Search Results for: weight

What We Are Reading

Below you’ll find this week’s selection of interesting bits and pieces from around the web. Enjoy!

Articles
Open Books: The E-Reader Reads You by Rob Horning. A fantastic essay about the nature of delight and discovery, and how that may (is) changing due to data collected from e-readers. For those interested in books and data this article By Buzzfeed’s Joseph Bernstein is also an interesting read.

Flashing lights in the quantified self-city-nation by Matthew W. Wilson. Quantified Self, smart cities, and Kanye West quotes – this commentary in the Regional Studies, Regional Science journal has it all. Read closely, especially the final paragraph, which gives space to think about the role the institutions and companies that provide cities with the means to “be smart” have in our in social and urban spaces.

Most Wearable Technology Has Been a Commercial Failure, Says Historian by Madeleine Monson-Rosen. This is a interesting book review for Susan Elizabeth Ryan’s Garments of Paradise which had me thinking about the nature of wearables, customization, and expression.

‘The Cloud’ and Other Dangerous Metaphors by Tim Hwang and Karen Levy. This was mentioned so many times over the last few days by so many smart friends and colleagues that I had to set aside time to read it. It was time well spent. The authors make the case that how we talk about data (personal, public, mechanical, and bioligical) is tied to the metaphors we use, and how those metaphors can either help or hinder the broader ethical and cultural questions we find ourselves grappling with.

Why the Internet Should Be a Public Resource by Philip N. Howard. This isn’t the first, nor will it be the last, argument for changing the way we think about and regulate the Internet. Worth reading the whole things, but in case you don’t consider this point:

And then we might even imagine an internet of things as a public resource that donates data flows, processing time, and bandwidth to non-profits, churches, civic groups, public health experts, academics, and communities in need.

Computers Are Learning How To Treat Illnesses By Playing Poker And Atari by Oliver Roeder. How does research into algorithms and AI intended for winning poker games morph into something that can optimize insulin treatment? An interesting exploration on the background and future implications of computers that can learn how to play games.

Data Stories #45 With Nicholas Felton. by Enrico Bertini and Moritz Stefaner. In this episode of the great Data Stories podcast Nicholas Felton talks about his background, his interest in typography, and what led him to start producing personal annual reports. Super fun to listen to them geek out about the tools Nicholas uses to track himself.

Increasingly, people are tracking their every move by Mark Mann. A great peak into some of our QS Toronto community members and how they use self-tracking.

Quantified Existentialism by Ernesto Ramirez. I’m putting this last here because it feels a bit self-congratulatory. Earlier this week I took some time to examine how common it is for people to express their relationship with what counts when they use self-tracking tools. It was a fun exercise.

Show&Tell
Insights From User Generated Heart Rate Variability Data by Marco Altini. While not a personal show&tell (however, I’m sure his data is in there somewhere), this great post details what Marco was able to learn about HRV based on 230 users and 13,758 recordings of HRV.

Quantify This Thursday: No Coding Required by Kerri MacKay. A bit different post here, more of a how-to, but I found it really compelling the lengths Kerri went to get get her Fitbit data to show up on he Pebble watch. I was especially drawn to her explanation of why this method is important to her:

The reality is, getting nudges every time I look at the clock or dismiss a text notification on my Pebble (via my step count) is yet another way to make the wearing-a-wearable less passive and the data meaningful.

Correlating Weight with Blood Pressure by Sam. A short and simple post detailing how Sam used Zenobase and his iHealth devices to see how weight loss was associated with his blood pressure.

Visualizations
WithingHolidays
The Effect of End of Year Festivities on Health Habits by Withings. The above is just one of four great visualizations from Withings exploring how the holidays affect how users sleep, move, and weight themselves. Unsurprisingly people are less likely to weight themselves on Christmas day (I looked at my data, I am among those non-weighers).

SimonData
Simon Buechi: In Pure Data by Simon Buechi. A simple, elegant dashboard intended to represent himself to the world.

MatYancy_Coding
Grad School Coding Analysis by Matt Yancey. The above is just a preview of two fantastic visualizations that summarize the coding Matt did while enrolled in the Northewestern Masters of Analytics program.

Fitbit_NewYears_Steps
News Year’s Eve Celebration in Steps by Lenna K./Fitbit. A fun visualization describing differences in how people in different age groups moved while celebrating the new year.

From The Forum
How do I visualize information quickly? (mobile app)
Monitoring Daily Emotions
Best Heartrate Monitor that syncs with Withings Ecosystem
Is the BodyMedia Fit still alive?
Capture Online Activities (and More) into Day One Journal Software (Mac/iOS)

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QS Access: Self-Report & Quantified Self in Health Research

As part of our new Access channel we’re going to highlight interesting stories, ideas, and research related to self-tracking data and data access issues and the role they take in personal and public health. We recently found this expert report, published in the International Journal of Obesity, that tackles issues with the data researchers rely on for understanding diet and physical activity behaviors, and ultimately concludes that the data is fundamentally flawed.

Researchers has known for a long time that relying on individuals to understand, recall, and accurately report what they eat and how much they exercise isn’t the best way to understand the realities of everyday life. Unfortunately for many years, this was the only way to track this information – interviews, surveys, and research measures. Only recently have tools, devices, and methods matured to a point where objective information can be captured and analyzed.

The authors of this article make the case that obesity and weight management fundamentally relies on getting these numbers right, and unfortunately most research hasn’t. Reading the background on self-report data and the call to action the authors make for developing and using more objective measures we can’t help but wonder about the role of commercial personal self-tracking tools. How can we, as a community of users, toolmakers, and researchers work together to open up access pathways so that the millions of people tacking pictures of their meals and uploading their step data can have a positive impact on personal and public health? This is an open question, one that we’re excited to be working on.

If you’re interested in these type of questions, or working on projects related to data access we invite you to get in touch and keep following along here with us.

 

 

 

 

 

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How To Access & Export MyFitnessPal Data

MFP

MyFitnessPal is one of the leading dietary tracking tools, currently used by tens of millions of people all around the world to better track and understand the foods they consume every day. Their mobile apps and online tools allow individuals to enter foods and keep track of their micro- and macro-nutrient consumption, connect additional devices such as fitness trackers, and connect with their community – all in the name of weight management. However, there is no natively available method for easily accessing your dietary data for personal analysis, visualization, or storage.

With a bit of digging in the MyFitnessPal help section we can see that they have no official support for data export. However, they mention the ability to print reports and save PDF files that contain your historical data. While better than some services, a PDF document is far from easy to use when you’re trying to make your own charts or take a deeper look into your data.

We spent some time combing the web for examples of MyFitnessPal data export solutions over the last few days. We hope that some of these are useful to you in your ongoing self-tracking experiences.

Browser Extensions/Bookmarks

MyFitnessPal Data Downloader: This extension allows you to directly download a CSV report from your Food Report page. (Chrome only)

MyFitnessPal Data Export: This extension is tied to another website, FoodFastFit.com. If you install the extension, it will redirect you back to that site where your data is displayed and you can download the CSV file. (Chrome only)

ExportMFP: A simple bookmark that will open a text area with comma-separated values for weight and calories, which you can copy/paste into your data editor of choice.

MyFitnessPal Reports: A bookmarklet that allows you to generates more detailed graphs and reports.

 Web Apps/Tools

MyFitnessPal Analyser: Accesses your diet and weight data. It requires you to input your password so be careful.

Export MyFitnessPal Data to CSV: Simple web tool for exporting your data.

FreeMyDiary: A recently developed tool for exporting your food diary data.

Technical Solutions

MyFitnessPal Data Access via Python: If you’re comfortable working with the Python language, this might be for you. Developed by Adam Coddington, it allows access to your MyFitnessPal data programmatically

MFP Extractor and Trend Watcher: An Excel Macro, developed by a MyFitnessPal user, that exports your dietary and weight data into Excel. This will only work for Windows users.

Access MyFitnessPal Data in R: If you’re familiar with R, then this might work for you.

QS Access + Apple HealthKit

If you’re an iPhone user, you can connect MyFitnessPal to Apple’s HealthKit app to view your MyFitnessPal data alongside other data you’re collecting. You can also easily export the data from your Health app using our QS Access app. Data is available in hourly and daily breakdowns, and you should be able to export any data type MyFitnessPal is collecting to HealthKit.

As always, we’re interested to hear your stories and learn about your experiences with exploring your data. Feel free to leave comments here or get in touch via twitter or email.

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Meetups This Week

The spirit of reflection that accompanies a new year is still present as eight QS meetups in four countries get together this week.  Munich, in particular, will be discussing how to use QS tools to help track and reach goals for 2015.

A common resolution is to lose weight, and weight management is the focus of the event in Stockholm today. Their show&tell talks include one person who, while on parental leave, lost 6 kilos by playing games and the story of a woman who used running and self-tracking to lose half her bodyweight.

One thing that I love about collecting the upcoming meetups is seeing the different formats that local organizers are adopting to serve their community. In England, the group in Cambridge are starting the year with an exciting launch event to engage their community. In addition to the classic Show&Tell talk, they are experimenting with their format by having a talk focused on QS technology, as well as, a “researchy” talk to tap into the academia presence in their membership. In the other direction, the Dallas group are keeping things informal and casual with a chat over dinner.

To see when the next meetup in your area is, check the full list of the over 100 QS meetup groups in the right sidebar. Don’t see one near you? Why not start your own! If you organize a QS meetup, please post pictures of your event to the Meetup website. We love  seeing them!

Monday, January 12
London, England
Stockholm, Sweden

Tuesday, January 13
Boston, Massachusetts
Dallas/Fort Worth
Lansing, Michigan
Munich, Germany

Wednesday, January 14
Cambridge, England

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Julie Price: 30lbs of Family Visits, Races, and Games

Julie Price has been tracking her weight consistently for the last four years. Like many of us, she found that her weight goes up and down depending on various life events. In this talk, presented at the Bay Area QS meetup group, Julie discussed what she’s learned about her weight and what correlates with weight gain and weight loss. Specifically, she focuses on the role of family gatherings, exercise and running races, and how different food and dieting methods either helped of hindered her progress.

We’re excited to have Julie joining us at our 2015 QS Global Conference and Exposition on June 18-20th. Early bird tickets are now available, and we hope you can join us for a great three days of learning, sharing, and experiencing the latest in QS techniques and tools. Register now.

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Meetups This Week

This is a very exciting week as two new QS groups, Göteberg and Ljubljana, will have their very first meetup. In Berlin, they will look at how to “biohack the holidays,” sharing techniques on preventing weight gain and avoiding hangovers during the year-end festivities, as well as a show&tell on what one person found when he tested the antioxidant content of his coffee. Looks like a fun event!

If you attend any of these events, please upload your photos to Meetup!

Monday, December 15
Göteborg, Sweden
Miami, Florida

Wednesday, December 17
Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas

Thursday, December 18
Berlin, Germany
Ljubljana, Slovenia

Also, here are a couple pictures from the recent QS Bay Area meetup. It was a great group and a great night.

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David Joerg: Building My Personal Operating System

David Joerg is a software developer in New York City and had some interest in personal data. Inspired by attending his first QS meetup in late 2013, he decided to take a deeper dive into the data he was collecting, add some new systems, and see if he could build something to help him better understand himself. What he ended up building was his own data dashboard, a personal operating system, that allowed him to see how he was doing across the various metrics he was interested in including, sleep, exercise, weight, unread emails, and more. In this talk, presented at the New York QS meetup group, David explains his process and what he learned from developing and using this system.

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What We Are Reading

Articles
LifeLogging: Personal Big Data by Cathal Gurrin, Alan Smeaton, and Aiden Doherty. A wonderful overview of the field of lifelogging. Special attention is given to how information retrieval plays a role in how we can understand and use our lifelogs.

What happens when patients know more than their doctors? Experiences of health interactions after diabetes patient education: a qualitative patient-led study by Rosamund Snow, Charlottle Humphrey, and Jane Sandall. In this qualitative study, the authors engaged with 21 patients with type 1 diabetes who had developed expertise about their condition. Some interesting findings about how healthcare providers may be uncomfortable with patient who understand themselves and their condition. (Thanks to Sara Riggare for sharing this article with us!)

Internet of You: Users Become Part of the City-as-a-System by Tracy Huddleson. An good look into how wearables and personal technology might have an impact on the public infrastructure, institutions, and spaces.

Welcome to Dataland by Ian Bogost. Not sure how I missed this one piece from late July, but glad I stumbled across it this week. Ian Bogost takes a tour through the actual and imagine implications of the Disney Magic Band. I especially enjoyed the historical context describing the history of futurism at Disney.

Show&Tell
Gary Wolf on Cool Tools Show #15. QS co-founder, Gary Wolf, speaks with Mark Frauenfelder and Kevin Kelly on the Cool Tools Podcast about his favorite self-tracking tools and what he’s learned from using them.

My Life Analysis Spreadsheet by Reddit user batting_1000. A really interesting example of using Excel to track various aspects of daily life. Make sure to click through for the example screen shots.

Visualizations
BasisInterstellarMy heart rate during Interstellar (via Basis Peak) by Reddit user javaski. An nice use of the BasisRetreiver tool to download and analyze heart rate data from the new Basis Peak device.

Seasonal-compliance1-1024x576Activity Time vs. Device Wear Time by Shannon Conners. Shannon plotted her actual wear time using the BodyMedia Fit against the activity data to show that low activity numbers are probably caused by hotter summer months when wearing the armband caused unwanted tan lines.

“If I had not explored my activity and usage data first to remind me of this usage pattern, I could have created any number of plausible explanations for why my activity levels were so much lower during the hot North Carolina summer months.”

From the Forum
Wearable for Stress – Olive
Necklace worn fitness trackers?
MoodTraces App
New Heart Rate Variability and Coherence Papers
Artistic Apps

This Week on QuantifiedSelf.com
Ben Finn: Improving My Sleep
Nan Shellabarger: 26 Years of Weight Tracking

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Nan Shellabarger: 26 Years of Weight Tracking

“When I look at this, this is the story of my life in these years.”

NanS_26yrsweight

Nan Shellabarger has been tracking her weight for 26 years, including almost daily tracking since 1998. In the talk embedded below, presented at the Washington DC QS meetup group, Nan describes her experience with diving deep into how she’s making sense of her weight data. By looking over her complete history and layering in her personal contextual data she was able to find how different life events played a role in weight loss and gain. For example, she found that physical challenges and events were “tremendous motivation to get out there and doing things as well as helping me focusing on my eating.” Nan has also used a variety of activity trackers since 2010, starting with the Body Media Fit and now the Garmin Vivofit and Jawbone UP. These devices helped her explore calorie expenditure as it relates to her weight loss. On the other side of the equation, she also explored how diet tracking influenced her weight. Watch her great talk below to hear the whole story.

We hope to see an update of this great talk when Nan joins us at our QS15 Global Conference and Exposition next June in San Francisco. Early bird tickets are available for a limited time. Register now!

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Meetups This Week

We have a full set of Quantified Self meetups for the upcoming week. There will be 8 occurring in 4 countries.

Meetups featuring talks include the always excellent London group, as well as, the Washington D.C. meetup with show&tells on tracking one’s weight for over 26 years and daily routines. The Groningen meetup will feature a talk on continuous glucose monitoring and what someone found out from keeping a comprehensive log book for three months.

In Indianapolis, they’ll go over how to use Apple’s Healthkit for QS. Surely, the QS Access app will come up in discussion. The group in Tokyo will be having a group discussion to talk about what they are tracking. And Portland will have their monthly workgroup, where they will make progress on their self-tracking projects.

Tuesday (November 18)
Tokyo, Japan
Miami, Florida

Wednesday (November 19)
Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas
Washington, DC

Thursday (November 20)
Groningen, Netherlands
London, England
Portland, Oregon

Saturday (November 22)
Indianapolis, Indiana

Also, check out these photos from last week’s meetup in Warsaw:

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