Douglas Mason on Musical Informatics

December 18, 2011

Douglas Mason didn’t know who the Beatles were until he went to grad school. As a classically trained musician, he was blown away when he saw their unique chord choices. He started to investigate why the Beatles’ music sounded so good. Douglas created a shorthand musical notation to represent songs as strings and analyze things like melody, time signatures, chord changes, and lyrics. He describes his project and what he has learned in the video below. (Filmed by the Boston QS Show&Tell meetup group.)

Related Posts

Anne Wright & Personal Science

Gary Wolf

April 14, 2022

This animation summarizes Anne Wright's description of how a person coping with chronic health issues progresses through the process of self-research. Click through to learn how to get early access to our book, "Personal Science: Learning to Observe."

Recovering from ACL Surgery

Davis Masten

January 27, 2022

Davis Masten describes how he used simple observational practices to aid his recovery from a common but challenging surgery.

Measuring Mood and Emotion

Gary Wolf

August 11, 2021

A post discussing the nuances behind designing experiments that track mood, including insights into the debate as to whether negative and positive emotions should be measured as polar opposite or considered states that can be experienced at the same time.