Tag Archives: visualizations

What We Are Reading

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One quick note today before we dive into this week’s set of articles and ideas: Did you know we started a podcast? Check out our first episode here and subscribe on iTunes!

Articles

Who Owns Medical Records: 50 State Comparison by George Washington University’s Hirsh Health Law and Policy Program. You’ll never guess how many states have laws that give patients ownership rights for their medical records. Spoiler: ONE.

Want to Improve Health? Help People Use and Share Their Data by Risa Lavizzo-Mourey. Dr. Lavizzo-Mourey, president and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, shares her thoughts about how access to and sharing data can bring about a Culture of Health:

I believe that, fundamentally, data is all about helping people find new opportunities to pursue optimal health and participate in their own care. That means promoting ways to get, use, and share information about themselves easily and securely.

Technology That Prods You to Take Action, Not Just Collect Data by Natasha Singer. A nice article here that includes some great insights from our friend and community contributor, Natasha Dow Schüll. Are devices being “dumbed down” or are we when we “cede [our] free will to machine algorithms”? Only time will tell.

Can healthy people benefit from health apps? by Iltifat Husain & Des Spence. In this debate, Iltifat Husain and Des Spence discuss different types of health tools, applications, and devices being used by healthy individuals. Do they impact our health for the better? These two physicians duke it out through spoken and written word.

Excavating Old-School Self-Tracking Tools by Jamie Todd Rubin. A short but interesting thought experiment here by Jamie. What would happen if we analyzed the vast troves of “soft” data found in the diaries and journals? What could we find out about our past, our history?

Show&Tell
How We Are Measuring Happiness at Whitesmith by Daniel Flopes. Another interesting example of using the workplace team communication tool, Slack, to gauge and collect information about the emotional wellbeing of employees.

MK_musicListening
Impact of music streaming on my listening habits by Maciej Konieczny. Maciej switched to streaming music in 2013, and it completely changed how he experienced music. In this great post Maciej he describes how exploring his music listening data (from Last.fm, of course), he was able to see just how his listening habits were impacted.

Visualizations

QuantifyingAboutTown Quantified Self About Town by Changyeon Lee. This visualization is part of a project by Changyeon to map artificial light in New York City. Above you see a data visualization of artificial light data around the NYU Tisch Building

 

WeightDiet My year in calories/weight.Data exported from MyFitnesspal by reddit user qwerty2020.

Access Links

In world of health data, enemies may become friends
Why should patients have the right to a copy of their imaging data?
WHO: Share Trial Data
California Launches Initiative to Advance Precision Medicine

From the Forum

Body Analyzing Scales – the maths?
Sleep Apnea Treatments
Central repository for QS dataComparing Steps with BodyMedia FIT and Fitbit Charge HR
How to calculate the impact of activities on pain levels

 

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What We Are Reading

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Enjoy this week’s list!

Articles
Antebellum Data Journalism: Or, How Big Data Busted Abe Lincoln by Scott Klein. A fascinating look back at the history of using data in periodicals. Particular emphasis is give to the story of how Horace Greely, a newspaper editor and congressman, used data journalism techniques commonly employed today to expose issues with congressman travel reimbursement policy in 1848.

Imagining the Future of Health Data by Susannah Fox. Having followed, and participated in, the Data4Health events, all of us here at QS Labs are excited for the release of the full report next week. We’ll also be watching the live webcast. Join us!

2014 Motor Trend’s Best Driver’s Car: How We Test by Kim Reynold. I know what you’re thinking, “What is a car review article doing on this list?” Well, it turns out that Motor Trend not only tracked the vehicles in this year’s testing, but also the drivers. This short article described they methods they used to track the biological signals and facial characteristics of their test drivers to derive emotion, focus, and other data.

Why you patient partners on your research team by Holly Witteman. A brilliant essay on the experiences of a researcher, who also lives with a chronic disease, regarding including patients as part of the research design process.

“[…] these people have saved our research projects countless trips down wrong paths.”

Are We at a Tipping Point for Open Data? by Phill Jones. A fascinating post with a rich amount of information and background on where the research community is in regards to data sharing and data access, and considerations for continuing to move forward.

By The Numbers by Abby Norman. Haunting and special. A must read.

Show&Tell
Narrative Clock By Morris Villarroel. Morris is a great member of our community and the organizer of the Mardid QS Meetup group. In this post he looks back on his nearly 400,000 Narrative Clip photos and breaks down what you can learn from just looking at slices of time across many days.

Quantified Myself – The Beginning By Norbert Berencsy. Norbert takes the reader on a journey of testing and experimenting with different sleep apps. I can’t wait for more posts!

Sweet Dreams are Made of These: Wearable Tech and Extra ZZZ… by Dave Champman. Dave is using an UP24 to track his activity and now this sleep. In this short post, he explains his own sleep tracking and the benefit he gets out of seeing his friend’s an colleague’s data.

Comparing my Fitbit One and iPhone 6 by Eddie Smith. A brilliant and thorough dive into the actual differences in step counts and floor estimation from two devices over daily living and a few specific experiments. My favorite part:

”Rather than get hung up on data accuracy, I think it makes sense to focus on the main goal: move more. I’m absolutely fascinated with the fact that small computers can constantly measure my motion and give me incentive to move more by constantly informing me about my movement patterns.”

Visualizations

GordonBleu_Moves
A Year at Work. Gordon Mei visualizes his time spent at work during 2014 using the Moves app. Makes sure to click through for the full visualization.

purchase_history
Four Years of Purchases by Matt Yancey. Matt was curious how his purchasing habits changed as he moved around, from the suburbs into cities. Fascinating and easy to understand visualization.

FitbitWeather
Weathering the Winter by Fitbit. An interesting visualization of the differences within and across states for physical activity during winter months vs summer months.

Access Links
Astronaut twins study raises questions about genetic privacy
Our Data, Our Health
Study Shows People Act To Protect Privacy When Told How Often Phone Apps Share Personal Information
Data accessibility is key to a successful activity tracking system
The Heart of the Matter: I can’t access the data generated by my implanted defibrillator. That’s absurd.

From the Forum
Heart Rate Monitor for Cardiac Patient
Food allergy/intolerance tests
Want an app or device to track my hormones (esp. estrogen and progesterone)
HRV Expert by Cardiomood data export from phone to excel or some other place

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What We Are Reading

We hope you enjoy this week’s selection of links, show&tell posts, and visualizations!

Articles

Hacking Your Brain by The Economist. Increasing performance and cognitive functioning, reducing depression, improving memory – if you could use a simple tool to get all these done, would you? What if that device was delivering electrical current to your brain? That’s the promise of transcranial direct current stimulation.

Talking Next-Gen Diabetes Tools with Dexcom Leaders by Mike Hoskins. Wonderful interview here with Terry Gregg (chairman) and Kevin Sayer (CEO) of Dexcom. Particular focus is given to their reaction and ideas regarding the open source Nightscout project.

Scientists threatened by demands to share data by Victoria Schelsinger. An older article (2013) about the shift towards open data and data sharing in academic science and it’s potential impact and possible pitfalls.

”’I think the public thinks that we’re all learning from everyone else’s work. That’s not true, and furthermore, it’s not true in ways that are even worse than you might think.’” – Heather Piwowar

Changing Representation of Self-Tracking by Deborah Lupton. It’s always great to hear that Deborah has released new writing. Her thoughtful analysis about self-tracking, data as culture, and data as object is consistently fantastic. Great addition to her growing body of work here.

Why Pets Are the Future of Fitness Wearables by Annie Lowrey. An interesting take on how the rise of tracking tools for pets may impact pet owners. Reminds me of  research conducted by my old colleagues at San Diego State University: Physical activity, weight status, and neighborhood characteristics of dog walkers (Spoiler: Having a dog is associated with being more physically avtive.)

This guy is the Mark Zuckerberg of open-source genetics by Daniela Hernandez. A few weeks ago we highlighted an article by Daniela that focused on the fantastic openSNP project. She’s back with a profile of one of the founders, Bastian Greshake. (Full disclosure: I am openSNP member #610.)

Show&Tell

WinterSleep

Personal Sleep Monitors: Do They Work? by Christopher Winter. Superb experiment here to try and understand the accuracy of different sleep trackers.

What I’ve learned after 10 years of quantifying myself by Maxim Kotin. The title says is all.

Checkin distance from home.

Checkin distance from home.

A History of Checkins: Facebook Checkin Stats by Octavian Logigan. Octavian breaks down three years of his location checkin history and describes what he learned through examining seasonal trends, category breakdowns, and travel patterns.

Visualizations

FitbitEarPlugs

I love the sleep tracker, so I can quantify this kind of information! (I have a 2yo and a 5yo….) by reddit user EclecticBlue. Fun visualization here of Fitbit sleep data. Also, great comments in the thread.

LocalsTourists

Locals & Tourists by Mapbox & Eric Fischer. I could spend hours exploring this interactive map of tweet locations by “tourists” and “locals”. (Special thanks to Beau Gunderson for point out that Eric also did a similar project with geotagged Flickr photos)

HumanWinter

The Impact of Weather on Human Activity by Paul Veugen. The team at Human “1.9M activities in Boston & NYC to see the impact of weather on Human activity.” Make sure to click through for the full visualization.

Access Links
FCC & FDA moving connected health forward by establishing wireless medical test beds
Nike+ Running Expand Global Partnerships
Will Our Fitness Data Be Used Against Us?
As the “quantified self” industry explodes, who will control the data — us or them?

From the Forum
Quantified Chess
Monitoring Daily Emotions
Harmony Mood Tracker
General DIY metering of fitness (“ergo test”?)
Differences between ZEO devices?

This Week on QuantifiedSelf.com
Gordon Bell: Every Beat of My Heart
QS15 Conference Preview: Stephen Cartwright on 17 Years of Location Tracking
What’s in My Gut

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What We Are Reading

We hope you enjoy this week’s What We’re Reading list!

Articles
The Wow of Wearables by Joseph Kvedar. An excellent post here in the wake of the “Smartphones vs. Wearables” hype in the past weeks. Favorite part:

“I’d have to say that reports of the death of wearables have been greatly exaggerated. The power of sensor-generated data in personal health and chronic illness management is simply too powerful to ignore.”

Survival of the Fittest: Health Care Accelerators Evolve Toward Specialization by Lisa Suennen. If you’re at all interested in the recent surge in health and healthcare focused accelerators this is for you. Excellent reporting. (Thanks for sharing Maarten!)

Your Brain Is Primed To Reach False Conclusions by Christie Aschwanden. Fascinating piece here about the nature of the “illusion of causality.”

A Few Throughs About Patient Health Data by Emil Chiauzzi. Emil, Research Director at PatientsLikeMe, lays out four point to consider when thinking about how to best use and grow self-collected patient data.

Having Parkinson’s since I was 13 has made me an expert in self-care by Sara Riggare.

I am the only person with the whole picture. To me, self-care is everything I do to stay as healthy as possible with a disease that is a difficult life companion. It entails everything from making sure I take my medication in the optimal way, to eating healthily, getting enough sleep, to making sure I stay physically active. I also make an effort to learn as much as I can about my condition; my neurologist says that I know more about Parkinson’s research than he does. I don’t find that odd, since he needs to try to stay on top of research in probably hundreds of neurological diseases, whereas I focus on just one.

From Bathroom to Healthroom: How Magical Technology will Revolutionize Human Health by Juhan Sonin. A beautifully written and illustrated essay on the design of our  personal healthcare future.

Show&Tell
Experimenting with sprints at the end of exercise routines by Gustavo M. Gustavo is a person with type 1 diabetes. After reading that post-exercise high intensity exertion might have an effect on blood glucose he put it to the test.

On Using RescueTime to Monitor Activity and Increase Productivity by Tamara Hala. Tamara walks us through the last three years of her RescueTime data and how she used that information to understand her work and productivity.

How Do You Find Time to Write? by Jamie Todd Rubin. Jamie has been writing for 576 consecutive days. How does he do it? A mixture of data and insight of course!

Visualizations
ILoveYouMaps Say “I Love You” With Mapping by Daniel Rosner. Wonderful to see CHI papers ending up on Medium. This seems like a fun self-tracking/art project.

ShannonConnors_4yearsfood Cleaning up and visualizing my food log data with JMP 12 by Shannon Conners. Once again, Shannon displays a wonderful ability to wow us with her data analysis and visualization. Above is four years of food tracking data!


Two Trains: Sonification of Income Inequality on the NYC Subway by Brian Foo. Brian created this data-driven musical composition based on income data from neighborhoods the border the 2 train. Beautiful work.

Access Links
Walgreens adds PatientsLikeMe data on medication side effects
How Open Data Can Reveal—And Correct—The Faults In Our Health System
Big Data is our Generation’s Civil Rights Issue, and We Don’t Know It.

From the Forum
Creating Scales for Quantifying Action
Sharing Anonymized Data

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What We Are Reading

Enjoy this week’s list!

Articles
Would You Share Private Data for the Good of City Planning? by Henry Grabar. The use of personal, and typically private, data for municipal planning and research is becoming more common. Strava, Uber, and other companies are passing along their user data to government bodies interested in understanding their constituents. In this article, past projects are described and new ideas are put forth about this growing trend.

The social network for people who want to upload their DNA to the Internet by Daniela Hernandez. A wonderful piece of journalism on the growing OpenSNP  platform for open user-donated genetic data. Take some time and read the whole thing. (Full disclosure: My 23&Me data is available on OpenSNP.org.)

What Cognition-as-a-Service should mean? by Debidatta Dwibedi. The promise of fitness trackers for many is that the use of them will improve one’s fitness. Dwibedi expresses the desire for a tool to make one wiser by helping the user avoid logical fallacies. There are tools that can help, like spaced repetition.

Connected Car: Quantified Self becomes Quantified Car by Melanie Swan.

Sensors sensors everywhere
Near and far
On your wrist
In your home
And in your car.

What On Kawara’s Analog Wisdom at the Guggenheim Has to Offer a Digital World by Ben Davis. A fantastic peek into “On Kawara: Silence” a recently opened retrospective hosted at the Guggenheim.

He was making art about the “quantified self”—the contemporary self-improvement craze for tracking and charting one’s personal data—not just before the fitbit, but before the handheld calculator.

What My Hearing Aid Taught Me About the Future of Wearables by Ryan Budish. A great article here about how to think about possible ways our technology with change and shape the world around us. Special consideration is given to our ever evolving relationship with the tools of wearable computing.

Show&Tell
I tried to quantify my sex life—and I am appalled (NSFW language) by Miles Klee. I went back and forth whether to include this here, but in the end I think it’s important to expose tracking of all types.

How I audited my daily media habits and improved the way I read by Lydia Laurenson. Lydia was concerned with the amount of bad content she was reading on the web.For a month, she rated the articles she read according to a 5-point scale with categories like “I’m actually angry I clicked this link” and “Wow, this is really cool or useful. I’m glad I saw this.” With these ratings, she was able to see which publications produced good contents, and which outlets gave her recommendations worth her time. You can check out her (empty) tracking spreadsheet here.

DanBrown_Dinners
The Quantified Chef by Dan Brown. Dan doesn’t fancy himself a self-tracker, but was interested in understanding his cooking habits as the main dinner cook for his family. Some interesting finds and thoughts about what it means to collect data on yourself.

MorrisV_Eventsjpg
Using a Log Book and Excel To Assess Time Use by Morris Villarroel. Morris spoke about how he uses journals to track his life at our 2014 QS Europe Conference. In this post, he explains how he transfers hand-written data into Excel for more in-depth analysis.

Visualizations

SidLee
Sid Lee Dashboard. Sid Lee, a creative agency, outfitted it’s Paris office with multiple sensors and data gathering systems powered by Arduinos to feed a beautiful real-time data dashboard. Make sure to click through for the interactive site and watch their short video.

TylerBaird
Two Thousand And Fourteen by Tyler Baird. A sentence or two cannot do this amazing work justice. Click, read, and take in the 8,760 hours of Tyler’s tracked life.

Access Links
The BMJ Today: Patient Centered Care
Health Data Exploration Project Announces Agile Research Project Awards
FDA makes official its hands-off approach to regulating health apps and medical software
Small thoughts on large cohorts
Selling your right of privacy at $5 a pop

From the Forum
Continuous HRV monitoring
New Member
Separation of cloud vs local storage?

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What We Are Reading

Another batch of links, examples, and visualizations from our QS community and around the web. Enjoy!

Articles

The phone is a gateway drug to health: what MyFitnessPal knows, and what Under Armour gets by Jane Sarasohn-Kahn. There has been a lot of talk this week about Under Armour’s acquisition of the self-tracking app companies Endomondo and MyFitnessPal. Having read through many reactions, I thought this short post by Jane was one of the best.

The Electronic Health Record: Are we the tools of our tools? [PDF] by K. Patrick Ober and William B. Applegate. This article, written for The Pharos, a quarterly journal covering nontechnical medical subjects, is a very interesting peak into how some physicians are thinking about how they practice medicine in the era of the EHR. The authors make the case that the “EHR in the exam room” is not only degrading the patient-doctor relationship, but may be contributing to a growing lack of understanding and a reduction in the holistic view of patient care.

Introducing the #OpenAPS project by Dana Lewis and Scott Leibrand. Dana and Scott, pioneers in the open medical device data and #WeAreNotWaiting movement, have done it again. Building on their experience with testing an using an Artificial Pancreas System (APS) they’ve decide to release an open reference design for an “overnight closed loop APS system.”

We believe that we can make safe and effective APS technology available more quickly, to more people, rather than just waiting for current APS efforts to complete clinical trials and be FDA-approved and commercialized through traditional processes. And in the process, we believe we can engage the untapped potential of dozens or possibly hundreds of patient innovators and independent researchers and also make APS technology available to hundreds or thousands of people willing to participate as subjects in clinical trials.

Ringly’s Destiny Revealed by Robin Sloan. Too often, the narrative around the impending device-creep, which is invading every aspect of our lived experience, settles into a “look at  how terrible we’re becoming as humans.” I really liked how Robin Sloan spun the idea of networked devices into something that becomes a fun enjoyable hacked experience.

How Data Will Help Me Keep My Resolution by Emmy Ganos. Emmy, who is a program associate at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, recently attended a few “Data for Health” events and wrote up her thoughts. It was nice to see her expose some ideas around public/communal data and it’s impact on health as well as a this gem from our own Gary Wolf:

In San Francisco, I was surprised to hear Gary Wolf, the leader of the Quantified Self movement, passionately challenge the idea that historically disempowered groups are less capable of analyzing and understanding data about themselves. He shared the provocative point that we too often underestimate people’s intelligence, and think that we have to interpret data FOR people. Wolf’s point is that everyone deserves access to data about themselves, in whatever format it is available.

Quantified Man by Jedd Cole. A nice piece of of short fiction here. To say more would be to spoil it. (Side note: If you run across other QS-themed works of fiction please do send them in. We love reading them.)

Show&Tell

Using tools to analyze my uBiome results by Richard Sprague. Richard is a member of our great QS Seattle meetup group and recently gave a talk (video coming soon!) about analyzing and understanding his uBiome micorbiota data. In this post he walks us through analyzing his data using R. He also has another great post for analyzing the data in Excel if you’re so inclined.

Visualizations

TobiLehman_standing_histogram
Standing Desk Histogram by Tobi Lehman. Tobi has a standing desk and wanted to track how much he was actually standing. He wrote a simple script to allow him to track the state of his desk and found that he typically stands for less than an hour at a time.

ChristopherPenn_BasisWatson
Marketing Analytics Tools for Non-Marketing Uses by Christopher Penn. Don’t let the title fool you, this is a great Quantified Self post. Christopher accessed his data from his Basis watch, visualized it, and then fed it into IBM’s Watson to see what was actually influencing calorie expenditure.

Music_Qlik
Making Qlik sense of the music that you play by Patrick Tehubijuluw. A nice visualization here of Patrick’s music listening history. Make sure to click through to see how you can make this same visualization.

Access Links
Smart Ways to Manage Health Need Smart Regulation
HHS Changes Incentivize Value Driven Care, But What About Device Interoperability?
BYOD – Bring your own Data. Self-Tracking for Medical Practice and Research
Big Data: Seizing Opportunities, Preserving Values (White House Report, PDF)
Patient-Generated Data Fuels Population Health Management
ONC unveils Interoperability Roadmap for public comment
Medical researchers and health care providers must consider moral as well as legal questions on data use, says bioethics body

From the Forum
Basis Peak
QS for Down Syndrome children
Diagnosed sleep apnea, looking for metrics pre/post treatment
HRV app APIs
Separation of cloud vs local storage?

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What We Are Reading

Below you’ll find this week’s selection of interesting bits and pieces from around the web. Enjoy!

Articles
Open Books: The E-Reader Reads You by Rob Horning. A fantastic essay about the nature of delight and discovery, and how that may (is) changing due to data collected from e-readers. For those interested in books and data this article By Buzzfeed’s Joseph Bernstein is also an interesting read.

Flashing lights in the quantified self-city-nation by Matthew W. Wilson. Quantified Self, smart cities, and Kanye West quotes – this commentary in the Regional Studies, Regional Science journal has it all. Read closely, especially the final paragraph, which gives space to think about the role the institutions and companies that provide cities with the means to “be smart” have in our in social and urban spaces.

Most Wearable Technology Has Been a Commercial Failure, Says Historian by Madeleine Monson-Rosen. This is a interesting book review for Susan Elizabeth Ryan’s Garments of Paradise which had me thinking about the nature of wearables, customization, and expression.

‘The Cloud’ and Other Dangerous Metaphors by Tim Hwang and Karen Levy. This was mentioned so many times over the last few days by so many smart friends and colleagues that I had to set aside time to read it. It was time well spent. The authors make the case that how we talk about data (personal, public, mechanical, and bioligical) is tied to the metaphors we use, and how those metaphors can either help or hinder the broader ethical and cultural questions we find ourselves grappling with.

Why the Internet Should Be a Public Resource by Philip N. Howard. This isn’t the first, nor will it be the last, argument for changing the way we think about and regulate the Internet. Worth reading the whole things, but in case you don’t consider this point:

And then we might even imagine an internet of things as a public resource that donates data flows, processing time, and bandwidth to non-profits, churches, civic groups, public health experts, academics, and communities in need.

Computers Are Learning How To Treat Illnesses By Playing Poker And Atari by Oliver Roeder. How does research into algorithms and AI intended for winning poker games morph into something that can optimize insulin treatment? An interesting exploration on the background and future implications of computers that can learn how to play games.

Data Stories #45 With Nicholas Felton. by Enrico Bertini and Moritz Stefaner. In this episode of the great Data Stories podcast Nicholas Felton talks about his background, his interest in typography, and what led him to start producing personal annual reports. Super fun to listen to them geek out about the tools Nicholas uses to track himself.

Increasingly, people are tracking their every move by Mark Mann. A great peak into some of our QS Toronto community members and how they use self-tracking.

Quantified Existentialism by Ernesto Ramirez. I’m putting this last here because it feels a bit self-congratulatory. Earlier this week I took some time to examine how common it is for people to express their relationship with what counts when they use self-tracking tools. It was a fun exercise.

Show&Tell
Insights From User Generated Heart Rate Variability Data by Marco Altini. While not a personal show&tell (however, I’m sure his data is in there somewhere), this great post details what Marco was able to learn about HRV based on 230 users and 13,758 recordings of HRV.

Quantify This Thursday: No Coding Required by Kerri MacKay. A bit different post here, more of a how-to, but I found it really compelling the lengths Kerri went to get get her Fitbit data to show up on he Pebble watch. I was especially drawn to her explanation of why this method is important to her:

The reality is, getting nudges every time I look at the clock or dismiss a text notification on my Pebble (via my step count) is yet another way to make the wearing-a-wearable less passive and the data meaningful.

Correlating Weight with Blood Pressure by Sam. A short and simple post detailing how Sam used Zenobase and his iHealth devices to see how weight loss was associated with his blood pressure.

Visualizations
WithingHolidays
The Effect of End of Year Festivities on Health Habits by Withings. The above is just one of four great visualizations from Withings exploring how the holidays affect how users sleep, move, and weight themselves. Unsurprisingly people are less likely to weight themselves on Christmas day (I looked at my data, I am among those non-weighers).

SimonData
Simon Buechi: In Pure Data by Simon Buechi. A simple, elegant dashboard intended to represent himself to the world.

MatYancy_Coding
Grad School Coding Analysis by Matt Yancey. The above is just a preview of two fantastic visualizations that summarize the coding Matt did while enrolled in the Northewestern Masters of Analytics program.

Fitbit_NewYears_Steps
News Year’s Eve Celebration in Steps by Lenna K./Fitbit. A fun visualization describing differences in how people in different age groups moved while celebrating the new year.

From The Forum
How do I visualize information quickly? (mobile app)
Monitoring Daily Emotions
Best Heartrate Monitor that syncs with Withings Ecosystem
Is the BodyMedia Fit still alive?
Capture Online Activities (and More) into Day One Journal Software (Mac/iOS)

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What We Are Reading

We hope you enjoy this week’s list!

Articles
The Global Open Data Index by The Open Knowledge Foundation. This isn’t an article, but rather an really nice portal to explore open data sets from around the world.

Eight things we learned about HealthKit from Duke, Oschner by Jonah Comstock. An interesting piece here detailing how two large healthcare systems are using Apple’s Healthkit.

Connected Health: Improving Patients’ Engagement and Activation for Cancer-Related Health Outcomes by the President’s Cancer Panel. Very short publication here that outlines how the President’s Cancer Panel is thinking about new changes in the health system and health technology.

Deep Neural Networks are Easily Fooled: High Confidence Predictions for Unrecognizable Images by Anh Nguyen, Jason Yosinksi, and Jeff Clune. This in not a typical entry into our weekly What We’re Reading as it doesn’t appear to be directly related to self-tracking or Quantified Self. However, I found it fascinating and a great reminder that algorithms are not infallible.

Show&Tell
interstellar-hr-hrv-gsr-1024x635
Visualizing HR, HRV, and GSR While Watching ‘Interstellar’ by Bob Troia. Inspired by a Reddit user who tracked his HR while viewing Interstellar, Bob Troia set out explore his full physiological response by tracking heart rate, heart rate variability, and galvanic skin response. Some great data in here!

Visualizations
StressSnail
Stress Snail by Pavel Zakharov. Pavel uploaded this unique visualization to our QS Forum earlier this week. This visualization represents his heart rate, activity, and stress during a particularly stressful day when he was completing a driving test. If you have ideas or thoughts on the visualization make sure to share them in our forum!

From the Forum
Get feedback and advice back
Basis Peak
Multi-API services for health/fitness data
Mobile Health and Fitness Apps Privacy Study

This Week on QuantifiedSelf.com
Greg Schwartz: Quantified Dating
David Joerg: Building My Personal Operating System

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What We Are Reading

Articles
LifeLogging: Personal Big Data by Cathal Gurrin, Alan Smeaton, and Aiden Doherty. A wonderful overview of the field of lifelogging. Special attention is given to how information retrieval plays a role in how we can understand and use our lifelogs.

What happens when patients know more than their doctors? Experiences of health interactions after diabetes patient education: a qualitative patient-led study by Rosamund Snow, Charlottle Humphrey, and Jane Sandall. In this qualitative study, the authors engaged with 21 patients with type 1 diabetes who had developed expertise about their condition. Some interesting findings about how healthcare providers may be uncomfortable with patient who understand themselves and their condition. (Thanks to Sara Riggare for sharing this article with us!)

Internet of You: Users Become Part of the City-as-a-System by Tracy Huddleson. An good look into how wearables and personal technology might have an impact on the public infrastructure, institutions, and spaces.

Welcome to Dataland by Ian Bogost. Not sure how I missed this one piece from late July, but glad I stumbled across it this week. Ian Bogost takes a tour through the actual and imagine implications of the Disney Magic Band. I especially enjoyed the historical context describing the history of futurism at Disney.

Show&Tell
Gary Wolf on Cool Tools Show #15. QS co-founder, Gary Wolf, speaks with Mark Frauenfelder and Kevin Kelly on the Cool Tools Podcast about his favorite self-tracking tools and what he’s learned from using them.

My Life Analysis Spreadsheet by Reddit user batting_1000. A really interesting example of using Excel to track various aspects of daily life. Make sure to click through for the example screen shots.

Visualizations
BasisInterstellarMy heart rate during Interstellar (via Basis Peak) by Reddit user javaski. An nice use of the BasisRetreiver tool to download and analyze heart rate data from the new Basis Peak device.

Seasonal-compliance1-1024x576Activity Time vs. Device Wear Time by Shannon Conners. Shannon plotted her actual wear time using the BodyMedia Fit against the activity data to show that low activity numbers are probably caused by hotter summer months when wearing the armband caused unwanted tan lines.

“If I had not explored my activity and usage data first to remind me of this usage pattern, I could have created any number of plausible explanations for why my activity levels were so much lower during the hot North Carolina summer months.”

From the Forum
Wearable for Stress – Olive
Necklace worn fitness trackers?
MoodTraces App
New Heart Rate Variability and Coherence Papers
Artistic Apps

This Week on QuantifiedSelf.com
Ben Finn: Improving My Sleep
Nan Shellabarger: 26 Years of Weight Tracking

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What We Are Reading

We hope you enjoy this week’s list of articles, posts, show&tell descriptions, and visualizations!

Articles
I’m Terrified of My New TV: Why I’m Scared to Turn This Thing On — And You’d Be, Too by Michael Price. Michael, a lawyer at the Brennan Center for Justice at the NYU School of Law, describes his experiences with his new “smart” TV. More sensors means more records being stored somewhere you might not have access to. Especially interesting when your device picks up every word you say:

“But the service comes with a rather ominous warning: ‘Please be aware that if your spoken words include personal or other sensitive information, that information will be among the data captured and transmitted to a third party.’ Got that? Don’t say personal or sensitive stuff in front of the TV.”

Public Perceptions of Privacy and Security in the Post-Snowden Era by Mary Madden. A great report from the Pew Research Internet Project. I don’t want to give away any of the juicy stats so head over and read the executive summary.

This Is What Happens When Scientists Go Surfing by Nate Hoppes. It’s not all privacy talk this week. This is a fun article exploring how new sensors and systems are being used to monitor surfers as they train and practice.

How Private Data is Helping Cities Build Better Bike Routes by Shaun Courtney. We covered the new wave of personal data systems and tools feeding data back into public institutions a bit before. Interesting to hear that more cities are investing in understanding their citizens through the data they’re already collecting.

What Do Metrics Want? How Quantification Prescribes Social Interaction on Facebook by Benjamin Grosser. Ben is most commonly known around the QS community as the man behind the Facebook Demetricator, a tool to strip numbers from the Facebook user interface. In this article, published in Computational Culture, he lays out an interesting argument for how Facebook has created a system in which the users, “reimagine both self and friendship in quantitative terms, and situates them within a graphopticon, a self-induced audit of metricated social performance where the many watch the metrics of the many.”

Show&Tell
The Cubicle Gym by Gregory Ferenstein. Gregory was overweight, overworked, and in pain. He started a series of experiments to improve his help, productivity, and wellbeing. I enjoyed his mention of using the Quantified Mind website to track cognition. If you find his experience interesting make sure to read a previous piece where he explains what happened when he replaced coffee with exercise.

Maximizing Sleep with Plotly and Sleep Cycle by Instructables user make_it_or_leave_it. A really nice step by step process and example here of graphing an making sense of Sleep Cycle data.

ToiletMatters Toilet Matters by Chris Speed. A super interesting post on what a family was able to learn by having access to data on of all things, the amount of toilet paper left on a roll and when it was being used. Don’t forget to read all the way to end so you can get to gems like this:

“[…]the important note is that the source of this data is not only personal to me, it is also owned by me. We built the toilet roll holder and I own the data. There are very few products or smart phone apps that I can say the same about. Usually I find myself agreeing to all manner of data agreements in order to get the ‘free’ software that is on offer. The toilet roll holder is then my first experience of producing data that I own and that I have the potential to begin to trade with.“

Visualizations
e-traces-lesia-trubat-01_800 E-Traces by Lesia Trubat. A beautiful and fun project by recently graduated design student, Lesia Trubat. Using adruinos and sensors places on the shoes of dances she was able to create unique visualizations of dance movement. Be sure to watch the video here.

 

jepricer Animated Abstractions of Human Data by James E. Pricer. James is an artist working on exposing self-collected data in new and interesting ways. Click through to see a dozen videos based on different types of data. The image above is a capture from a video based on genotypes derived from a 23anMe dataset.

The Great Wave of Kanagawa by Manuel Lima. Although this is an essay I’m placing it here in the visualization section because of it’s importance for those working on the design and delivery of data visualizations. Manuel uses the Great Wave off Kanagawa as a wonderful metaphor for designing how we visually experience data.

D3 Deconstructor by UC Berkeley VisLab. A really neat tool here for extracting and repurposing the data powering at D3.js based visualization.

From the Forum
myStress
Diagnosed sleep apnea. Looking for metrics pre/post treatment
Trend Research
New Self Quantifier
Memosee

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