To see ourselves as others see us

April 14, 2009

Self-tracking is about self knowledge. But what if the knowledge you want is contained in the minds of others? Here are two recent videos from the last QS Show&Tell that bear on this question.

We unfortunately didn’t capture the lovely talk Joe Betts-LaCroix and Lisa Betts-LaCroix gave at the recent QS on self-tracking in a relationship, but the Q&A is here, and it includes some really thoughtful questions and discussion, including Joe’s description of his simple web interface to Google docs, Lisa’s description of her analog self-tracking method, and an intriguing mention of social tracking, following up a suggestion by Paul Sas. (See below)

 

 

In this next video, Paul Sas tells a hilarious anecdote about suddenly catching a glimpse of himself through the eyes of another person, which leads to his proposal for a “dynamical dinner party.” Within a few minutes after the talks ended, he had his volunteers.

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