Maggie Delano on ECG and Activity Tracking

December 11, 2013

“I wanted to see what I could find when I tracked my electrocardiogram over time.”

Maggie Delano developed a wearable ECG and activity monitor as part of her masters thesis at MIT. She decided to test it out on herself to see what she could find out about her daily activities and her sleep. What she found out surprised her. Watch her talk to hear what she learned and be sure to stick around for the engaging Q&A that follows. (slides are also posted here.)

We’ll be posting videos from our 2013 Global Conference during the next few months. If you’d like see talks like this in person we invite you to join us in Amsterdam for our 2014 Quantified Self Europe Conference on May 10 and 11th.

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