Search Results for: sleep

David Joerg: Building My Personal Operating System

David Joerg is a software developer in New York City and had some interest in personal data. Inspired by attending his first QS meetup in late 2013, he decided to take a deeper dive into the data he was collecting, add some new systems, and see if he could build something to help him better understand himself. What he ended up building was his own data dashboard, a personal operating system, that allowed him to see how he was doing across the various metrics he was interested in including, sleep, exercise, weight, unread emails, and more. In this talk, presented at the New York QS meetup group, David explains his process and what he learned from developing and using this system.

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Tracking the Recovery Process: Learn from Maggie Delano at QS15

Join us at our upcoming QS15 Global Conference and Exposition on June 18-20 in San Francisco to learn how to use self-tracking tools to aid in recovery and get back into a productive lifestyle without overdoing it.

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Maggie Delano was diagosed with Post Concussion Syndrome (PCS) after hitting her head over Labor Day Weekend. To recover, she had to give her brain a break from anything too cognitively stimulating, such as using screens, reading, intense physical exercise, and loud music. Maggie was able to return to work after several weeks off. She has developed strategies that balance getting work done with giving her brain a rest and preventing burnout. She’s been using apps such as Awareness to keep her mindful of how much time she’s spending on her computer, HabitRPG to slowly build back up her prior habits and self-tracking, and Beddit to help figure out what allows her to sleep best.

maggied_beddit

Maggie’s session is just one of the many hands-on, up-to-date, expertly moderated sessions we’re planning for the QS15 Global Conference and Exposition. This year, QS15 is going to be two full days of self-tracking talks, demos, and in depth discussion, followed by a third day for a grand public exposition of the latest self-tracking tools. Join us at the Fort Mason Center on the San Francisco Waterfront. We’ve made some early bird tickets available for readers of the Quantified Self blog (for a limited time): Register here!

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What We Are Reading

Articles
LifeLogging: Personal Big Data by Cathal Gurrin, Alan Smeaton, and Aiden Doherty. A wonderful overview of the field of lifelogging. Special attention is given to how information retrieval plays a role in how we can understand and use our lifelogs.

What happens when patients know more than their doctors? Experiences of health interactions after diabetes patient education: a qualitative patient-led study by Rosamund Snow, Charlottle Humphrey, and Jane Sandall. In this qualitative study, the authors engaged with 21 patients with type 1 diabetes who had developed expertise about their condition. Some interesting findings about how healthcare providers may be uncomfortable with patient who understand themselves and their condition. (Thanks to Sara Riggare for sharing this article with us!)

Internet of You: Users Become Part of the City-as-a-System by Tracy Huddleson. An good look into how wearables and personal technology might have an impact on the public infrastructure, institutions, and spaces.

Welcome to Dataland by Ian Bogost. Not sure how I missed this one piece from late July, but glad I stumbled across it this week. Ian Bogost takes a tour through the actual and imagine implications of the Disney Magic Band. I especially enjoyed the historical context describing the history of futurism at Disney.

Show&Tell
Gary Wolf on Cool Tools Show #15. QS co-founder, Gary Wolf, speaks with Mark Frauenfelder and Kevin Kelly on the Cool Tools Podcast about his favorite self-tracking tools and what he’s learned from using them.

My Life Analysis Spreadsheet by Reddit user batting_1000. A really interesting example of using Excel to track various aspects of daily life. Make sure to click through for the example screen shots.

Visualizations
BasisInterstellarMy heart rate during Interstellar (via Basis Peak) by Reddit user javaski. An nice use of the BasisRetreiver tool to download and analyze heart rate data from the new Basis Peak device.

Seasonal-compliance1-1024x576Activity Time vs. Device Wear Time by Shannon Conners. Shannon plotted her actual wear time using the BodyMedia Fit against the activity data to show that low activity numbers are probably caused by hotter summer months when wearing the armband caused unwanted tan lines.

“If I had not explored my activity and usage data first to remind me of this usage pattern, I could have created any number of plausible explanations for why my activity levels were so much lower during the hot North Carolina summer months.”

From the Forum
Wearable for Stress – Olive
Necklace worn fitness trackers?
MoodTraces App
New Heart Rate Variability and Coherence Papers
Artistic Apps

This Week on QuantifiedSelf.com
Ben Finn: Improving My Sleep
Nan Shellabarger: 26 Years of Weight Tracking

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Ben Finn: Improving My Sleep

Benn Finn has been battling issues with his sleep ever since he was a teenager. His sleep was suffering from the usual problems we’ve all faced: taking too long to get to sleep, waking up too often, waking up late, and being tired during the day. He made plan to fix his issues by researching what affects sleep and then experimenting to find out what worked for him. For four months he tracked his sleep using Sleep Cycle along with 21 factors that he thought might affect his sleep. He also created a “sleep quality” score based on 5 different data points, including data from the Sleep Cycle app. In this talk, presented at the London QS meetup group, Ben describes his experiments, what he learned from analyzing his data, and how he finally ended up fixing his sleep issues. (Special thank you to Ken Snyder for his valuable work documenting the talks at QS London.)

BenFinn_Sleep
Slides are also available here.

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What We Are Reading

Have a great time exploring these links, posts, and visualizations!

Articles
At Quantified Self, I forget I have Parkinson’s by Sara Riggare. Sara is a longtime member of our worldwide QS community and this heartfelt post about her experience at our conferences was wonderful to read. Experience the conference yourself and meet Sara at our QS15 Global Conference and Exposition. Register here 

Standards for Scientific Graphic Presentation by Jure Triglav. Jure is a doctor, developer, and researcher interested in how data is presented in the sciences. In this post he goes back in time to look at previous standards for presenting data that have largely been forgotten.

Painting with Data: A Conversation with Lev Manovich by Randall Packer. In this great interview, researcher, artist, and visualization expert, Lev Manovich, explains his latest work on exposing a window onto the world through photos posted to popular social apps.

Big Data, LIke Soylent Green is Made of People by Karen Gregory. A thoughtful essay here on automation, algorithmic living, and the change in value of human experience.

“In the production of these massive data sets, upon which the promise of “progress” is predicated, we are actually sharing not only our data, but the very rhythms, circulations, palpitations, and mutations of our bodies so that the data sets can be “populated” with the very inhabitants that animate us.”

When Fitbit Is the Expert Witness by Kate Crawford. I almost didn’t include this article in this week’s list. The story has been circulated so many times around the web this week, mostly without any real thought or examination. However, I found that Kate Crawford did a good job putting this news in context without resorting to sensationalism.

How California’s Crappy Vaccination Policy Puts Kids At Risk by Renee DiResta. A bit of a sensational title, but a great post that uses a variety of open data sources to showcase a growing concern about childhood vaccination policies in California.

Show&Tell
How I Used RescueTime to Baseline My Activity in 2014 and Set Goals for 2015 by Jamie Todd Rubin. I’ve been a big fan of Jamie’s writing since I found it earlier this year. He’s voracious self-tracker, mostly related to his tracking and understanding his writing, and this post doesn’t disappoint.

Sleeping My Way to Success with Data by Pamela Pavliscak. A great post by Pamela here about her experience starting tracking her sleep with the Sleep Cycle app. A great combination of actual data experience and higher-level thoughts on what it means to interface with personal data. I especially love this quote referencing her experience interacting with other sleep trackers,

“And they are doing the same thing that I’m doing — creating data about themselves, for themselves.”

Visualizations
IntoTheOkavango
Into the Okavango by The Office for Creative Research. A really neat interactive project by researchers, scientist, and the local community to document an expedition into the Okavango Delta in Botswana.

Strava
A Day in the Bike Commuting Life by Strava. The data science team at Strava put together a neat animation comprised of one-day of cycling commutes in San Francisco. Unsurprisingly, the Golden Gate Bridge is quite popular among cyclists.

From the Forum
Sleep tracking for new parents
Different Approach to ZEO Headband
Hello Everybody!
MyStress
New Self-Quantifier

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What We Are Reading

We hope you enjoy this week’s list of articles, posts, show&tell descriptions, and visualizations!

Articles
I’m Terrified of My New TV: Why I’m Scared to Turn This Thing On — And You’d Be, Too by Michael Price. Michael, a lawyer at the Brennan Center for Justice at the NYU School of Law, describes his experiences with his new “smart” TV. More sensors means more records being stored somewhere you might not have access to. Especially interesting when your device picks up every word you say:

“But the service comes with a rather ominous warning: ‘Please be aware that if your spoken words include personal or other sensitive information, that information will be among the data captured and transmitted to a third party.’ Got that? Don’t say personal or sensitive stuff in front of the TV.”

Public Perceptions of Privacy and Security in the Post-Snowden Era by Mary Madden. A great report from the Pew Research Internet Project. I don’t want to give away any of the juicy stats so head over and read the executive summary.

This Is What Happens When Scientists Go Surfing by Nate Hoppes. It’s not all privacy talk this week. This is a fun article exploring how new sensors and systems are being used to monitor surfers as they train and practice.

How Private Data is Helping Cities Build Better Bike Routes by Shaun Courtney. We covered the new wave of personal data systems and tools feeding data back into public institutions a bit before. Interesting to hear that more cities are investing in understanding their citizens through the data they’re already collecting.

What Do Metrics Want? How Quantification Prescribes Social Interaction on Facebook by Benjamin Grosser. Ben is most commonly known around the QS community as the man behind the Facebook Demetricator, a tool to strip numbers from the Facebook user interface. In this article, published in Computational Culture, he lays out an interesting argument for how Facebook has created a system in which the users, “reimagine both self and friendship in quantitative terms, and situates them within a graphopticon, a self-induced audit of metricated social performance where the many watch the metrics of the many.”

Show&Tell
The Cubicle Gym by Gregory Ferenstein. Gregory was overweight, overworked, and in pain. He started a series of experiments to improve his help, productivity, and wellbeing. I enjoyed his mention of using the Quantified Mind website to track cognition. If you find his experience interesting make sure to read a previous piece where he explains what happened when he replaced coffee with exercise.

Maximizing Sleep with Plotly and Sleep Cycle by Instructables user make_it_or_leave_it. A really nice step by step process and example here of graphing an making sense of Sleep Cycle data.

ToiletMatters Toilet Matters by Chris Speed. A super interesting post on what a family was able to learn by having access to data on of all things, the amount of toilet paper left on a roll and when it was being used. Don’t forget to read all the way to end so you can get to gems like this:

“[…]the important note is that the source of this data is not only personal to me, it is also owned by me. We built the toilet roll holder and I own the data. There are very few products or smart phone apps that I can say the same about. Usually I find myself agreeing to all manner of data agreements in order to get the ‘free’ software that is on offer. The toilet roll holder is then my first experience of producing data that I own and that I have the potential to begin to trade with.“

Visualizations
e-traces-lesia-trubat-01_800 E-Traces by Lesia Trubat. A beautiful and fun project by recently graduated design student, Lesia Trubat. Using adruinos and sensors places on the shoes of dances she was able to create unique visualizations of dance movement. Be sure to watch the video here.

 

jepricer Animated Abstractions of Human Data by James E. Pricer. James is an artist working on exposing self-collected data in new and interesting ways. Click through to see a dozen videos based on different types of data. The image above is a capture from a video based on genotypes derived from a 23anMe dataset.

The Great Wave of Kanagawa by Manuel Lima. Although this is an essay I’m placing it here in the visualization section because of it’s importance for those working on the design and delivery of data visualizations. Manuel uses the Great Wave off Kanagawa as a wonderful metaphor for designing how we visually experience data.

D3 Deconstructor by UC Berkeley VisLab. A really neat tool here for extracting and repurposing the data powering at D3.js based visualization.

From the Forum
myStress
Diagnosed sleep apnea. Looking for metrics pre/post treatment
Trend Research
New Self Quantifier
Memosee

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How to Track Your Sleep: Learn from Daniel Gartenberg at QS15

DanG_SleepGraphs

It’s commonly believed that we sleep away approximately a third of our lives. Is it good sleep? Does it help us refresh and regenerate? What can we do to make our time spent in bed even better?

Join us at our upcoming QS15 Global Conference and Exposition on June 18-20 in San Francisco to learn first-hand about how to track your sleep and benefit from your sleep data.

DGWe’re excited to have our QS Washington DC meetup organizer, PhD student, and avid self-tracker, Daniel Gartenberg, sharing his deep knowledge of tracking sleep. Daniel has used multiple devices to find out what works and what helps him achieve a better night’s sleep, including the Sleep Smart Alarm Clock, Galaxy Gear watch, the Actiwatch (a research validated devices), and the Hexoskin shirt. We may even get a peek at the sleep tracking capacities of the Apple Watch.

Daniel’s Sleep Tracking session is just one of the many hands-on, up-to-date, expertly moderated sessions we’re planning for the QS15 Global Conference and Exposition. This year, QS15 is going to be two full days of self-tracking talks, demos, and in depth discussion, followed by a third day for a grand public exposition of the latest self-tracking tools. Join us at the Fort Mason Center on the San Francisco Waterfront. We’ve made some early bird tickets available for readers of the Quantified Self blog (for a limited time): Register here!

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What We Are Reading

We had a lot of fun putting together this week’s list. Enjoy!

Articles
A Spreadsheet Way of Knowledge by Steven Levy. A few weeks ago we noted that it was the 35th anniversary of the digital spreadsheet. Steven Levy noticed too and dug up this piece he wrote for Harpers in 1984. If you read nothing else today, read this. First, because we should know where our tools come from, their history and inventors. And second, but not last nor least, because it has wonderful quotes like this:

“The spreadsheet is a tool, and it is also a world view — reality by the numbers.”

The Ethics of Experimenting on Yourself by Amy Dockser Markus. With new companies cropping up to help individuals collect and share their personal data there has been an increased interest in citizen science. A short piece here at the Wall Street Journal lays the groundwork for what may become a contentious debate between the old vanguards of the scientific institution and the companies and citizens pushing the envelope. (The article is behind a paywall, but we’ve archived it here.)

Better All The Time by James Surowiecki. I started reading this thinking it would be another good piece about the digitization of sport performance and training, and it was, but only partly. What begins with sports turns into a fascinating look at how we are succeeding, and in some cases failing, to improve.

Article 29 Data Protection Working Party: Opinion 8/2014 on the Recent Developments on the Internet of Things. Do not let the obscure boring title fool you, this is an important document, especially if you’re interested in personal data, data privacy, and data protection rights. Most interesting to me was the summary of six challenges facing IoT data privacy and protection. I’m also left wondering if other countries may follow the precedents possibly set by this EU Working Party.

30 Little-Known Features of the Health and Fitness Apps You Use Every Day by Ash Read / AddApp. Our friends at AddApp.io put together a great list of neat things you may or may not know you can do with various health and fitness apps.

Man Uses Twitter to Augment his Damaged Memory by John Paul Tiltow. Wonderful piece here about Thomas Dixon, who uses Twitter to help document his life after suffering a traumatic brain injury that severely diminished his episodic memory. What makes it more interesting is that it’s not just a journal, but also a source of inspiration for personal data analysis:

”Sometimes if I have like an hour, I’ll be like ‘How’s the last week been?’“ Dixon says. ”I’ll look at the past week and I’ll go, ‘Oh, okay. I really do want to get a run in.’ So I will use it to influence certain decisions.”

Patients and Data – Changing roles and relationships by David Gilbert and Mark Doughty. Another nice article about the ever-changing landscape that is the patient/provide/insurer ecosystem.

Show&Tell
The Quantified Anatomy of a Paper by Mohammed AlQuaraishi. Mohammed is a Systems Biology Fellow at Harvard Medical School, and he’s an avid self-tracker. In this post he lays out what he’s learned through tracking the life of a successful project, a journal publication (read it here), and how he’s applying what he learned to another project.

Calories In, Calories Out by (author unknown). A fascinating post about modeling weight reduction over time and testing to see if said model actually matches up with recorded weight. Not all math and formulas here though,

“I learned several interesting things from this experiment.  I learned that it is really hard to accurately measure calories consumed, even if you are trying.  (Look at the box and think about this the next time you pour a bowl of cereal, for example.)  I learned that a chicken thigh loses over 40% of its weight from grilling.  And I learned that, somewhat sadly, mathematical curiosity can be an even greater motivation than self-interest in personal health.”

Fitness Tracker on a Cat – Java’s Story by Pearce H. Delphin. A delightful post here about tracking and learning about a cat’s behavior by making it wear at Fitbit. Who said QS has to be serious all the time?!

Visualizations
MattYancey_Fitbit
100 Days of Quantified Self by Matt Yancey. Matt downloaded his Fitbit Flex data using our data export how-to then set out analyzing and visualizing the data. Make sure to click through for the full visualization.

IAMI_jpg
IAMI by Ligoranoreese. If you’re in San Francisco consider stoping by the Catherine Clark Gallery for this interesting exhibit. The duo, Ligoranoreese, created woven fiber optic artwork based on Fitbit data.

List of Physical Visualizations. I can’t say it any better than Mortiz Stefaner: “Remember that epic list of data sculptures and physical data visualizations? Well, it became more epic.

From the Forum
Anyone have a good way to aggregate and visualize data?
Questions about personal health tracking
Hello QS
Call for Papers: special issue of JBHI on Sensor Informatics
Sleep Tracking Device – BodyEcho

 

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What We Are Reading

We’re back after missing last week (sorry!) with a bit longer list than usual. Enjoy!

Articles
Thoughts on Quantified Self for Modifying Long Term Life Goals by Mark Krynsky. Mark, a member of our QS Los Angeles meetup group, is consistently putting together interesting ideas in the QS space. In this short post he explore how QS tools might be used to understand long-term life goals.

Open Data for Open Lands by Alyssa Ravasio. The value of data isn’t confined to what we can understand about ourselves. There is so much beneficial information out there, especially when it comes to public data. In this post, Alyssa makes the case for protecting and promoting open data ideas and concepts regarding out most precious public spaces – the national parks system.

Art at the Edge of Tomorrow: Lillian Schwartz at Bell Labs by Jer Thorpe. A wonderful biographical piece about Lillian Schwartz, a pioneer in the field of computational art and exploration.

Terms of Service by Michael Kelller and Josh Neufeld. A reporter and nonfiction cartoonist team up to use a comic to tell us about the new world of data and privacy we currently inhabit. Interesting format and compelling content!

Show&Tell
Narrative Camera by Morris Villarroel. Morris has been wearing a Narrative personal camera for six months. In this short post he explains what he’s learned and experienced over that time.

Where my 90 Hours of Mobile Screen Time in September Went by Bob Stanke. Bob used an app (Trackify) on his Android phone to track how much time he was spending on his phone and what apps he used the most.

Quitting Caffeine by Andrei-Adnan Ismail. Andrei wasn’t happy with his relationship with coffee and caffeine so he he decide to try and quit. Using tracking and really interesting use of “sprints” to gradually reduce his consumption, Andrei was able to quit. Great post here describing his process and the data he gathered along the way (including how his change affected his sleep).

Twitter Pop-up Analytics by Myles Harrison. Myles takes us through the process of downloading, visualizing, and analyzing personal data from Twitter.

Visualizations
EB_sleep_data_V3-05_1000
Seven Months of Sleep by Eric Boam. A bit of an old one here, but beautiful and informative nonetheless. Make sure to read the accompanying piece by Eric. (I’m also looking forward to seeing more about this dataviz of his Reporter app data soon.)

CalorieWeight_vizMy latest effort to visualize my calorie intake and weight loss by reddit user bozackDK. Using data collected from MyFitness pal, bozackDK has created this great visualization of his data. I asked what was learned from making this graph and received this wonderful response:

“I make graphs like these to keep myself going. I need some kind of proof that I’m doing alright, in order to keep myself wanting to go on – and a graph showing that I can (somewhat) stay within my set limits, and at the same time showing that it actually works on my weight, is just perfect.”

From the Forum
Using Facial Images to Track Mood?
Can You Track Inner Peace?
Different Approach to ZEO Headband
How Far Are You Quantified?
Google Fit

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What We Are Reading

It’s link-apolooza time! Enjoy these great news pieces, blog posts, personal data stories, and visualizations.

Articles

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Launches Initiative to Assess How Data Can Be Used to Improve Health by RWJF Staff. Some exciting news coming out of RWJF this week about their new program to explore how individuals and communities are using health data and information. Don’t forget to read the accompanying blog post to learn more.

“For These Times”: Dickens on Big Data by Irina Raicu. Who knew the philosophical debate on a life governed by measurable facts had such a pedigree!

How and Why We Are Working with the FDA: Background and a Brief Summary of the Recent Meeting with the FDA about the Nightscout Project by Scott Leibrand. We’re big fans of the Nightscout project here at QS Labs. It’s great to seem them moving forward with a productive dialogue with the FDA.

Sir Tim Berners-Lee Speaks Out on Data Ownership by Alex Hern.

The data we create about ourselves should be owned by each of us, not by the large companies that harvest it, Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the world wide web, said today.

Sensors and Sensibility by Andrew Leonard. One day we might look back at our fears of insurers nefariously using our data to adjust premiums. Until then, that fear is alive and real. Thorough reporting here from the new Backchannel.

One Quantified Self App To Rule Them All by Chris Roth. As Chris explored the growing QS space and worked on his own open-source logging app he noticed a few things. Read on to see his take on where the space should be evolving.

Quantified Health and Software Apps by Sara K. Moir. What started as a Tweetstorm about her experience with MyFitnessPal expanded into a great exploration about what it means to be a user (and designer) of health behavior tracking tools.

Show&Tell

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How Text Messages Change from Dating to Marriage by Alice Zhao. Only a data scientist would celebrate a six-year anniversary with a thoughtful and thorough analysis of their communication. Alice did a great job here showing what’s changed over the years as her and her husband have moved from courtship to marriage.

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Losing 58.3 Lbs For Science by Zachary Townsend. Zachary just finished up his participation in the One Diet Does Not Fit All: Weight Loss study. Over the last year he’s lost nearly 60lbs and learned a lot about himself and his diet.

Using JSL to import BodyMedia Fit Activity monitor data into JMP by Shannon Conners. We featured Shannon’s amazing visualization work in our September 20th edition of What We’re Reading. She returns here with a thorough how-to on how to explore BodyMedia and MyFitnessPal data in JMP. Even as a non-JMP user I was delighted to find out about the MyFitnessPal Data Downloader Chrome Extension she used to download her meal data.

Visualizations
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My Up Skyline for the Week by Abe Gong. Abe is a data scientist at Jawbone was taking a look at his own activity data and decided to use the then new Jawbone API to download his data and make some interesting visualizations.

ER_SolarEclipses
Your Life on Earth by the BBC. Not a typical QS visualization, but unique and interesting to see what’s happened in and around the world over the course of your life.

I’ve been exploring upgrading my data visualization skills by learning D3. If you’re in the same boat or want know someone who is then you can point them towards this great intro from the engineers at Square.

From the Forum

Decode Your Chronic Illness
The Ethics of QS
Tasks & Measures
Lifelogging to Prevent Depression
Wearable Body Temperature Tool
Sleep Apnea Treatments
Looking for Android Time Tracking App

Today’s Number is 35: The age of the spreadsheet!

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