Tag Archives: visualization

Laurie Frick: Experiments in Self-tracking

As much as we talk about self-tracking being about health or fitness. . . I think it’s about identity. I think it’s about us. It’s about seeing something meaningful in who we are.

Laurie Frick is a self-tracker and visual artist. It this unique combination that has led her down a path of learning about herself while using the data she collects to inform her artistic work. What started with time and sleep tracking rapidly expanded to included other types of data. In this short talk, presented at the 2014 Quantified Self Europe Conference, Laurie explains how her past experiences have informed her new way of thinking about data, “Don’t hide. Get more.”

If you’re interested in Laurie’s artistic work I highly recommend spending some time browsing the gallery on her website.

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What We're Reading

Enjoy this week’s list!

Articles
CGM in the Cloud: Personal Preferences by Kerri Sparling. A great blog post here by Kerri who explains why it’s so important to have access to her blood sugar data. She’s part of a growing community of people with diabetes who are using different methods to broadcast their CGM data into the could.

On Minorities and Outliers: The Case for Making Big Data Small by Brooke Foucault Welles. The rush towards finding the answers in “Big Data” might lead to the continued exclusion of the women, minorities, and the “outliers” of the world. Brooke makes the case here for examining these “small datasets”  to give them the weight they deserve.

“When women and minorities are excluded as subjects of basic social science research, there is a tendency to identify majority experiences as “normal,” and discuss minority experiences in terms of how they deviate from those norms . In doing so, women, minorities, and the statistically underrepresented are problematically written into the margins of social science, discussed only in terms of their differences, or else excluded altogether.”

Here’s Looking at You: How Personal Health Information Is Being Tracked and Used [PDF] by Jane Sarashon-Kahn. In this report, from the California Healthcare Foundation, Jane lays out how our health data is being acquired and used, for commercial and public benefit. I especially liked the emphasis on privacy, or lack there of.

The Making of April Zero by Anand Sharma. Anand details his journey from starting to self-track to creating an amazing website that serves as his personal QS dashboard. One interesting bit is that his tracking activities increased dramatically after Apple’s M7 chip came out with the iPhone 5S and he noticed that his phone’s battery took much less of a hit from running apps that track his activity in the background.

Show&Tells
Tracking Upset and Recovery by Paul LaFontaine. Paul has been using the Heartmath stress monitor to help him record and understand what causes him to get upset (fall out of coherence). In this post, he details how his recovery method has helped him progress, recover, and slightly reduce the number of upsets during his working session. I recommend reading all of Paul’s great posts on this work.

Europe Honeymoon by reddit user Glorypants. This reddit user tracked his European honeymoon with the Moves app and then used our How to Map Your Moves Data post to learn how to make some great maps to share his experience.

Visualizations
Lillian_YIR
This Year in Numbers – 2014 by Lillian Karabaic. A great “year in review” post here that details the tracking Lillian has done from July 2013 to July 2014. I love the mix of hand-drawn and computer-generate visualizations that provide insight into Lillian’s sleep, diet, cycling, mood, and communication data. (Editor’s Note: Lillian sent this link via the comments on Quantifiedself.com. If you have something to share please let us know!)

HelpMeViz
HelpMeViz.com. I wanted to highlight this great website and community project as we have many great visualization and data scientists in our community. On the HelpMeViz website people submit their visualizations for feedback and assistance. I’ve had fun interacting with the growing community and have even learned a few neat tricks in the process.

TravisHodges
The Quantified Self by Travis Hodges. Travis is a portrait photographer based in London. For his newest project he sought out fifteen individuals who are using self-tracking to understand and improve themselves. I especially like the inclusion of the data visualizations coupled with the individual stories from these self-trackers.

TwitterViz
Visualizing Your Twitter Conversations by Jon Bulava. Jon, a Developer Advocate at Twitter, put together a wonderful how-to for getting started on visualizing your friend network on Twitter. (If you’re interested in using the new Twitter Analytics data to better understand your tweeting we suggest Bill Johnson’s great how-to.)

From the Forum
Data Aggregation
Smart Mirror with Health Sensors
Garmin Vivo Activity Tracker – Your Results?
Sleep Tracking for New Parents

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What We Are Reading

We’ve compiled another list of interesting personal data and Quantified Self articles, self-tracking stories, and data visualizations. Enjoy!

Articles

Experimental evidence of massive-scale emotional contagion through social networks by Adam Kramer, Jamie Guillory, and Jeffrey Hancock. Facebook engaged in a large study to see if emotional states could be transferred/changed via the emotional content of the News Feed. A lot of hubbub recently about this research article related to what it means to knowingly consent to research.

Who Owns Your Personal Data: The Incorporated Woman. Jennifer Morone has added herself to a long list of individuals making a statement against the commercialization of personal data. What started as a design assignment has morphed into a statement against others profiting and controlling personal data. (Immediately remind me of this Kickstarter project.)

Quantified Self and the Ethics of Personal Data by Ian Forrester. Ian does a great job here of exploring current conversations about the variety of ethical questions that come with creating, using, and owning personal data.

Visualizing Algorithms by Mike Bostock. Mike is the creator and steward of the d3.js data visualization library. In this fascinating post, he recounts one of his recent talks about how visualization can be used to understand how algorithms work.

“[...] algorithms are also a reminder that visualization is more than a tool for finding patterns in data. Visualization leverages the human visual system to augment human intellect: we can use it to better understand these important abstract processes, and perhaps other things, too.”

Biometric Shirt for Astronauts Gets Antarctic Tryout by Eliza Strickland. Eliza describes a “try-out” for using self-tracking technology to better understand vital signs and activity during space travel.

Show&Tell

My Solution for Quantified Self: Prompted Data Aggregation by Jonathan Cutrell. Jonathan decided to build his own simple system for self-directed data collection prompts. “While they may be simple data points, and while the questions will repeat, the concept is simple: my computer asks me a question, and tracks my answer for me.”

Quantified Splunk: Tracking My Vital Signs by David Greenwood. David describes how he uses Splunk, a data monitoring and analysis tool, to help him track and make sense of new personal health data he’s collecting. It will be interesting to see what he learns as he starts adding and exploring more of his self-tracking data.

How I Wrote 400K Words in a Year by Jaime Todd Rubin. In March of 2013, Jaime decided he was going to try and write every day. In this post he describes some of the lessons he learned through tracking his writing practice. I was particularly drawn to his methods for tracking all his writing through Google Docs.

Do you have a self-tracking story you want to share? Submit it now!

Visualizations

Withings-via-IFTTTCharting Withings Data Using IFTTT, Google Spreadsheets, and d3.js by Dan Harrington. Dan didn’t like the way Withings presented weight data in it’s visualization. So, he put together a tutorial to show how you can grab your Withings data via IFTTT, import it into a Google Spreadsheet, then visualize it using d3.js, an open-source data visualization library.

 

 

MapRunKeeper1.5 Million Walks, Runs, and Bike Rides by Mapbox and RunKeeper. The Mapbox team worked with Runkeeper to map publicly shared routes. Really interesting to zoom around the world map to see where people who use RunKeeper are exercising.

 

 

Do you have a QS data visualization you want to share? Submit it now!

From the Forum

HealthKit
Lifelogging via Calendar Application
Help Analyzing Text Files?
Breakout: Productivity Tracking

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Kiel Gilleade: Rhythmanalysis

Kiel Gilleade has been interested in measuring and visualizing physiological data for quite a while. In 2011, he presented his BodyBlogger project at the 2011 QS Europe Conference. In that talk he described what he learned from tracking and exploring a year of continuous heart rate data. This year, at the 2014 QS Europe Conference, Kiel returned to talk about a new project, Rhythmanalysis. Rhythmanalysis was a project centered on “visualising the biological rhythms of employees at different workplaces.” In this short talk, Kiel describes his experience working on this project and some of the lessons he learned along the way.

If you’re interested in learning more about this work I highly suggest you visit Kiel’s website where he has additional videos of visualizations he’s been working on that use data collected as part of this project.

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What We Are Reading

Enjoy this week’s list of articles, show&tells, and visualizations!

Articles
Strava is Just the Start: The Promise of Open Trail Data. by Mary O’Connor. Data standards might be one of the most boring topics that has a real impact on our daily interactions with data. In this short piece you’ll learn how public transit data standards that help you know when the bus or subway is arriving are influencing a new standard for public trail mapping.

A Stroke Diagnosed With a Selfie by Olga Khazan. A brief piece here tells the story of Stacey Yepes, a woman who used her phone to record the onset of her second stroke.

On Behavior Modification and Agency by Rebecca Pardo. Do our devices change our actions or do we? This nice post by Dr. Pardo is a recommend read for anyone thinking about behavior change in the context of Quantified Self apps and tools.

Making Art out of Everyday Life by Aimme Levitt. If you’re in or around Chicago this summer I highly suggest visiting the Elmhurst Art Museum for the “Lifeloggers: Chronicling the Everyday” exhibit. If you can’t make it, this article about the exhibit will have to suffice.

Visualization of Human Behavior Data: The Quantified Self [pdf] by Alessandro Marcengo and Amon Rapp. This book chapter outlines ideas and insights about self-tracking from a research standpoint. The two authors go on to also describe new methods of visualization and data management they believe could positively impact people using self-tracking tools now and in the future.

Show&Tell
The DIY Pancreas by Scott Leibrand and Dana Lewis. This isn’t a single post, but rather a long story about two people working together to use data to help learn about and take control of type 1 diabetes. You can start here to learn why it was necessary to hack a system together in the first place.

Can Heart Rate Variability be Useful in Predicting A CF Exacerbation? bib Julie Desch. This is a pretty early account of what Julie is learning by measuring her HRV, but it will be interesting to follow her story along the way!

Visualizations
visitsVisits. Visits isn’t just a neat visualization. It’s a online platform to explore your location history, trips, and what you’ve done along the way. Currently it works with OpenPaths and Google Location history data as well as geotagged Flickr photos.

 

 

 

keystrokes

My Working Pulse by Victor Pascual. Victor uses an open-source keylogger to track his computer usage and work habits. This visualization, made with Tableau, shows his keystrokes by day and per month.

 

 

 

vizcat

Data Visualization Catalogue by Severino Ribecca. If you’re interested in the many different methods of data visualization, this is a good place to start. Severino has created a nice directory here that explains many of the different common visualization methods and the tools you can use to create them. To learn more about this project you can watch his talk at the London QS meetup here.

 

 

 

From the Forum
Zeo Sleep Monitor – Data Viewer Application

Home Potassium Testing

Jawbone Up – How to Access Intra-day Data

Saga vs. Moves

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What We Are Reading

We’ve compiled quite the variety of articles and links for you. Make sure to check out the show&tell and visualization sections below for some great Quantified Self examples. Enjoy!

Articles & Posts
To lead off today’s list I’m including two great posts from attendees at our recent 2014 QS Europe Conference. You can read more attendee recaps over onour roundup post.

Ten Things I Learned at the 2014 Quantified Self Europe Conference by Bob Troia. Bob takes a look back at the conference and describes his experience.

Quantified Self and Philosophy at #QSEU14 by Kitty Ireland. We hosted over 36 breakout discussion at our recent European Conference. In this post, Kitty describes one of the “standout sessions” that she attended.

Okay, back to list!

Wearable Computers Will Transform Language by Ariel Bleicher. This is a long piece, full of excellent examples of how personal personal computing is becoming, but my favorite leads the article. Wearable computers in 1961. Who knew!

CyclePhilly hopes to record biking patterns to help plan bike lanes by Jim Smiley. A big theme of our discussions at various QS events this year has been around the social and public good the personal data can do. This project, led by Corey Acri and Code for Philly, hopes to better understand where commuters are actually riding their bikes. This also reminded me of a recent data sharing deal between Strava (a GPS activity tracking app) and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

How Much Can We Demand of Consumer Connected Health? by Joseph Kvedar. We’ve mentioned this before on both the QS blog and in the reading list, self-tracking device accuracy is a tricky concept. In this short post Dr. Kvedar describes his experiences and some results using consumer tools in a clinical setting.

In-Depth: How Patient Generated Health Data is Evolving Into one of Healthcare’s Biggest Trends by MobiHealthNews. This is a nice long piece covering many aspects of the growing role of different types of health data in healthcare. I personally enjoyed learning more about the challenge of combining patient reported data with electronic medical records.

Show&Tell
Treadmill Effect of Spaced Repetition Performance by Gwern. In this exhaustive examination, our friend Gwern decided to test whether walking on a treadmill helped his memory. Specifically he randomized if practiced his spaced repetition while walking at his treadmill desk or sitting down and then looked at his grades (flashcards remembered correctly). You’ll have to read it to see what he foun. (Make sure to check out his other experiments as well!)

My Sleep Cycle Experiment and What to Limit Before Bed by Greg Blome. This is a great breakdown of what Greg found out about what affects his sleep by tracking 150 nights of sleep with the Sleep Cycle app.

Learning Ancient Egyptian in an Hour Per Week with Beeminder by Eric Kidd. Here at QS Labs we have a soft spot for spaced repetition (See Gary Wolf’s great primer here). This post details how Eric learned how to read Egyptian hieroglyphs using spaced repetition and Beeminder.

Visualizations
OpenVis Conference. Here you’ll find 18 great presentations by leading data visualization experts. Hard to pick a favorite, but I found Andy Kirks, The Design of Nothing: Null, Zero, Blank to be fascinating.

RunkeeperBreezeBreeze Habits by Runkeeper. The data science team at Runkeeper took a look at 75,000 worldwide Breeze App users to see what countries were getting up earlier, going to sleep later, and getting the most steps. I can’t wait to see more visualizations like this from Runkeeper.

 

 

 

Tableau Quantified Self Viz Contest. We mentioned this is last week’s reading list and the contest has is now over and we get to peruse the great entries. I’m going to include some of my favorites below, but make sure to check out all of them at the link above. You can also view the winners here.

spanglerThe Life of Spangler by Russell Spangler. Russell tracked his time for the month of April and presents the results.

 

 

 

 

rundergroundRunderground by Carl Allchin. Have you ever wondered if it’s faster to run than take the tube in London? Carl has your answer.

 

 

 

 

beatingdiabetesBeating Diabetes by Andre Argenton. Andre accessed the data in his Dexcom continuous glucose monitor and visualized it alongside data from his OmniPod insulin pump.

 

 

 

From The Forum
Measuring Cognitive Perormance

How To Track Smoking

Quantified Self Reading List (books)

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Dawn Nafus on Learning by Building

As both a researcher and participant in her local Portland QS Meetup group, Dawn Nafus has been engaging in a process of understanding how people learn about their lives through personal data. As part of this work Dawn and her colleagues at Intel Research have been working on creating Intel Data Sense. In this short talk, given at the 2014 Quantified Self Europe Conference, Dawn describes what she’s learned through the process of studying the QS community and building this new sense making platform.

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What We Are Reading

Another long list of interesting stuff we’ve been reading this week. Enjoy!

Articles and Posts
Pilot at Boston’s Beth Israel Deaconess gives patients electronic access to therapists’ notes by Lena H. Sun. Should patients be able to read their therapist’s notes? A hospital in Boston is experimenting with that idea. This work was inspired by a project from our friends at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation called Open Notes.

What If Our Refrigerators Get A Little Too Smart? by Owen Thomas. Are we setting up ourselves for a algorithmic controlled future of connected systems? Owen Thomas paints a slightly disturbing picture here in just a few sentences. (If someone writes a utopian rebuttal I would love to hear it.)

Google vs. our humanity: How the emerging “Internet of Things” is turning us into robots by Evan Selinger. Another nice piece on the ever increasing role algorithms have in our lives. I found the article well researched and full of interesting examples, least of not is the delegation of works onto wedding planners. (I was also tickled to learn that the chief economist at Google is named Hal.)

The United States of Metrics by Bruce Feiler. Apparently negativity is a theme this week. In this piece the author attempts to make the case that in using data to track understand your life, you are giving up the essence of life itself:

“Big Brother isn’t our big enemy anymore. It’s Big Self. That hovering eye in the sky watching every move you make: It’s you.”

The United States of Metrics isn’t such a bad thing by Nathan Yau. A short but great rebuttal to to the perceived grouchiness in Bruce Feiler’s piece mentioned above.

Here’s how I see it: I strongly believe in going with your gut instincts. It’s led me in the right direction more often than not. But, sometimes I move in the wrong direction, or I don’t know enough about a subject and all I have is uncertainty. If there’s data there to help then all the better.

Personal data and the quantified self – things you ought to know by Vicky Sargent. This is a nice review of the book, Hacking H(app)iness, by John C. Havens, which in part details how Quantified Self and tracking can influence happiness and mental wellbeing. (Editors note: A short book review of Hacking Happiness is forthcoming in a future What We’re Reading post.)

Data Ethic Workshop. Not an article, but a call for participation at a workshop on data ethics at the International Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining. Definitely something I’ll be keeping my eye on and will post papers as they become available.

What the Right Dashboard Can Do For Your Data by Thursday Bram. A nice overview of some available data dashboard systems and how dashboards can be useful for understanding multiple streams of personal data.

Show&Tell
A Look at a Few Months of HR and HRV Measurements by Marco Altini. Marco explains how he tracked his heart rate and heart rate variability while preparing for a half marathon and what he learned after 3 months of data collection. Take the time to read through this excellent post. It is really worth your while.

100 Blocks – A ‘Quantified Self’ Random Walk Experiment by Peter Gilks. Inspired by the mathematical concept of a Random Walk, Peter set out with his wife to let chance direct a 6-hour journey in New York City. Tracking all the way.

Quantified Jewel by Jewel Loree. Jewel has been tracking her music listening with Last.fm for years. After showing her pattern of music profiles to a colleague she was inspired to start looking deeper to answer an intriguing question, “What was I listening to sadder music every couple of weeks?”

Visualizations
Tablea’s Quantified Self Viz Contest. Notice anything about a few of those Show&Tell links above? They’re using Tableau as a their visualization platform. Tableau is hosting a Quantified Self Visualization contest. If you have some tracking data and want to share a unique visualization then you enter this contest and you just might win a chance to attend their annual conference. Contest ends May 26th.

percentfeedbackPercentile Feedback by Noah Slater. This is actually a combination visualization and tracking tool. Based on the great work of our dearly missed friend, Seth Roberts, and adaptations by Nick Winter, Noah has created a nice open-source project so you can experiment with Percentile Feedback. (Watch this talk by Nick to learn how he uses Percentile Feedback for productivity.)

 

 

UjiUji Wall Clock. This arcticle and interview with Ivor Williams explains why he built a clock who’s hands move to an individual’s heart rate. You can also see a video of the clock “in motion” here.

 

 

 

SC_kineticfrequencyKinetic Frequency. I’m a big fan of Stephen Cartwright’s work around designing physical installations that feed on location data. This new work uses color and and a 10×10 grid of movable columns to “display an infinite number of topographies based on a wide variety of inputted data.”

 

 

 

From the Forum

Best Pulse Oximeter for All-Night Logging?

Physical/Blood Work?

Breakout: Aggregator platforms: Understanding data?

Where Do You Keep Your Version of MyLifeBits?

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What We Are Reading

Enjoy these links, posts, and articles from around the web.

Health Care Apps Offer Patients an Active Role by Ann Carrns. A nice overview of different DIY health apps and connected home medical devices.

Getting the most out of RescueTime for your Quantified Self projects by Robby Macdonell. If you’re using RescueTime to track your computer use and productivity there are many options for extending the built in data analysis. This great post by Robby, who spoke about tracking his productivity at our 2013 Global Conference, showcases a few different methods. If you use one to look at your own data let us know in the comments or on the forum.

Downloading Your Email Metadata by Nathan Yau. Another nice how-to post from Nathan on FlowingData.com. Email is an area of rich information and most of time that data is left in the vaults of our email providers. This tutorial provides a great instruction set for gathering that data using Python.

20 Day Stranger by Playful Systems and the Center at MIT. An interesting project that will sync self-tracking data with a stranger for 20 days. It’s not in production yet, but you can apply to be a part of their trial. I’m really intrigued by the idea of sharing anonymously with strangers and what you might be able to learn about another person.

Spurious Correlations, Quantified Self, and the Health Care System by Martin Spindler. Do steps calculated, counted, and correlated by the smart pedometers of today actually improve lives?

Meet the Godfather of Wearables by Maria Konnikova. A really nice long read biographic piece on Alex “Sandy” Pentland. Sandy is responsible for running one of the most innovating research and design labs at MIT. Chances are that if you’re reading this then you’ve interacted with some bit of technology that originated with Sandy and his students.

Show & Tell

Fixing Sleep with Low Blue Light. This simple, but fantastic explanation of how one individual moved up his waking time by reducing his exposure to blue light.

Quantified Self: Three Months Later by Adam Sigel. This is a nice post about how different apps and tools helped Adam engage with his health and learn more about his life.

Visualizations

EdwardSnowVisualizing Zero: How to Show Something with Nothing by Andy Kirk. We’ve had some great discussions at recent Bay Area QS Meetups about the meaning of missing data. This short piece has some great examples of how the absence of data can be an important part of the story.

 

 

MoodMapMood Maps by Erin Hedrington. Some beautiful quantified self artwork here by Erin.

 

 

 

 

DataCrystalsWorld Data Crystals by Scott Kildall. Scott takes data sets and turns them into 3D printed representations.

 

 

 

 

From the Forum

Indoor Air Quality Monitoring

Discreet Stress Monitoring in Real Time

Inside Tracker Review

Which Wearables Have CSV Export

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What We Are Reading

Another collection of thought-provoking items from around the web.

Articles & Posts

Plan to move from #quantified self to Qualified Self by Inga de Waard. Every now and then someone writes something that causes me to pump the brakes and really reflect on self-tracking and personal data collection. This is one of those time. Inga does a nice job here setting up her experience with self-tracking to understand her type 1 diabetes. She moves on to explore how “qualified data” might be a better source of information for personal growth, “I am more than my body, I am mind. So I want to understand more.”

The Bracelet of Neelie Kroes (in German) by Frank Schirrmacher. Can machines be trusted? Are we building and willingly wearing the handcuffs of the future by strapping tracking devices to our wrists? These questions are explored in this article. (If you’re like me you are probably wondering who Neelie Kroes is. Here’s some background info.)

Biggest Gene Sequence project to launch by Bradley J. Fikes and Gary Robbins. J. Craig Venter is at it again. Now that genome sequencing has passed the $1000 barrier he has set up a new company in order to recruit and sequence 40,000 people per year.

This Mediated Life by Christopher Butler. Another amazing piece of self-reflection spawned by the recently released Reporter App. Rather than reviewing the application, the author addresses what it means to self-track when we know we are our own observer. Do we bias our reflection and data submission when we know that each answer, each data point is being collected into a larger set? (This post reminded me of one of my favorite movie lines, “How am I not myself.” from I Heart Huckabees

The Open Collar Project. At a recent meeting I learned of this project to create an open-source dog tracking collar. Pet trackers are becoming more prevalent in the market, but the purpose of this project goes far beyond just understanding pet activity. I learned from the lead researcher, Kevin Lhoste, that they’re using this as a method to encourage and engage children in science and mathematics. Very neat stuff.

Twitch Crowdsourcing: Crowd Contributions in Short Bursts of Time [PDF] by Rajan Vaish, Keith Wyngarden, Jingshu Chen, Brandon Cheung, and Michael S. Bernstein. This research paper describes the results of a really interesting project to gather information from people using micro-transactions during the phone unlocking process. It appears that we can learn a lot from people in under 2 seconds.

The Open FDA. Not an article here, but I wanted to call attention to the new open initiative by the FDA. This new effort was spearheaded by Presidential Innovation Fellow, Sean Herron. If you’re interested in doing this type of work you can apply to be a fellow here.

Show&Tells (a selection of first person stories on self-tracking and personal data)

200 days of stats: My QS experience by Octavian Logigan. Octavian recounts the various data he’s collected including activity, sleep, email behavior, and work productivity. I really like how he clearly explains what tools he’s using.

A Year in Diabetes Data by Doug Kanter. We’ve featured Doug here on the blog before. From his amazing visualizations to his talks about his process, we’ve been consitently impressed and inspired by this work. In this post Doug recounts 2012 – “[...] the healthiest year of my life.” (Full disclosure: Doug sent me the poster version of his data and it is beautiful.)

Visualization

timkim_map
This visualization comes to us from Tim Kim, a design student based in Los Angeles.

The map shows different collections and documentations made during my cross country trip. Posts made during the trip on various social media sites are orientated and placed by the geological locations. The states are elongated by purely how I felt about the duration of going across the specific state. For example, driving through texas sucked (no offense). Different facts are layered and collaged across the map to create and express a collective, over-all image of the trip. Some quantifiable information, some quantitative information to create a psych-geolocal map.

Thumbs Up Viz A really nice website that highlights and explains the good pieces of data visualization popping up all over the web these days.

From the Forum

Tracking emotional experience
Test our a new app for sleep improvement
Measuring emotions through vital signs

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