 2014, Quantified Self Labs has put on a one day symposium in San Diego where we bring together toolmakers and public health researchers to support new discoveries about our health and the health of our communities that are grounded in accurate self-observation.

The stream starts at 9:00 AM and the schedule can be viewed here. I hope you’ll join us. Contribute to the conversation on Twitter with the hashtag #qsph16.

Posted in QSPH | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Mark Leavitt: Daily HRV As a Measure of Health and Willpower

“The heartbeat is a treasure chest of information…”

Mark Leavitt has a unique perspective in that he is both an engineer and a physician. In his retirement, he is applying his wealth of knowledge to keeping himself healthy.

In this talk, Mark looks at how heart rate variability relates to his willpower. Does he lift more weight when his HRV is high? What happens to his eating habits when his HRV is low? And if the term “heart rate variability” is new to you, Mark gives a lucid explanation.

Also, you will get a glimpse of his amazing customized workstation with pedals to keep him active, a split keyboard on the armrests to keep his knees free and built-in copper strips for measuring HRV. Cue envy.

Posted in Conference, QS15, Videos | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Shelly Jang: Can You See That I Was Falling In Love?

jang2

 

When someone comes into your life and takes up a special place in your heart, do they also occupy a similar place in your data? Shelly used GMvault to look through 5 years of Google Chat logs to “hunt for signals that I loved my husband and not somebody else.”

She looked at whom she messages, the time of a day, and the words she uses. She was able to extract meaning from innocuous metrics like “delay in response” to show whether her or her future husband were “playing games” at the beginning of the relationship. She also found that use of the word “love” did not correspond with the object of her affections (case in point: “This cytometer needs love too.”)

If you would like to do a similar analysis of your Google Chat log, contact Shelly to get the scripts she used.

Posted in Conference, QS15, Videos | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Stephen Cartwright: 17 Years of Location Tracking

image30

“I started [tracking location] because I’m interested in all these invisible systems that we are immersed in.”

Stephen Cartwright has been tracking his latitude, longitude and elevation every hour since 1999. Even though the GPS in smartphones has made location tracking automatic, Stephen finds that he gets more reliable data from manually logging his location, of which he has almost 150,000 entries.

In this talk, Steven shows how seventeen years of location tracking has given him a wealth of data to explore in the form of three-dimensional data visualization sculptures. He has even brought some of these to QS conferences. They are amazing to behold in person.

While his visualizations show where he’s been, he says that it’s the negative space that can be more interesting, prompting the question, “Where do I need to go? What do I need to see?”

Other location tracking talks that we’ve featured include Jamie Aspinall‘s adventures in the UK, Robbie MacDonell on logging his transportation, and Alastair Tse on walking around Manhattan. We’ve also featured some great location-related visualizations from Bob Troia, Aaron Parecki, Eric Jain, and Tom McWright.  If you have some location data from Moves, we’ve also written a guide on mapping it.

Posted in Conference, QS15, Videos | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Paul LaFontaine: Using Heart Rate Variability to Analyze Stress in Conversation

Paul LaFontaine is the organizer for the Denver QS meetup and has given many fabulous talks on heart rate variability. If you are not familiar with HRV, you can think of it as the measurement of your nervous system’s reaction to a perceived threat.

“Vapor lock” is Paul’s term for that feeling when you are trying to retrieve something from memory in a conversation, but because of the stress of the situation (especially if it is with a boss), you lock up as your recall fails. To better understand this phenomenon and learn how to prevent it, Paul measured his HRV during 154 conversations with bosses and co-workers.

Because “vapor lock” is not a standard measurement, Paul shows the criteria he used to identify these moments in his data. His analysis revealed a likely cause for what locks him up, but it was not what he expected and it changed his approach to meetings and conversations at work.

If you want to watch more talks about heart rate variability, Randy Sargent showed us what his HRV looks like through a spectogram. Matt Dobson talked about using it, along with other measurements, as a way to passively detect emotions. And I used a HRV device to track my stress at work.

Posted in Conference, QS15, Videos | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Ilyse Magy: Know Thy Cycle, Know Thyself

“My luteal phase went from 10 days to 16, which is a frickin’ Quantified Self miracle.”

In this great talk, Ilyse Magy describes how tracking her menstrual cycle with the Fertility Awareness Method and Kindara worked for more than birth control. Tracking her cycle helped her understand how it affects her emotional state, and led her to find out that she had a previously unnoticed vitamin deficiency.  ”Once I started charting, I was pretty amazed by what I was learning, but also kind of mad that no one had ever told me this stuff before.”

You can discuss this show&tell talk at the QS Forum.

Posted in Conference, QS15, Videos | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Jon Cousins: Why I Weighed My Whiskers

Jon Cousins has given wonderful show&tell talks on mood tracking. Like most methods for measuring mood, his process involves a subjective assessment of his well being. But what if there was a physical measurement related to mood that doesn’t involve blood work?

Inspired by an anecdote about a man’s beard growth while working on a remote island, Jon explores whether there is a relationship between his mood and facial hair. Yes, you read that right.

Posted in Conference, QS15, Videos | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Explaining Nightscout by Lane Desborough

Today the New York Times published a fantastic story by Peter Andrey Smith about the Nightscout and OpenAPS projects: A Do-It-Yourself Revolution in Diabetes Care. People with diabetes and parents of kids with diabetes are self-tracking by necessity, and we’ve learned a lot from their talks about their projects at QS meetings and conferences. Their impact is growing. Reading Smith’s story inspired me to repost a talk by Nightscout pioneer Lane Desborough, along with links to additional people and resources that didn’t make it into the Times story.


Nightscout, which Lane describes in this wonderful talk, allows people with people with diabetes and parents of kids with diabetes the see real time data from a blood glucose monitor on a mobile device. While similar efforts are underway among manufacturers, leadership is coming from patients and caregivers.

The quality and commitment here can inspire anybody who is thinking about how QS tools fit into new forms of knowledge and cooperation. The projects Lane discusses in this talk have continued to grow and evolve. Supported by a remarkable group of activists and a technically expert community made up mainly of people with diabetes and parents of kids with diabetes, contributors to these projects have created a suite of tools that can dramatically improve self-care.

For instance, a couple of weeks ago I saw this tweet from Howard Look, founder of Tidepool:

Did you know that people with diabetes have been building their own artificial pancreas systems? Read more about Nightscout, the Open Artificial Pancreas System, and related projects at these links:

Dana Lewis on the Open Artificial Pancreas System

Background on the #OpenAPS Project

Tidepool: A platform for diabetes data and the apps that use it

Nightscout project on Facebook

#WeAreNotWaiting on Twitter

 

Posted in Conference, QSPH | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Have Faith in Ingenuity by Jose Gomez-Marquez

17918229356_96c043fb18_o

From the Quantified Self Public Health Symposium

“We have to have a fundamental faith in ingenuity.”

Jose Gomez-Marquez wants to live in a world where anybody can go to what he calls “the primary sources” and ask questions of themselves using novel forms of sensing. At the Little Device Lab at MIT, Jose and his colleagues focus on bringing the ingenuity of the maker movement to the world of health and healthcare. In projects like Maker Nurse , they focus on understanding the questions people ask, the problems they face, and how they develop homegrown DIY methods to find answers. In this talk Jose uses specific examples from a new course at MIT to explain the idea of “transparent boxes” — systems and technologies that allow individuals to be creative in their exploration of themselves through data.

Watch Jose’s video on Medium.

Posted in QSPH | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Mark Wilson: Three Years of Logging my Inbox

MarkWilsonInbox

“My inbox has become a barometer of my stress level.”

Email overwhelm is something that most people of first world means can relate to. Getting a handle on this digital deluge is a Sisyphean endeavor that is, perhaps, only endured by deluding ourselves into thinking that it is possible if only we found the right tool or adopted the right habit.

In this talk, Mark Wilson (who we’ve featured before) tells us what he learned from tracking the number and age of emails in his inbox and how that made him confront the impact that his message count has on his self-esteem.

Posted in Conference, QS15, Videos | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment